Page images
PDF
EPUB

Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED DISEASES: SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED

JULY 25, 1953
(Numbers after diseases are category numbers of the Sixth Revision of the International Lists, 1948)

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][subsumed][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED DSEASES: SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED

JULY 25, 1953-Continued
(Numbers after diseases are category numbers of the Sixth Revision of the International Lists, 1948)

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

The chart shows the number of deaths reported for 106 major cities of the United States by week for the current year, and, for comparison, the median of the number of deaths reported for the corresponding weeks of the three previous calendar years. (The median is the central one of the three values arranged in order of magnitude.) If a report is not received from a city in time to be included in the total for the current week, an estimate is made to maintain comparability for graphic presentation.

The figures reported represent the number of death certificates received in the vital statistics offices during the week indicated, for deaths occurring in that city. Figures compiled in this way, by week of receipt, usually approximate closely the number of deaths occurring during the week. However, differences are to be expected because of variations in the interval

between death and receipt of the certificate.

While week-to-week changes in the total number of deaths reported for all major cities generally represent a change in mortality conditions, this may not be true for variations in weekly figures for each city. For example, in a city where 50 deaths are the weekly average, the number of deaths occurring in a week may be expected to vary by chance alone from 36 to 64 (d + 2Vd, where

+ d represents the average number of deaths per week).

The number of deaths in cities of the same size may also differ because of variations in the age, race, and sex composition of their populations, and because some cities are hospital centers serving the surrounding areas. Changes from year to year in the number of deaths may be due in part to population increases or decreases.

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

595 2,498 2,028

622 706 410 546

206 1,032

[blocks in formation]

1, 156

[blocks in formation]

MIDDLE ATLANTIC

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

924

682 463

472 2,580

791 1,532 (3,368) 1,334 4,437 1,514 2,180 1,109 1, 106

22

--

EAST NORTH CENTRAL

140
39
86
36
26

1,279 4,680 1,631 2,417 1,186 1, 125

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

27

Akron-
Canton----
Chicago-
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbus
Dayton-
Detroit---
Evansville-
Flint---
Fort Wayne
Grand Rapids--
Indianapolis-
Milwaukee--
Peoria---
South Bend--
Toledo---
Youngstown-

Birmingham

Chattanooga 1, 203

Knoxville4,044

Louisville--1,072

Memphis
910

Mobile---
966
2,163

Montgomery

Nashville-
3,099
46, 743

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL
1, 118

Austin-14,029

Baton Rouge 5,067

Corpus Christi2,731

Dallas--666

El Paso-1,527

Fort Worth1,309

Houston -874

Little Rock(850)|| New Orleans

Oklahoma City-

San Antonio-
1,596

Shreveport-
803 Tulsa-
21, 302

MOUNTAIN
4, 205
6,102 Albuquerque--
2,942

Colorado Springs
1,751

Denver--9,015

Ogden--1,008

Phoenix-

Pueblo---
884 Salt Lake City-
1,079

Tucson---
3,258

PACIFIC 3,476

853 Berkeley---

673 Long Beach-
2,594 Los Angeles
1,375 Oakland-

Pasadena - -
Portland, Oreg.
Sacramento---

San Diego-
721

San Francisco-1,026

Seattle--3,332

Spokane -
3,293

Tacoma--
1,864
7,133 Honolulu

53 27 660 142 214 111

63 294 28 27 28 38 100 121 36 22 78 46

1,697

808 21, 996 4,317 6,047 3,069 1,839 9, 302

980 1,088

874 1, 152 3, 302 3,621

922

701 2,675 1,572

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

718

365 3,002

382 607

325 1,160 (152)

55 259 33 34 15 38 94 95 30 20 79 55

1,003

WEST NORTH CENTRAL

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

554 1,337 12,805 2,804

935 2,775 1,344 2,067 5,564 3,250 1, 190 1,001 (968)

1, 459

788 1,005 3,660 3,801 1, 929 7,289

[blocks in formation]

Symbols. -parentheses [0]:

data not included in table 4; 3 dashes

.

data not available.

GPO 9.3.7

[ocr errors]

Morbidity

and

Mortality Repori

[graphic]
[ocr errors]

August 7, 1953

Washington 25, D. C.

Vol. 2, No. 30

Provisional Information on Selected Notifiable Diseases in the United States for

Week Ended August 1, 1953

The number of poliomyelitis cases reported for ine current week is 1,630 which is 20 percent higher than the number (1,350) reported for the previous week. However, it is 29 percent below the number (2,306) for the same week last year. The cumulative total for the 1953 "disease year” is 8,348 as compared with 9,394 in 1952, and the cumulative total for the calendar year is 9,862 as compared with 10,582 for the same period last year.

