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AGENCY INDEX SUMMARY

and reduction in their use to ensure human safety and protection of environmental quality; establishment of tolerance levels for pesticides that occur in or on food; monitoring of pesticide residue levels in food, humans, and nontarget fish and wildlife and their environments; and investigation of pesticide accidents. It also coordinates activities under its statutory responsibilities with other agencies for assessment and control of toxic substances and pesticides.

66.436-66.437, 66.439-66.440, 66.454, 66.456, 66.458, 66.460-66.463, 66.466-66.469, 66.471-66.472, 66.474-66.475, 66.478-66.481) Develops national programs, technical policies, and regulations for water pollution control and water supply; ground water protection; marine and estuarine protection; enforcement of standards; water quality standards and effluent guidelines development; technical direction, support, and evaluation of regional water activities; development of programs for technical assistance and technology transfer; and provision of training in the field of water quality.

Office of Environmental Information (66.608, 66.612) The Office of Environmental Information (OEI) is headed by the EPA's Chief Information Officer and is responsible for managing the life cycle of information to support EPA's mission of protecting human health and the environment. OEI works to identify and implement innovative information technology and information management solutions that strengthen EPA's ability to achieve its mission. OEI does this by ensuring the quality of EPA's information, the efficiency and reliability of EPA's technology, data collection and exchange efforts, and access services.

Office of the Administrator (66.605, 66.609-66.611, 66.950-66.952) Provides for support grants as an alternative grant delivery mechanism to allow a State or local agency responsible for continuing pollution control programs to develop an integrated approach to pollution control.

Office of International and Tribal Affairs (66.473, 66.926, 66.931) EPA's Office of International and Tribal Affairs (OITA) plays a crucial role in advancing the United States' international environmental priorities. Working with the experts from EPA's other program and regional offices, othe government agencies, and other nations and international organizations, OITA identifies international environmental issues and helps implement technical and policy options to address them. OITA is comprised of a multi-disciplinary staff who respect and reflect the diversity of the global community. OITAs mission is to protect human health and environment while advancing U.S. national interests through international environmental collaboration.

Office of the Chief Financial Officer (66.202-66.203) The Immediate Office of the Chief Financial Officer performs the following functions: Develops, manages, and supports a goal-based management system for the Agency that involves strategic planning and accountability for environmental, fiscal, and managerial results and Manages the Agency-wide budget, resources management and financial management functions including program analysis and annual planning, budget formulation, preparation and execution; controls and systems for payroll and disbursements.

Region 1 (66.110) No Description Provided

Region 3 (66.050, 66.113)
EPAs Region 3 office protects human health and the environment in Delaware,
District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Region 4 (66.127-66.128) No Description Provided

Office of Research and Development (ORD) (66.509-66.511, 66.513-66.514, 66.516-66.517) The Office of Research and Development is responsible for a national research program in pursuit of technological controls of all forms of pollution. It directly supervises the research activities of EPA's national laboratories and gives technical policy direction to those laboratories that support the program responsibilities of EPA's regional offices. Close coordination of the various research programs is designed to yield a synthesis of knowledge from the biological, physical, and social sciences that can be interpreted in terms of total human and environmental needs. General functions include management of selected demonstration programs, planning for Agency environmental quality monitoring programs, coordination of Agency monitoring efforts with those of other Federal agencies, the States, and other public bodies, and dissemination of Agency research, development, and demonstration results.

Region 6 (66.124-66.125)
EPA's Region 6 protects human health and the environment in New Mexico,
Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana.

Region 9 (66.126, 66.600) EPA provides financial assistance grants to qualified applicants to support a variety of environmental programs and activities. EPA Region 9 works within the context of EPA's national grants program to provide funding opportunities specific to EPA's Pacific Southwest Region.

Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (66.801-66.802, 66.804-66.806, 66.808-66.810, 66.812-66.818) Provides policy, guidance, and direction for EPA's hazardous waste and emergency response programs. The functions of these programs include development of policies, standards, and regulations for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal; national management of the Superfund toxic waste cleanup program; development of guidelines for the emergency preparedness and "Community Right To Know" programs; development of guidelines and standards for underground storage tanks; enforcement of applicable laws and regulations; analysis of technologies and methods for the recovery of useful energy from solid waste; and provision of technical assistance in the development, management, and operation of waste management activities.

