Page images
PDF
EPUB

$59, 130.00

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 10,000.00
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix F 13.)

14. Shrewsbury River, New Jersey.-When the present project for this improvement was adopted, in 1879, the river was obstructed by a number of shifting sand-bars, which had caused the complete suspension of navigation in the South Branch and only permitted the passage of vessels engaged in commerce up the North Branch at or near high water. A considerable trade was carried on, however, even under these difficult conditions.

The originally adopted project for the improvement was to dredge a channel 6 feet deep at mean low water, and from 300 to 150 feet in width, across the shoals from the mouth to Red Bank, on the North Branch, 8 miles, and Branchport, on the South Branch, 9 miles, maintaining these channels by longitudinal dikes. This project has not been modified as to the end sought, but estimates of the diking, dredging, and cost have been increased from time to time.

The amount expended on this project to the end of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890, was $214,292.88.

With this amount numerous dikes have been built and channels dredged at various places 6 feet deep and from 25 to 100 feet wide. These improvements have resulted in a marked increase in the com

merce.

The work done during the fiscal year consisted in the construction of 372 linear feet of sheet-pile dike in the North Branch and the removal by dredging of 11,045 cubic yards of material, in redredging the channel of the South Branch to a depth of 6 feet at mean low water. The amount expended during the fiscal year is $4,205.22.

The commerce of the river was reported for the calendar year 1889 to be 526,000 tons; this has increased to 556,500 tons for the calendar year 1890.

July 1, 1890, balance unexpended...

Amount appropriated by act approved September 19, 1890..

$207.12 10,000.00

[blocks in formation]

July 1, 1891, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.

3,986,50

4,786.50

July 1, 1891, balance available.

1,215.40

30, 062.00

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project......
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 23, 000, 00
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix F 14.)

15. Manasquan (Squan) River, New Jersey.-In its original condition this stream had a depth of from 4 to 6 feet at mean low water for several miles above its mouth; but was obstructed at its outlet into the ocean by a sand spit, which had deflected the stream into a channel parallel with the beach communicating with the ocean across shifting sand-bars, on which the best depth did not exceed 12 feet at mean low water; mean range of tide 2.4 feet. In severe storms this channel was sometimes entirely closed by the sand, remaining so until the fresh

water in the river had accumulated sufficiently to force a new outlet. Under these conditions the river could not be used by commerce.

The project for its improvement was adopted in 1879, and contemplated dredging the lower river, and obtaining by means of jetties a permanent outlet nearly at right angles to the beach, with a depth of 6 feet at mean low water, at an estimated cost of $52,120. This was increased to $72,000, in 1882, the increase being due to advanced prices and to a proposed increase in the length of the jetties.

The amount expended under this project to June 30, 1890, was $39,000.

With this amount two jetties had been constructed, but neither to its full length, appropriations having ceased in 1882. No permanent improvement had been effected.

An appropriation of $2,000 was made in the act of September 19, 1890, to be expended in the removal of obstructions placed by the Government at the mouth of the river, if, in the discretion of the Secretary of War the same should be done. There were no expenditures on account of this work during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, as the removal of the obstructions alluded to in the act of September 19, 1890, was, in the opinion of the engineer in charge, deemed unnecessary, and so reported under date of December 19, 1890, and was approved by the Secretary of War December 30, 1890.

Amount appropriated by act approved September 19, 1890..
July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project ....... Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix F 15.)

$2,000.00

2,000.00

31,000.00

16. Removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation. The barge Nellie, in discharging cargo at Elizabethport, N. J., broke apart in the middle and sank. She was raised by the owners and the cargo removed, and subsequently abandoned, and reported by Mr. D. C. Chase, superintendent of the Pennsylvania Railroad Towing Line, on July 23, 1890, as an obstruction to navigation.

Authority for the removal of this wreck was obtained August 2, 1890, and after due advertisement by circular letter it was removed on September 19, in a very thorough manner, by the Baxter Wrecking Company, at a cost of $200.

(See Appendix F 16.)

EXAMINATIONS AND SURVEY FOR IMPROVEMENT, TO COMPLY WITH REQUIREMENTS OF RIVER AND HARBOR ACT APPROVED SEPTEMBER 19, 1890.

The required preliminary examination of Princess Bay, Staten Island, New York, for breakwater, was made by the local engineer in charge, Captain Casey, and report thereon submitted through Col. Henry L. Abbot, Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer, Northeast Division. It is the opinion of Captain Casey, and of the Division Engineer, based upon the facts and reasons given, that this locality is not worthy of improvement. This opinion being concurred in by me, no further survey was ordered. The report was transmitted to Congress and printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 109, Fifty-first Congress, second session. (See also Appendix F 17.)