Five of the 9 geographic divisions reported significantly larger numbers of cases for the current week as compared with the previous week, 3 reported approximately the same number, and 1 (West South Central) reported a decrease. States reporting relatively large increases over the previous week were: New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska, Maryland, Montana, Utah, and California.

While North Carolina reported no increase of cases for the State as a whole, one additional county (Avery) has reported a sufficiently large number to qualify for mass immunization with gamma globulin. In Caldwell County cases were reported as follows: 26, for the week ended July 11; 31, for the week ended July 18; 8, for the following week, and 7, for the current week. In Catawba County, 21, 23, 19, and 18 cases, respectively, were reported for the same weeks. For the current week 34 of the 100 counties in the State reported 1 or more cases. In Montgomery County, Alabama, 2 cases of poliomyelitis were reported for the current week, and on August 3, a report of 4 additional cases was received.

During the week ended August 1, 19 deaths from poliomyelitis were reported as follows: 1 in New Hampshire; 2 in New York City; 4 in Ohio; 1 each in Cook, Madison, Union, and Will Counties, Illinois; 5 in Minnesota; 1 each in Custer County, Montana, Sweetwater County, Wyoming, and San Diego County, California.

Muscle biopsy was compatible although not diagnostic of trichiniasis. Gastro-enteritis

Dr. Roy F. Feemster, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, reports an outbreak of gastro-enteritis among 81 persons at a camp. Of these, 60 experienced nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps 4 to 14 hours after eating creamed chicken for lunch. The gravy used in the preparation of the creamed chicken was left unrefrigerated overnight. None of the creamed chicken was available for laboratory examination. Hamburgers were served for dinner the same day but were not suspected as the vehicle of infection. Information of stool specimens obtained from food handlers and from some of the patients was not available. No history of illness or evidence of skin lesions was found among the food handlers.

Dr. Halverson reports 2 outbreaks of gastro-enteritis in one county in California. The first outbreak occurred among 150 persons who attended a lodge gathering. Of these, 68 became ill from 10 to 48 hours after eating roast turkey and dressing. The turkeys were roasted for 6 hours, allowed to cool for about 4 hours, and then sliced. The meat was placed in a refrigerator until the next day, when it was removed and warmed before serving. The dressing was made by adding turkey broth to a prepared mix. Specimens were taken from the turkey and dressing but the results were not available at the time of the report. Specimens from food handlers were all negative for pathogenic organisms. The second outbreak occurred among several hundred persons who attended a picnic. Thirty persons became ill with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, extreme stomach pains, retching, and shock from 3 to 6 hours after eating corned beef or tongue sandwiches at the picnic, or from corned beef purchased at the picnic and eaten at home. The food was unrefrigerated many hours during transportation to and at the picnic area. Laboratory tests on samples of corned beef from refrigerators of 3 persons who had taken some of the meat home, revealed the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. Rabies in bats

Dr. L. L. Parks, Florida State Board of Health, reports the confirmation of rabies in bats in Hillsborough County, Florida. Rabies infection was found in 6 of 90 bats shot. Two of the 6 were Seminole bats and 4 were yellow bats. One person is reported to have been bitten and has received antirabies vaccine. An investigation is being carried out and control measures applied.

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

Infectious hepatitis

Dr. J. D. Purvis, Pennsylvania Department of Health, gives information on an outbreak of infectious hepatitis which occurred in a school. The first cases were discovered about the middle of February. Since then 376 cases have been reported with a peak of 204 appearing during April. Only 4 cases have been reported for July.

Trichiniasis

Dr. W. L. Halverson, Director, California Department of Public Health, reports a case of trichiniasis in a 19-year-old white man. The symptoms were generalized aches and pains, swelling of eyelids, pain on movement of eyes, and headache. Eosinophilia appeared 5 days after onset of illness. The patient, a soldier, states that while on leave in another State, he and his wife had a meal in a restaurant about 10 days prior to onset of symptoms. It is reported that he and his wife both like pork and pork products. The wife had a similar illness and was found to have 28 percent eosinophilia. The diagnosis on the husband was based on the clinical picture and the appearance of eosinophilia.

Communicable diseases in other areas

A suspect case of smallpox has been reported in Tijuana, Mexico. The patient arrived in the city as a member of a circus. State and local epidemiologists are tracing movements of the circus and of the patient to determine contacts. They are having difficulties in obtaining a history and other epidemiological data in connection with this case. Mass vaccination of the population in Tijuana and surrounding areas is being carried out. No other cases have been reported as yet. The patient is now convalescing and shedding scabs are being tested for smallpox.

172 LOT OF ME

[ocr errors][merged small]
« PreviousContinue »