Region 10 (66.119-66.123)
EPA's Region 10 office serves Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and 271
Native Tribes. Our Regional Administrator is appointed by the President of the
United States to lead our staff of about 650 employees and oversee an annual
budget of about $500 million. Our main office is located in Seattle, Washington.

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART (68.001-68.999)

Office of Water (66.035, 66.418-66.419, 66.424, 66.432-66.433,

The National Gallery's collections embrace every major school of western European art from the 13th century to the present and of American art from

AGENCY INDEX SUMMARY

colonial days to the present. A professor-in-residence position is filled annually by a distinguished scholar in the field of art history; graduate and postgraduate research is conducted under a fellowship program; programs for children and the general public are conducted daily; and Extension Programs produces and distributes education resources for loan throughout the world; audiovisual materials include films, slide teaching programs, videocassettes, videodiscs, and CD-ROMS.

OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION (70.001-70.999)

Offers United States investors assistance in finding investment opportunities, insurance, and loans and loan guaranties to help finance their projects in developing countries. It encourages investment projects that will help the social and economic development of these countries.

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (77.001-77.999)

materials, and ensures the security of vital departmental nuclear assets. It provides policy and technical assistance to curb global proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, emphasizing U.S. nonproliferation, arms control, and nuclear safety objectives in the states of the former Soviet union and worldwide. Further, it develops and ensures the safety and reliability of nuclear reactor plants to power U.S. Navy warships. DOE is an environmental remediation enterprise. It cleans up the 50-year environmental legacy left at the industrial complexes where nuclear weapons were designed and manufactured. It manages the problems associated with the large quantities of various types of radioactive wastes, surplus nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels that remain at the sites of the Nation's nuclear weapons facilities and at nuclear energy research and development sites. In addition, it must address the growing inventory of spent nuclear fuel from commercial nuclear reactors that is awaiting disposal. These wastes must be dealt with responsibly to ensure the safety and health of the public. DOE is a science and technology enterprise. At the center of all we do are our 27 laboratories, our additional scientific user facilities, and our researchers at the Nation's universities. These form the backbone of U.S. scientific leadership by conducting and facilitating breakthrough research in energy sciences and technology, high energy physics, global climate change, genomics, superconducting materials, accelerator technologies, environmental sciences, and super-computing in support of DOE's mission. The laboratories, described as the crown jewels of the Nation's science establishment, and the Department's funding of research at universities have resulted in 66 Nobel prize winners, including three in 1996. The Department is also an investor in the Nation's most precious resource - its youth - by supporting science and mathematics education in our schools through grants, educational programs, and fellowships. DOE is global enterprise. The outcome of our work is thetechnology that stimulates the private market for the expansion of clean energy to meet national and global energy requirements of almost 500 quadrillion Btu's by the year 2010 - a staggering 36 percent increase over 1995. Overseas energy market needs include coal, nuclear power, oil and gas exploration, energy efficiency, and renewable energy technologies that are available for export now or that will soon be available for the international marketplace. DOE supports the export of U.S. energy services and technologies by assisting the nations in Asia, South America, Eastern Europe, an Africa, and the states of the former Soviet Union in developing private markets for environmentally responsible, sustainable energy. These alliances support U.S. competitiveness in a global economy of growing energy infrastructure requirements and create jobs in the U.S. at all skill levels.

Licenses and regulates the civilian uses of nuclear energy to protect the public health and safety and the environment. It does this by licensing persons and companies to build and operate nuclear reactors and other facilities and to own and use nuclear materials. The NCR makes rules and sets standards for these types of licenses. The NRC also carefully inspects the activities of the persons and companies licensed to ensure that they do not violate the safety rules of the Commission.

COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION (78.001-78.999)

Promotes healthy economic growth, protects the rights of customers, and ensures fairness and integrity in the marketplace through regulation of futures trading. To this end it also engages in the analysis of economic issues affected by or affecting futures trading.

