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NB-3636 Armaly, M. F., Sch. Med., State Univ., Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. Pilot

study international collaboration on glaucoma. NB-3637 Barany, E. H., Sch. Med., Uppsala Univ., Uppsala, Sweden. Compara

tive study of glaucoma in monkey species. NB-3693 Gay, A. J., Sch. Med., Washington Univ., St. Louis, Mo. Projection

from minute retinal lesions to lateral geniculate nucleus. NB-3740 Talman, E. L., Med. Res. Fdn., Oregon, Portland, Oreg. Galactose

and lens metabolism. NB-3834 Haddad, H. M., Sch. Med., Washington Univ., St. Louis, Mo. Sialic

acids in the eye. NB-3841 Barber, A. N., Sch. Med., Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, La.

A study of genetic factors for blindness. NB-3888 Misiak, H., Grad. Sch., Fordham Univ., N.Y.C. Standardization of

the critical flicker frequency test. NB-3943 Lennox-Buchthal, M. A., Sch. Med., Univ. Copenhagen, Denmark.

Central nervous mechanisms in color vision. NB-3960 O'Connor, G. R., Sch. Med., Univ. California, Berkeley, Calif. The

separation and analysis of toxoplasma antigens. NB-4059 Goodner, E. K., Univ. California Med. Sch., Berkeley, Calif. Experi

mental lens-induced uveitis in rabbits. NB-4116 Feldman, G. L., Col. Med., Baylor Univ., Houston, Tex. Chemically

induced cataracts in the chick embryo. NB-4145 Rosenberg, B., Col. Sci., Arts, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing,

Mich. Electronic charge transport in visual systems. NB-4277 Feldman, G. L., Sch. Med., Baylor Univ., Houston, Tex. The lipids in

experimentally induced cataracts. NB_4282 Woodcock, R. W., Colorado State College, Greeley, Colo. Development

of an electronic brailling system. NB-4286 Braley, A. E., Sch. Med., State Univ., Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. Travel

fund for International Ophthalmology Congress. NB-4358 Rothstein, H., Col. Arts. Sci., Univ. Vermont, Burlington, Vt. In

vivo & in vitro studies of cell division & amino acid incorporation in the

ocular lens. NB-4393 Massopust, L. C., Psychiatric Res. Fdn., Cleveland, Ohio. Compari

sons of the retina and ERG in primates. NB-4521 Woodburne, L., Grad. Sch., Univ. Washington, Seattle, Wash. Visual

acuity, visual discrimination, and visual cortex of squirrel monkey. NB-4530 Gunter, R., Sch. Psychol., San Fernando Valley State C., Northridge,

Calif. The nature of primate color vision. NB-4576 Bender, M. B., Mount Sinai Hospital, N.Y.C. Effects of arousal on

human oculomotor function. NB-4590 Klein, D., Inst. de Genetique medicale, Geneva, Switzerland. Genetic

studies of tapetoretinal degenerations. NB-4591 Kern, H. L., Albert Einstein Col. Md., Yeshiva Univ., N.Y.C. Muco

proteins of the cornea. NB-4684 Cleasby, G. W., Presbyterian Med. Cr., San Francisco, Calif. Experi

mental modification of corneal graft reactions. NB-5021 Chick, E. W., West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, W. Va. Pathogenesis

of mycotic ulcerative keratis. RF-0025 Korc, I., Sch. Med., Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo, Uru.

guay. Biochemical studies on normal and cataractous lenses.

Bureau of State Services projects in vision and loss of vision

COMMUNITY HEALTH PROGRAM

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NEUROLOGICAL AND SENSORY DISEASES PROGRAM

N0102A63

July 1, 1963-
June 30, 1966

Elmar Lawaczeck, M.D.

Department of Ophthalmology,

University of Alabama Medical

Center.
Florida State Board of Health..

Community Glaucoma Evaluation

Service.

N1001C64.

Nathan J. Schneider, Ph.D.

Aug. 1, 1962-

July 31, 1965
Sept. 1, 1963-
Aug. 31, 1968

Laboratory Diagnosis of Chronic Eye

Disease Due to Toxoplasmosis.
Population Study of Glaucoma Tests

N1702B64.