The required preliminary examination of Hackensack River, New

Jersey, from below the Newark and New York Railroad Bridge, on Newark Bay, to the town of Hackensack, was made by the local engineer in charge, Captain Casey, and report thereon submitted through Col. Henry L. Abbot, Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer, Northeast Division. It is the opinion of Captain Casey, and of the Division Engineer, based upon the facts and reasons given, that this locality is worthy of improvement. This opinion being concurred in by me, Captain Casey was charged with and has completed its survey, and submitted report thereon. The proposed improvement below the Newark and New York Railroad Bridge contemplates the dredging of a crossover channel to a width of 200 feet and depth of 10 feet at mean low water from the east (ebb) channel, which passes through the draw span of the bridge to the west (flood) channel; the cost of excavating this cross channel is estimated at $2,500.

The improvement of the upper river, proposed in report of June 30, 1889 (printed in Annual Report, Chief of Engineers, 1889, page 842), on survey of Hackensack River from the lower bridge at the town of Hackensack to the Erie Railway Bridge, contemplates dredging a channel 10 feet deep at mean low water and 200 feet wide from Little Ferry to Gasworks Creek, and 150 feet wide from that point to the lower bridge at Hackensack; the cost of this work was estimated at $60,000. Captain Casey, in his report of September 5, 1891, on the survey, states:

In comparison with the upper reaches of the river, as described in my previous report, the lower river is, however, not in need of improvement at present, and it is recommended that any money which may be appropriated be expended on that portion of the river between the lower bridge in the town of Hackensack and the Erie Railway Bridge.

(See Appendix F 18.)

IMPROVEMENT OF DELAWARE RIVER, PENNSYLVANIA AND NEW JERSEY, SCHUYLKILL RIVER, PENNSYLVANIA, AND RIVERS IN SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY; HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS IN DELAWARE RIVER AND BAY; CONSTRUCTION OF PIER AT LEWES, DELAWARE; DELAWARE BREAKWATER, DELAWARE.

Officer in charge, Maj. C. W. Raymond, Corps of Engineers; Division Engineer, Col. Wm. P. Craighill, Corps of Engineers.

1. Delaware River, Pennsylvania and New Jersey -Trenton, the head of natural navigation on the Delaware River, is about 30 miles above the upper part of the port of Philadelphia. In its original condition this part of the river was obstructed by shoals at the following localities: Between Bordentown and Trenton, a distance of about 5 miles, a narrow and circuitous channel existed which carried from 3 to 6 feet at mean low water; at Kinkora Bar, about 9 miles below Treuton, a shoal carrying from 7 to 8 feet, and at Five Mile Bar, at the upper part of Philadelphia, a shoal across the Pennsylvania channel carrying only 3 or 4 feet at mean low water, there being, however, 13 feet of water past Five Mile Bar in the New Jersey channel, passing south of Petty Island.

Below Philadelphia the river, in its original condition, presented obstructions at Mifflin Bar, which reduced the depth at mean low water to 17 feet, at Schooner Ledge and Cherry Island Flats to 18 feet, at Bulkhead Shoals and Dan Baker Shoal to about 20 feet.

In that part of the Delaware River between Trenton, N. J., and Bridesburg, Pa., efforts in the past have been directed toward relieving com

merce from the obstructions which exist in the upper 9 miles of the river, or that part between Kinkora Bar and Trenton. A detailed survey of the river between Bridesburg and Trenton has been made for the purpose of obtaining the necessary data for determining upon a plan for the improvement of the river between Trenton and the upper part of Philadelphia to meet the requirements of commerce.

Previous to 1885 the efforts to improve the river between Philadel phia and the bay have been confined to dredging, except at Schooner Ledge, where solid rock has been removed, under appropriations for special localities, and also under general appropriations for the Delaware River below Bridesburg.

A Board of Engineers, convened by direction of the Secretary of War for the purpose of considering the subject of the permanent improvement of Delaware River and Bay, recommended, under date of January 23, 1885, the formation of a ship channel from a point opposite Philadelphia and about midway between the American Shipbuilding Company's yard and the Gas Trust Wharf to deep water in Delaware Bay, having a least width of 600 feet and a depth of 26 feet at mean low water. The formation of such a channel is to be obtained, except at Schooner Ledge, where rock would require to be removed, by regulating the tidal flow by means of dikes, with recourse to dredging where necessary as an aid to such contracting and regulating works. The estimated cost of obtaining a channel of the above dimensions is about $2,425,000, which covers the estimated cost of the permanent improvement of the Delaware River between the upper part of Philadelphia and deep water in the bay. This estimate of cost does not include the improvement of Philadelphia Harbor, which is a separate project. With the present requirements of commerce above Philadelphia it is not considered that the part of the river lying between Trenton and Bridesburg demands any improvement beyond the formation of a 12-foot navigable channel across Kinkora Bar.

