Greeks and Barbarians

Front Cover
Thomas Harrison
Taylor & Francis, 2002 - 336 pages
0 Reviews
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Note to the Reader -- Abbreviations -- Maps -- General Introduction -- HISTORICAL OVERVIEW -- THE ORGANISATION OF THIS VOLUME -- PART I: SOURCES -- Introduction to Part I -- 1 Herodotus the Tourist -- 2 Battle Narrative and Politics in Aeschylus' Persae -- 3 Greeks and Barbarians in Euripides' Tragedies: The End of Differences? -- 1 THE BARBARIAN: A REALITY ON STAGE? -- 2 THE BARBARIAN: A CHANT? -- 3 THE IMAGE OF THE BARBARIAN:REALITY OR FANTASY? -- 4 THE BARBARISM OF THE GREEKS -- 4 The Athenian Image of the Foreigner -- 1 THE DISTANT, THE PICTURESQUE, THE EXOTIC -- 2 EXPERIENCING THE OTHER -- 3 THE HOPLITE AND HIS DOUBLES -- 4 MYTHICAL USES OF THE 'OTHER' -- PART II: THEMES -- Introduction to Part II -- 5 When is a Myth Not a Myth? Bernal's 'Ancient Model -- THE ANCIENT MODEL -- SUBJECTIVE AND OBJECTIVE ETHNICITY -- DANA US -- COMPETITIVE GENEALOGIES -- ATHENIAN SOURCES -- FLUIDITY OF ETHNICITY IN MYTH -- ETHNICITY AS AN ARTICULATOROF ABSTRACTIONS -- CONCLUSION: MYTH AND HISTORY -- REFERENCES -- 6 The Greek Notion of Dialect -- 7 The Greek Attitude to Foreign Religions -- I -- II -- PART III: PEOPLES -- Introduction to Part III -- 8 History and Ideology: The Greeks and 'Persian Decadence' -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- V -- 9 The Greeks as Egyptologists -- WHAT IS EGYPT? -- WHAT IS TRUE CIVILISATION?WHERE IS THE REAL CITY? -- THE LAND OF RELIGION -- PART IV: OVERVIEWS -- Introduction to Part IV -- 10 The Problem of Greek Nationality -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- VI -- VII -- VIII -- 11 Greeks and Others: From Antiquity to the Renaissance -- 12 The Construction of the 'Other' -- 1 GREEKS AND BARBARIANS -- 1 Cultural contacts and the sense of a common Greek identity -- 2 Geography, ethnology and anthropology -- 3 The politicisation of the Greek/Barbarian contrast
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

General Introduction
1
3 the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden fig 4 the Museum
3
of Fine Arts Boston fig 5 the Archaeological Institute of
10
Introduction to Part I
17
t Herodotus the Tourist
24
The Athenian Image of the Foreigner
103
Introduction to Part II
127
When is a Myth Not a Myth? Bernals Ancient Model
133
The Greek Notion of Dialect
153
Introduction to Part III
189
The Greeks as Egyptologists
211
Introduction to Part IV
231
From Antiquity to the Renaissance
257
Intellectual Chronology
311
Index
328
Copyright

T
147

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page vii - Reader The articles and excerpts included in this book were originally published in a range of different journals and books. A degree of uniformity has been imposed (for example, in the abbreviations used), but many of the conventions of the original pieces have been preserved. This applies to spelling and punctuation (UK or US) and to different modes of referencing: chapters using the Harvard (ie name and date) system are followed by individual bibliographies; those using 'short titles' usually...
Page vii - Note to the Reader The articles and excerpts included in this book were originally published in a range of different journals and books. A degree of uniformity has been imposed (for example, in the abbreviations used), but many of the conventions of the original pieces have been preserved. This applies to spelling (UK or US) and to different modes of referencing: chapters using the Harvard (ie name and date) system are followed by individual bibliographies; those using 'short titles' usually have...
Page vii - Editorial notes and translations of ancient texts are introduced either within square brackets [ ] or in daggered footnotes f. Some Greek terms, especially those in use in English, have been transliterated. All abbreviations of ancient texts, modern collections, books and journals, used either in the chapters or in the editorial material, are listed and explained on pp.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2002)

Thomas Harrison is Lecturer in Ancient History, the University of St Andrews

Bibliographic information