Iowa State Department of Health Mansour F. Armaly, M. D.

Johns Hopkins University School

Frank B. Walsh, M.D.

Clinical Electroretinography.

1963
1964
1965
1962
1963
1964
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1964
1965
1966
1963
1964
1965
1962
1963
1964
1963
1964
1965
1966
1964
1965
1966
1962

15, 452
10, 300
8, 974
7, 300
6,600
6, 600
27, 672
21, 068
19, 480
20, 280
20, 780
12, 032

3, 200
2, 200
38, 050
37, 490
32, 400
10, 840
16, 800
16, 800
4, 108
1, 931
1, 900
1, 900
16, 500
9, 200
7, 700
71, 364

CH 40-46 A-64.

Apr. 1, 1961- | Pennsylvania State College of
Mar. 31, 1965 Optometry.

William G. Walton, Jr., 0.D.

1964

$11, 691

Appraisal of incidence of refractive

errors and increased ocular tension
in aged population with determina-
tion of approximate time involved.

N2204 A64.

Jan. 1, 1964-
Dec. 31, 1966

of Medicine.

N2301B64.

Dec. 1, 1962-
Feb. 28, 1966

Brookline Health Department.

Leon J. Taubenhaus, M.D.

N2402B63

Jan.

1, 1962-
Dec. 31, 1965

Visual Screening of 3- Through 5-

Year-Old Children.
Metropolitan Detroit Glaucoma

Screening Project.
Establishment of Eye Pathology

Laboratory.

Michigan Department of Health - John A. Cowan, M.D.

N3404 A 63

Sept. 1, 1963-
Aug. 31, 1967

The Research Foundation, State

University of New York.

William U. Delaney, M.D

N3408 A 64.

Expansion of Services of a Myopia

Clinic.

N3901 A 62

May 1, 1964- Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Brian J. Curtiss, M.D.
June 30, 1967 Hospital.
Sept. 1, 1962- Oregon State Board of Health. Julia C. Dickinson, M.D.

Dec. 31, 1964
Nov. 1, 1962- Baylor University College of Mary C. Fletcher. M.D.

Oct. 31, 1965 Medicine.
July 1, 1963- West Virginia University.

Robert R. Trotter, M.D.
Dec. 31, 1965

A Study of the Eye Problems of the

Aged in Oregon.
Orthoptic-Pleoptic Hospital Unit.

N4602063

1962
1963
1964
1963
1964

118,857
104, 781
88, 211
27, 995
21, 757

N5201 A63.

Continuing Glaucoma Detection Pro-

gram at West Virginia University.

NEUROLOGICAL AND SENSORY DISEASE SERVICE PROGRAM

VISION STUDIES

Contracts

Brooklyn Jewish Hospital, 1958–59: Glaucoma detection in a general clinic.

Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., 1959-60: A study to determine if the occurrence of glaucoma among blood relatives of patients with glaucoma was greater than among normal population group.

National Analysts, Philadelphia, Pa., 1961–62: A study of cataract patients to determine motivations in submitting to corrective surgery.

Johns Hopkins University, 1962: A study to test the effectiveness of the tonofilm as a barrier to bacteria and virus.

University of North Carolina, 1962–63: Followup experience of positive glaucoma screenees in North Carolina.

Michigan State Department of Health, 1962–63: A study of glaucoma case finding among relatives of persons known to be blind from chronic glaucoma.

American Bio-Chemical Co., Baltimore, Md., 1961-62: Develop and produce disposable sterile tonometer membranes.

Richard Rush Studio, Inc., Chicago, Ill., 1963: Develop and deliver plastic models of the human head to be used in the teaching of tonometry.

Marquette University School of Medicine, Wisconsin, 1962 to present: Plan, conduct, and analyze the results of a glaucoma screening study.

University of Tennessee College of Medicine, 1961 to present: Conduct a study of screening methods employed in glaucoma detection.

Howard University, Washington, D.C., 1964 to present: A study on the relationship between diabetes and glaucoma.

