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" Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain! Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire, are my daughters: I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness; I never gave you kingdom, call'd you children, You owe me no subscription: then, let fall Your horrible pleasure;... "
Large-Scale Disasters: Prediction, Control, and Mitigation - Page 1
edited by - 2008
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 33

Kenneth Muir - 2002 - 236 pages
...sky, That dost not bite so nigh As benefits forgot. . . is the basis of what Lear goes on to say : I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness; I never...kingdom, call'd you children; You owe me no subscription . . . The rude breath of the wind is echoed in Albany's just rebuke of Goneril (1v, ii, 29ff.), in...
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Coleridge's Notebooks: A Selection

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 2002 - 264 pages
...singled out as distinctively representing the Imagination (as opposed to the Fancy) in BL (i. 85): 'Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters. | I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness; | l never gave you kingdom, call'd you children; | You owe me no subscription' (1n. ii., ll. 15-18)....
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Gold: The Final Science Fiction Collection

Isaac Asimov - 2009 - 416 pages
...back to the castle and make peace with his daughters, but Lear doesn't even hear him. He roars on: "Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain! Nor...Here I stand your slave, A poor, infirm, weak, and despis'd old man. ..." The Duke of Kent, Lear's loyal servant (though the King in a fit of rage has...
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Playing Lear

Oliver Ford Davies - 2003 - 211 pages
...realisation of the text and indeed of the emotions.'7 Lear's second speech offers some interesting contrasts: Rumble thy bellyful! Spit fire, spout rain! Nor rain,...elements, with unkindness. I never gave you kingdom, called you children; You owe me no subscription. Why then, let fall Your horrible pleasure. Here I...
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A Routledge Literary Sourcebook on William Shakespeare's King Lear

Grace Ioppolo - 2003 - 192 pages
...Good nuncle, in, and ask thy daughters' blessing. Here's a night piries neither wise man nor fooL LEAR Rumble thy bellyful; spit, fire; spout, rain! Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters. I task not you, you elements, with unkindness. I never gave you kingdom, called you children. You owe...
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Goodnight Children Everywhere and Other Plays

Richard Nelson - 2004 - 419 pages
...acting already, Mr. Macready. And acting well. (Forrest smiles, Macready turns to the house.) MACREADY: Rumble thy bellyful. Spit, fire. Spout, rain. Nor...fire are my daughters. I tax not you, you elements — (From outside, quite near, gunfire and shouts.) FORREST (Screaming): I told you before, to just...
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Words that Count: Essays on Early Modern Authorship in Honor of MacDonald P ...

MacDonald Pairman Jackson - 2004 - 291 pages
...of his daughters' malign will, the elements, against which he will oppose his desecrated nakedness: "You owe me no subscription: then let fall /Your horrible pleasure; here I stand, your slave" (3.2.18-21). Thus, however virtuous Kent's disobedience may seem to us, it nonetheless remains a kind...
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The Construction of Tragedy: Hubris

Mary Anneeta Mann - 2004 - 228 pages
...nature, dominance over it. Lear partially exemplifies it: I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness! 1 never gave you kingdom, call'd you children, You owe me no subscription. Then the true relationship reveals itself: . . . Here I stand, your slave, A poor, infirm, weak, and despised...
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The Construction of Tragedy: Hubris

Mary Anneeta Mann - 2004 - 228 pages
...the western mortal that reads into taming nature, dominance over it. Lear partially exemplifies it: I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness! I never gave you kingdom, caJPd you children, You owe me no subscription. Then the true relationship reveals itself: . . . Here...
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The Great Comedies and Tragedies

William Shakespeare - 2005 - 896 pages
...Good nuncle, in; ask thy daughters blessing! Here's a night pities neither wise men nor fools. LEAR Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain! Nor...elements, with unkindness: I never gave you kingdom, called you children; You owe me no subscription. Then let fall Your horrible pleasure. Here I stand...
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