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (81.001-81.999)

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (84.001-84.999)

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DOE is major government enterprise. If included among the Nation's Fortune 500 firms, it would rank in the top 50. Its $16.5 billion appropriation comprises close to 3 percent of total Federal discretionary spending DOE Funds the largest environmental cleanup in history, and research and development that supports the Nation's defense and its energy and economic security. DOE employs over 11,000 Federal employees and about 108,000 contract employees. DOE owns and manages over 50 major installations located on 2.4 million acres in 35 States and is the fourth largest Federal landowner in the United States. DOE is an energy policy, supply, and technology enterprise. It invests in developing a secure, clean, and sustainable energy system. It helps the Nation meet its environmental challenges by administering the largest pollution prevention and efficiency program in the world, with partners from every sector of the economy. It enhances the Nation's energy security by increasing the diversity of energy, and fuel choices and sources; bringing renewable energy sources into the market, strengthening domestic production of oil and gas, maintaining the U.S. nuclear energy option, and increasing the efficiency with which we use energy and generate electricity. The Department also maintains the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and operates five Power Marketing Administrations that sell and distribute over $3 billion of electric power generated at Federal hydroelectric plants. DOE is a national security enterprise. It is a key player in the Administration's furtherance of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty and its overall goal of reducing the global danger from nuclear weapons. It ensures the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. At the same time, it manages and safely dismantles excess nuclear

Administers programs designed to fund activities that assist students with limited English proficiency and minority languages populations by providing support for programs, activities, and management initiatives meeting the special educational needs of those populations. Provides national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and improving education. The Office is responsible for conducting and supporting education-related research activities; monitoring the state of education through the collection and analysis of statistical data; promoting the use and application of research and development to improve instructional practices in the classroom; and disseminating these findings to States and local education entities. The Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education formulates policy for, directs, and coordinates the activities relating to preschool, elementary, and secondary education. Included are programs of grants to State educational agencies and local school districts, postsecondary schools, and nonprofit organizations for State and local reform, compensatory, migrant, and Indian education; drug-free schools; other school improvement programs; and impact aid. The Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education formulates policy, directs, and coordinates programs for assistance to postsecondary educational institutions and students pursuing a postsecondary education. Programs include assistance for the improvement and expansion of American educational resources for international studies and services, grants to improve instruction in crucial academic subjects, and construction assistance for academic facilities. The Office is headed by the

AGENCY INDEX SUMMARY

Provides national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and improving education. The Office is responsible for conducting and supporting education-related research activities; monitoring the state of education through the collection and analysis of statistical data; promoting the use and application of research and development to improve instructional practices in the classroom; and disseminating these findings to States and local education entities.

Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (84.004, 84.010-84.011, 84.013, 84.040-84.041, 84.060, 84.141, 84.144, 84.149, 84.184, 84.196, 84.256, 84.283, 84.299, 84.330, 84.356, 84.358, 84.360, 84.362, 84.365-84.369, 84.371, 84.374, 84.377, 84.403, 84.415-84.416) The Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education formulates policy for, directs, and coordinates the activities relating to preschool, elementary, and secondary education. Included are programs of grants to State educational agencies and local school districts, postsecondary schools, and nonprofit organizations for State and local reform, compensatory, migrant, and Indian education; drug-free schools; other school improvement programs; and impact aid.

Department's Chief Operating Officer and is the Federal Government's first performance based organization. The Office directs and coordinates activities that provide financial assistance through grants and work and loan programs to students pursuing a postsecondary education. Federal student financial aid programs include Stafford Loans, Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS), Supplemental Loans to Students (SLS), Federal Insured Student Loans (FISL), consolidated loans, Perkins Loans, income contingent loans, Pell Grants, College Work-Study, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG), and State Student Incentives Grants (SSIG). The Office provides leadership and direction for the Department in meeting its goals of excellence in credit management and debt collection through the collection of defaulted loans under the Guaranteed Student Loan Program and the Law Enforcement Education Program, and the collection of overpayments in the Pell Grant Program and Supplemental Educational Opportunities Program. The Assistant Secretary for Vocational and Adult Education administers programs of grants, contracts, and technical assistance for vocational and technical education, and for adult education and literacy. The Office is also responsible for coordinating these programs with other Education Department and Federal programs supporting services and research for adult education, literacy, and occupational training. The Secretary of Education advises the President on education plans, policies, and programs of the Federal government. The Secretary directs Department staff in carrying out the approved programs and activities of the Department and promotes general public understanding of the Department's goals, programs, and objectives. The Secretary also carries out certain Federal responsibilities for four federally aided corporations: The American Printing House of the Blind, Gallaudet University, Howard University, and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Provides leadership to ensure that people with disabilities have services, resources, and equal opportunities to learn, work, and live as fully integrated, contributing members of society. The Office coordinates the activities of the Office of Special Education Programs, which works to help States provide quality educational opportunities and early intervention services to help students with disabilities achieve their goals. Through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Office supports State vocational rehabilitation programs that give disabled people the education, job training, and job placement services they need to gain meaningful employment. Programs include support for training of teachers and other professional personnel; grants for research; financial aid to help States initiate, expand, and improve their resources; and media services and captioned films for the deaf. Each regional office serves as a center for the dissemination of information and provides technical assistance to State and local educational agencies and other institutions and individuals interested in Federal education activities. At present, offices are located in 10 cities: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Kansas City, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Seattle.

