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Y 4. J 8972:: S. nrg.102-50% HRc. 102-505
U.S. REFUGEE PROGRAMS FOR 1992:
ANNUAL REFUGEE CONSULTATIONS

HEARING

BEFORE THE

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

UNITED STATES SENATE

ONE HUNDRED SECOND CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION

ON

THE U.S. REFUGEE PROGRAMS FOR 1992

SEPTEMBER 24, 1991

Serial No. J-102-41

Printed for the use of the Committee on the Judiciary

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For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office
Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402

ISBN 0-16-037740-4

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

JOSEPH R. BIDEN, JR., Delaware, Chairman EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts STROM THURMOND, South Carolina HOWARD M. METZENBAUM, Ohio

ORRIN G. HATCH, Utah DENNIS DECONCINI, Arizona

ALAN K. SIMPSON, Wyoming PATRICK J. LEAHY, Vermont

CHARLES E. GRASSLEY, Iowa HOWELL HEFLIN, Alabama

ARLEN SPECTER, Pennsylvania PAUL SIMON, Illinois

HANK BROWN, Colorado HERBERT KOHL, Wisconsin

RONALD A. KLAIN, Chief Counsel

JEFFREY J. PECK, Staff Director
TERRY L. WOOTEN, Minority Chief Counsel and Staff Director

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U.S. REFUGEE PROGRAMS FOR 1992: ANNUAL

REFUGEE CONSULTATIONS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1991

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY,

Washington, DC. The committee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:39 a.m., in room SD-226, Dirksen Senate Office Building, Hon. Edward M. Kennedy presiding.

Present: Senators Kennedy, Simon, Simpson, and Grassley.

Also present: Jerry Tinker, staff director; Michael Myers, counsel, Richard Day, minority chief counsel, and Carl Hampe, minority counsel.

OPENING STATEMENT Senator KENNEDY. We will come to order. The committee meets today to conduct the annual consultation on U.S. refugee programs. This is a time of historic change in the world, of unprecedented opportunities for achieving peace and resolving festering conflicts around the globe. It is a time when the winds of change are sweeping away many of the obstacles of the past, providing extraordinary new possibilities for solutions to longstanding humanitarian and human rights problems.

Yet, despite these positive developments, we are not seeing a new world order emerging as much as witnessing continued world disorder. Unfortunately, since we last met there have been new movements of refugees and migrants from new conflicts and from the economic disruptions caused by the historic changes we are celebrating. This is particularly so today in Yugoslavia, the Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe.

Despite new steps toward peace in Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa, Southern Africa, and Cambodia, massive refugee problems persist and human needs remain great in all of these areas.

And in Central America, in our own backyard, we must do more to assure that recent steps toward peace in the region are not undermined by unwarranted economic problems, as in Nicaragua, or unresolved human rights abuses in El Salvador and Guatemala. Continued U.S. assistance should be based upon tangible progress toward peace, not the status quo of more military aid for more conflict.

The end of the cold war challenges America not to disengage from world affairs, but to re-engage and to deal with these problems and issues in new and more effective ways. We should be pre

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