Quantitative Eco-nomics: How sustainable are our economies?

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Springer Science & Business Media, 2008 M04 19 - 329 pages

“Quantitative Eco-nomics” cuts through the fog of vision and advocacy by comparing and applying new quantitative tools of both environmental and ecological economics. Environmental accounts and empirical analyses provide operational concepts and measures of the sustainability of economic performance and growth. They facilitate rational and compatible environmental and economic policies.

This thought-provoking text raises doubts, however, about the measurability of sustainable development. Has the paradigm run its course? The answer is a guarded ‘yes’ – guarded because the concept still carries considerable environmental goodwill. At the same time the opaque concept fosters contradictory policy advice, or worse, inaction. Do we need zero- or accelerated economic growth? Should we reduce conspicuous consumption or enjoy spending as we see fit? Will rules and regulation or adjusted markets prevent environmental disaster?

 

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Contents

83 Case Studies
155
84 SEEA Revision
159
841 Accounting for Economic Sustainability?
160
842 Accounting for Ecological Sustainability?
162
843 Revising the Revision
164
Further Reading
165
Review and Exploration
166
Corporate Accounting Accounting for Accountability
169

222 From Mainstream Economics to Deep Ecology
23
223 Ecological Versus Environmental Economics
26
Maintaining Capital and Welfare
29
Assessing the Sustainability of Economic Growth
30
Cost Internalization CostBenefit Analysis Optimal Use of Natural Resources
32
Dematerialization
35
242 Material Throughput and Dematerialization
36
Further Reading
39
Review and Exploration
41
Sustainable Development Blueprint or Fig Leaf?
43
312 Which Countries Are Developing?
46
32 Towards an Operational Definition of Sustainable Development
48
322 From Sustainability to Feasibility of Development
51
323 Local Eco Development
52
33 Normative Economics for Sustainable Development?
54
332 Has the Paradigm Run Its Course?
55
Further Reading
57
Review and Exploration
59
Assessing the Physical Base of the Economy
61
Statistics and Indicators
62
412 Integrating Economic Environmental and SocialDemographic Statistics
69
42 From Statistics to Indicators for Sustainable Development
72
422 A Framework for Sustainable Development Indicators
74
Alert Action or Evaluation?
78
The Indicator of NonSustainable Development?
80
Further Reading
83
Review and Exploration
86
Aggregation From Indicators to Indices
87
512 Mathematical Tools of Information Reduction
90
513 Scientific Criteria of Aggregation
91
514 Empirical Commensurable Weighting
92
52 Indices of Environmental Sustainability and Sustainable Development
93
522 WellBeing Index WI
96
524 Ecological Footprint EF
97
Towards a Balanced Approach
100
Further Reading
102
Review and Exploration
103
Energy and Material Flow Accounting
105
62 Energy Accounting
106
621 Exergy Accounting
108
622 Emergy Accounting
110
623 Energy Theory of Value
112
63 Material Flow Accounting
113
631 Concepts Methods and Indicators
114
632 Results
117
Ton Ideology Early Warning or Policy Guide?
119
634 Physical InputOutput Tables
121
Further Reading
123
Review and Exploration
124
Greening the Economic Accounts
125
Linking the Physical and Monetary Accounts
127
711 Welfare Indicators
128
712 Comprehensive Wealth Measures
130
Incorporating Natures Assets
133
Expanding the Production Boundary
135
Further Reading
137
Review and Exploration
140
SEEA The System for Integrated Environmental and Economic Accounting
141
81 Pricing the Priceless
142
812 Maintenance Costing of Environmental Degradation
145
813 Contingent and Related Damage Valuation
147
82 SEEA Objectives Structure and Indicators
148
821 Accounting for Sustainability
150
822 Environmentally Adjusted Macroeconomic Indicators
151
823 Accounting for Policy Performance
153
912 Getting Physical or Monetary?
171
913 MicroMacro Link
174
92 From Accounting to Management
175
Further Reading
178
Review and Exploration
179
Analysis Modelling Sustainability
180
Diagnosis Has the Economy Behaved Sustainably?
183
Delinkage of Economic Output and Material Input
185
Has Economic Growth Been Sustainable?
186
102 What Are the Causes? Structural Analysis of Environmental Impact
188
1021 EnvironmentalEconomic Profiles
189
From Accounting to Modelling
190
The Driving Forces of Environmental Impacts
192
Further Reading
195
Review and Exploration
196
Prediction Will Economic Growth Be Sustainable?
197
Testing the Hypothesis
198
Rejecting the Hypothesis?
199
1113 Critique
201
The LimitstoGrowth Model
202
1122 Critique and Countercritique
205
Further Reading
208
Review and Exploration
209
Policy Analysis Can We Make Growth Sustainable?
211
1211 Environmental Cost Internalization in the Static Leontief Model
212
Greened GDP in InputOutput and CGE Models
214
A Linear Programming Approach
218
Optimality and Sustainability of Economic Growth
220
1232 Optimal Growth and Sustainability
222
1233 Some General Conclusions
224
Further Reading
226
Review and Exploration
227
Strategic Outlook
228
Tackling the Limits to Growth
231
Muddling Through
232
Curbing Economic Activity
233
EcoEfficiency
235
Ecological Tax Reform in Germany
243
Sufficiency Corporate Social Responsibility Environmental Ethics
245
Environmental Ethics
247
Further Reading
248
Review and Exploration
250
Globalization and Global Governance
251
141 Sustainability Effects of Globalization
252
142 Global Governance for Sustainable Development
254
1421 Greening the WTO
255
1422 Creating Countervailing Power
258
1423 Towards a Global Compact?
259
Further Reading
261
Review and Exploration
262
Questions Questions Questions and Some Answers
263
151 What Is the Problem?
264
153 How Bad Is It?
266
1532 How Bad Will It Be?
267
154 What Can Be Done?
268
155 Some Nonconclusive Answers
269
Annexes
272
Market Failure and Environmental Cost Internalization A Primer
275
I2 Internalizing Externalities
277
Economic Rent and Natural Resource Depletion
283
SEEA Germany A Pilot Case Study
285
References
289
Index
309
Colour Plates
317
Copyright

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Page xvi - UN United Nations UNCED United Nations Conference on Environment and Development UNCTAD United Nations Conference on Trade and Development UNDP United Nations Development Programme UNEP United Nations Environment Programme...
Page 8 - Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Such a level should be achieved within a time frame sufficient to allow ecosystems to adapt naturally to climate change, to ensure that food production is not threatened and to enable economic development to proceed in a sustainable manner.
Page xiv - GATS General Agreement on Trade in Services GATT General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade GDP gross domestic product...
Page 6 - The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) was adopted on 22 May 1992 in Nairobi. Kenya. On 5 June 1992, during the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED - the ''Earth Summit...

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