Office of English Language Acquisition (84.293) The Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students helps children who are limited in their English, including immigrant children and youth, attain English proficiency, develop high levels of academic attainment in English, and meet the same challenging State academic content and student academic achievement standards that all children are expected to meet.

Office of Human Resources and Administration (84.145)

No Description Provided

Office of Innovation and Improvement (84.165, 84.215, 84.282, 84.295, 84.336, 84.350-84.351, 84.354, 84.361, 84.363, 84.370, 84.411) The Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII) oversees competitive grant programs that support innovations in the educational system and disseminates the lessons learned from these innovative practices. OII also helps coordinate policies related to parental options and choice. OII administers, coordinates, and recommends programs and policy for improving the quality of activities designed to support and test innovations throughout the K12 system in areas such as parental choice, teacher quality, use of technology in education, and arts in education. OII encourages the establishment of charter schools through

Institute of Education Sciences (84.305, 84.324, 84.372) The Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002 established a new organization within the U.S. Department of Education, the Institute of Education Sciences. Our mission is to provide rigorous evidence on which to ground education practice and policy. By identifying what works, what doesnt, and why, we intend to improve the outcomes of education for all students, particularly those at risk of failure. The Institute funds hundreds of research studies on ways to improve academic achievement, conducts large-scale evaluations of federal education programs and reports a wide array of statistics on the condition of education such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress. We support the building of an infrastructure for evidence-based education through activities such as grants to states to develop longitudinal data systems. We disseminate evidence on education to the public and practitioners through the What Works Clearinghouse and the ERIC education database, conferences, publications and products and 10 regional education laboratories and 10 national research and development centers.

Office of Postsecondary Education (84.015-84.018, 84.021-84.022, 84.031, 84.042, 84.044, 84.047, 84.066, 84.103, 84.116, 84.120, 84.153, 84.170, 84.200, 84.217, 84.220, 84.229, 84.269, 84.274, 84.334-84.335, 84.378, 84.382, 84.407, 84.414) The Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education formulates policy, directs, and coordinates programs for assistance to postsecondary educational institutions and students pursuing a postsecondary education. Programs include assistance for the improvement and expansion of American educational resources for international studies and services, grants to improve instruction in crucial academic subjects, and construction assistance for academic facilities.

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Office of Educational Research and Improvement (84.287)

AGENCY INDEX SUMMARY

(85.1-85.99)

Awards college scholarships of up to $5 thousand annually for 4 years to persons who demonstrate outstanding potential for and who are preparing to pursue a career in public service.

84.246, 84.250, 84.264-84.265, 84.275, 84.315, 84.323, 84.325-84.329, 84.343, 84.373, 84.380) Provides leadership to ensure that people with disabilities have services, resources, and equal opportunities to learn, work, and live as fully integrated, contributing members of society. The Office coordinates the activities of the Office of Special Education Programs, which works to help States provide quality educational opportunities and early intervention services to help students with disabilities achieve their goals. Through the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Office supports State vocational rehabilitation programs that give disabled people the education, job training, and job placement services they need to gain meaningful employment. Programs include support for training of teachers and other professional personnel; grants for research; financial aid to help States initiate, expand, and improve their resources; and media services and captioned films for the deaf.

JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION (85.500-85.599)

Fellowships are awarded that seek to strengthen secondary school teaching of the principles, framing, and development of the U.S. Constitution. The program works to contribute to a deeper understanding of American government and to foster in both teachers and students the spirit of civic participation that inspired the Nation's founders.

MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION (85.700-85.799)

Office of Student Financial Assistance Programs (84.007, 84.033, 84.063, 84.268) The Office is headed by the Department's Chief Operating Officer and is the Federal Government's first performance based organization. The Office directs and coordinates activities that provide financial assistance through grants and work and loan programs to students pursuing a postsecondary education. Federal student financial aid programs include Stafford Loans, Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS), Supplemental Loans to Students (SLS), Federal Insured Student Loans (FISL), consolidated loans, Perkins Loans, income contingent loans, Pell Grants, College Work-Study, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG), and State Student Incentives Grants (SSIG). The Office provides leadership and direction for the Department in meeting its goals of excellence in credit management and debt collection through the collection of defaulted loans under the Guaranteed Student Loan Program and the Law Enforcement Education Program, and the collection of overpayments in the Pell Grant Program and Supplemental Educational Opportunities Program.

The Millennium Challence Corporation (MCC) forms partnerships with some of the worlds poorest countries, but only those committed to: good governance, economic freedom, and investments in their citizens. MCC provides these well-performing countries with large-scale grants to fund country-led solutions for reducing poverty through sustainable economic growth. MCC grants complement other U.S. and international development programs.

MORRIS K. UDALL FOUNDATION (85.400-85.499)

Scholarships, internships, and fellowships are financed by a permanent trust fund endowment. Programs are designed to develop increased opportunities for Americans to prepare for and pursue careers related to the environment and for Native Americans and Alaska Natives to pursue careers in health care and tribal public policy.

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION (85.600-85.699)

Office of Vocational and Adult Education (84.002, 84.048, 84.051, 84.101, 84.191, 84.245, 84.259, 84.331) The Assistant Secretary for Vocational and Adult Education administers programs of grants, contracts, and technical assistance for vocational and technical education, and for adult education and literacy. The Office is also responsible for coordinating these programs with other Education Department and Federal programs supporting services and research for adult education, literacy, and occupational training.

BARRY GOLDWATER SCHOLARSHIP AND EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION FOUNDATION (85.200-85.299)

The Smithsonian Institution is an independent trust instrumentality of the United States which comprises the world?s largest museum and research complex. The Smithsonian includes 19 museums and galleries, the National Zoo, and research facilities in several States and the Republic of Panama. It holds more than 136 million artifacts and specimens in its trust for the American people. The Smithsonian is dedicated to public education, national service, and scholarship in the arts, science, history, and culture. The Smithsonian Institution was created by an act of Congress on August 10, 1846 (20 U.S.C. 41 et seq.), to carry out the terms of the will of British scientist James Smithson (1765?1829), who in 1826 had bequeathed his entire estate to the United States ?to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.? On July 1, 1836, Congress accepted the legacy and pledged the faith of the United States to the charitable trust. In September 1838, Smithson?s legacy, which amounted to more than 100,000 gold sovereigns, was delivered to the mint at Philadelphia, Congress vested responsibility for administering the trust in the Secretary of the Smithsonian and the Smithsonian Board of Regents, composed of the Chief Justice, the Vice President, three Members of the Senate, three Members of the House of Representatives, and nine citizen members appointed by joint resolution of Congress.

Established in 1983 to honor former Senator Barry Goldwater through the operation of an education scholarship program, financed by a permanent trust fund endowment, designed to encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in mathematics, the natural sciences, and engineering.

CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION (85.100-85.199)

Established by Congress in 1992 to award fellowships to encourage and support research, study, and labor designed to produce new discoveries in all fields of endeavor for the benefit of mankind.

WOODROW WILSON INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR SCHOLARS (85.300-85.399)

Established by Congress in 1968 to honor the legacy and ideals of Woodrow

HARRY S TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION

AGENCY INDEX SUMMARY

Records Administration.

Wilson by promoting research and dialogue on issues that link the world of scholarship and the world of public affairs. The Center achieves this mission through sustaining a community of scholars in Washington, and through sponsoring a regular program of meetings on the humanities and international affairs. The Center welcomes scholars of every nationality and from a wide variety of backgrounds including government, the corporate world, the professions, and academe.

BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS (90.500-90.599)

PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION (86.001-86.999)

The Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) encompases all U.S. civilian international broadcasting, including the Voice of America (VOA), Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), Radio Free Asia (RFA), Radio and TV Marti, and the Middle East Broadcasting Networks (MBN) -- Radio Sawa and Alhurra Television. BBG broadcasters distribute programming in 59 languages to an estimated weekly audience of 171 million people via radia, TV, the Internet and other news media. The BBG works to serve as an example of a free and professional press, reaching a worldwide audience with new, information, and relevant discussions.