The entire amount expended on the improvement of the Delaware River from 1836 to June 30, 1890, under appropriations both for special localities and the general river, was $1,942,941.78, of which $104,132.84 was expended on that part of the river between Trenton and the upper part of Philadelphia. As a result of this expenditure there had been formed at the latter date a channel of navigable width and 74 feet deep at mean low water through the bars between Bridesburg and Bordentown; a channel across Five Mile Bar 113 feet deep, and past the bar, between its south side and Petty Island a channel 9 feet deep; a channel from 200 to 400 feet wide and from 24 to 26 feet deep through the shoal areas at Port Richmond; a channel across Mifflin Bar from 150 to 250 feet wide and from 24 to 26 feet deep; a channel through Schooner Ledge 330 feet wide and 24 feet deep, except over a small area discovered in 1889 where the depth is reduced to 23 feet at mean low water; a channel through Cherry Island Flats from 200 to 450 feet wide and from 24 to 26 feet deep, and a channel across Bulkhead Shoal 600 feet wide and from 20 to 21 feet deep.

The channel between Philadelphia and Camden, across Smith Island Bar, had been improved by the formation of a dredged cut protected by revetment, so as to give a channel 100 feet wide with a minimum depth of 6 feet at mean low water.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, the sum of $37,417.77, which includes the liabilities outstanding June 30, 1890, was expended in surveys, examinations, and in dike corstruction and dredging at Kinkora and Bulkhead Bars; making a total expenditure since 1836

of $1,980,359.55, of which $628,359.55 has been expended on present project.

The changes which have resulted during the past fiscal year are summarized as follows: At Kinkora Bar, 600 linear feet of pile and stone and 200 linear feet of stone and mud dike were built, partly closing the slough south of Newbold Island, and a channel about 175 feet wide and 12 feet deep at mean low water was dredged across the bar; this channel for a width of 150 feet now carries a depth of 93 feet at mean low water. At Five Mile Bar a channel about 150 feet wide and 13 feet deep at mean low water exists, which is the result of the action of the dike between Fisher Point and Petty Island, as completed during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890. At Mifflin Bar the channel carries a depth of from 24 to 26 feet at mean low water in a channel from 175 to 275 feet wide; the dike at Mifflin Bar was completed to the plane of mean low water in 1888, except for a gap of 400 feet, which serves as an entrance to the dumping basin, and its action upon the channel dredged through the bar in the fall of 1888 shows that the effect of the dike, though manifest upon the bar, will probably have to be increased by raising the dike in the future to a greater height above the plane of mean low water. At Bulkhead Bar the east dike, which has been in progress of construction during the past fiscal year, has reached a length of 2,600 feet; its extension has not yet been sufficient to affect the channel over the bar, and as a temporary relief to commerce a channel about 200 feet wide and 24 feet deep at mean low water is now being dredged. The channels at Schooner Ledge and Cherry Island Flats have remained unchanged from their condition as reported for the previous fiscal year. No extension has been made during the year to the dike at Reedy Island, which is intended for the improvement of Dan Baker Shoal.

July 1, 1890, balance unexpended .......

Amount appropriated by act approved September 19, 1890..

June 30, 1891, amount expended during fiscal year....

$69,058. 22 240,000.00

309, 058. 22 37, 417.77

271,640. 45

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended
July 1, 1-91, outstanding liabilities..

$12, 203. 51

July 1, 1891, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.... 72, 563. 82

85, 367.33

July 1, 1891, balance available

186, 273. 12

(Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project..... Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

Submitted incompliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix G 1.)

1,725,000.00

100,000.00

2. Harbor between Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Camden, New Jersey. The islands in the Delaware River between Philadelphia and Camden compel the flood and ebb currents to pursue different paths, narrow the existing channels, and prevent the extension of wharves necessary for the purposes of commerce. The plan of improvement adopted by Congress provides for the removal of Smith and Windmill islands and a part of Petty Island, and the formation of a channel of ample depth and about 2,000 feet in width from Kaighn Point to to Fisher Point. The project contemplates the advance of wharves and bulkheads on both the Philadelphia and Camden shores during the

« PreviousContinue »