DELTA REGIONAL AUTHORITY (90.200-90.299)

The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation guarantees payment of nonforfeitable pension benefits in covered, private-sector-defined benefit pension plans. Title IV of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (29 U.S.C. 1301 et seq.) provides for coverage of most private-sector-defined benefit pension plans that provide a benefit based on factors such as age, years of service, and average or highest salary. The Corporation administers two benefit insurance programs separately covering single-employer and multi-employer plans. Nearly 40 million workers participate in more than 112,000 covered plans. Single-Employer Insurance: Under the single-employer program, the Corporation guarantees payment of a covered plan's basic benefits if that plan terminates without sufficient assets to pay those guaranteed benefits. Multi-employer Insurance: Under Title IV of the Act, as originally enacted, the Corporation guaranteed nonforfeitable benefits for multi-employer plans in a similar fashion as for single-employer plans. However, the payment of guaranteed benefits was at the agency's discretion under the provisions of the law that remained in force until August 1, 1980. The Multi-employer Pension Plan Amendments Act of 1980 (29 U.S.C. 1001) revised the law applicable to multi-employer pension plans by changing the insurable event from plan termination to plan insolvency. In accordance with the Act, the Corporation provides financial assistance to plans that are unable to pay basic benefits. The plans are obligated to repay such assistance. The act also made employers withdrawing from a plan liable to the plan for a portion of its unfunded vested benefits. Premium Collections: All defined benefit pension plans covered by Title IV of Employee Retirement Income Security Act are required to pay premiums under prescribed rates to the Corporation.

To assist the eight-state, 240-county Mississippi Delta region in obtaining the transportation and basic public infrastructure, skills training, and opportunities for economic development essential to strong local economies. The DRA was created as a Federal-State partnership. DRA will focus on: basic public infrastructure in distressed counties and isolated area of distress; transportation infrastructure facilitating the economic development of the region; business development; and job training or employment-related education.

DENALI COMMISSION (90.100-90.199)

Created by Congress in 1998, the Denali Commission is the Federal government and the State of Alaska working together to assist the most remote of American citizens to help themselves move closer to economic self-sufficiency, while preserving ancient cultural values and new opportunities to people living in American's last frontier. With the creation of the Denali Commission, Congress acknowledged the need for increased inter-agency cooperation and focus on these remote communities. This Federal-State partnership is intended to promote rural development, provide power generation and transmission facilities, modern communication systems, water and sewer systems and other infrastructure needs.

ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD (88.001-88.999)

JAPAN U.S. FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION (90.300-90.399)

Ensures compliance to Federal laws requiring accessibility for physically handicapped persons in certain federally funded buildings and facilities throughout the Nation. This includes setting guidelines and requirements for accessibility standards prescribed by Federal agencies, providing technical assistance to organizations agencies and individuals requesting help in solving accessible design and construction problems, and conducting research to determine appropriate specifications for accessibility.

The Japan-United States Friendship Act of 1975 established the Japan-United States Friendship Trust Fund and created the Japan-United States Friendship Commission to make grants for the promotion of scholarly, cultural, and artistic activities between Japan and the United States. The Commission is authorized to make expenditures from the fund in an amount not to exceed 5 percent annually of the fund's original principal to pay Commission expenses and make grants to support Japanese studies in American universities, policy oriented research, faculty and other professional exchanges, public affairs programs, and other cultural and educational activities primarily in the United States.

NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION (89.001-89.999)

NORTHERN BORDER REGIONAL COMMISSION (90.601-90.699)

Establishes policies and procedures for managing the records of the United States Government. NARA assists Federal agencies in adequately documenting their activities, administering their records management programs, scheduling their records, and retiring their noncurrent records to Federal Records Centers. The mission of the National Archives and Records Administration is to ensure, for the Citizen and the public servant, for the President and the Congress and the Courts, ready access to essential evidence. Managing the Presidential Libraries system, assisting the National Historical Publications and Records Commission in its grant program for State and local records and edited publications of prominent Americans, and publishing the laws, regulations, Presidential, and other public documents are also key functions of the National Archives and

The Northern Border Regional Commission is a Federal-State governmental agency concerned with the economic well-being of the citizens and businesses within a thirty-six (36) county region of Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont (12 counties in Maine; 4 counties in New Hampshire, 14 counties in New York, and 6 counties in Vermont). The region served by the Commission has had chronic and contiguous long-term economic distress. The mission of the

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