Permanente Medical Group, Oakland, Calif., 1962–64: A study of the validity of the MacKay-Marg tonometer as a screening instrument for early detection of chronic simple glaucoma.

Johns Hopkins University, University of California, Washington University, St. Louis, 1957–59: Glaucoma test evaluation for collaborative study.

Louisiana State University School of Medicine, 1962 to present: Conduct a study of natural history of ocular changes.

Brookline Health Department, Brookline, Mass., 1962 to present: Vision testing and correction for nursing home residents. Agreements

Freedmen's Hospital, Washington, D.C., 1962–64; Glaucoma case-finding study on the association between glaucoma and other systemic diseases.

Freedmen's Hospital, Washington, D.C., 1962–64: Study of relationship between glaucoma and diabetes. Staff study

Philadelphia, Pa., 1957: Glaucoma case-finding followup study.

Mr. ROBERTS. This will conclude the hearings on H.R. 8546, and we thank the witnesses who have appeared.

I would like to have the committee's attention in executive session for just a few minutes. (The following material was submitted for inclusion in the record :)

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, D.C., May 26, 1964. Hon. KENNETH A. ROBERTS, Chairman, House Subcommittee on Public Health and Safety, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN : My bill H.R. 8705 is companion to H.R. 8546 and other such legislation designed to amend title VII of the Public Health Service Act so as to extend to qualified schools of optometry and students of optometry those provisions thereof relating to student loan programs.

With an interest in conserving the time of your subcommittee in its deliberations, I would appreciate your submitting to the record of hearings this letter as evidence of my support of this legislation, this in lieu of my appearance before your subcommittee.

The highly technical age in which we live requires good vision, both for our safety and for maximum benefits from the products of technology that are all about us. It is indeed unfortunate that optometry was not included in the Health Professions Education Assistance Act of 1963, the authority (Public Law 88–129) which provided student loans to individuals studying medicine, dentistry, and osteopathy. The legislation which is the subject of this subcommittee's deliberations will move forward to correct this omission.

There is a very definite need for this type of legislation, for it is estimated that today there are only about 16,000 optometrists in the United States. This number falls far short of satisfying our needs, for, as reported by Dr. W. Judd Chapman, president of the American Optometric Association, there is this need for vision services in the general population :

An estimated 100 million people in the United States, as many as 58 percent of the population, require some form of vision care; that is, correction by glasses, visual training, or other types of treatment.

About 9,800,000 children need vision care, and it is estimated that a large number of these children should be wearing glasses.

About 350,000 persons are legally blind. Some 75 percent of this number can be rehabilitated to function as normally sighted persons.

Some 1,500,000 persons are blind in one eye. Approval of the legislation that is before this subcommittee would work to broaden the base of these optometric services, doing this by providing inducements for students to enter into this highly specialized field. Because of this, I respectfully urge that this subcommittee approve the object of H.R. 8705 and other similar legislation.

Mr. Chairman, I deeply appreciate having the opportunity to present this letter of support to the record of hearings on this legislation relating to qualified schools of optometry and students of optometry. Respectfully yours,

CLIFFORD G. MOINTIRE.

Member of Congress. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, D.C, May 26, 1964. Hon. KENNETH A. ROBERTS, Chairman, Subcommittee on Public Health and Safety, Committee on Interstate

and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I take this means of expressing my support for H.R. 8546, your bill to amend the Public Health Service Act so as to extend to qualified schools of optometry and students of optometry those provisions thereof relating to student loan programs.

I also submit for inclusion in the record of the hearings now being held on this
legislation a supporting telegram which I have recently received from E. E.
Bach, O.D., president of the Alaska Optometric Association.
Thanking you, I am,
Sincerely,

RALPH J. RIVERS,
Member of Congress.

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA, May 24, 1964. Hon. R. J. RIVERS, House Office Building, Washington, D.C.:

Due to national shortage of optometry graduates, all Alaska Optometric Association members request your support in approval of H.R. 8346. Financial requirements of optometry students are the same as for equivalent professions of dentistry and medicine due to academic training duration.

Please include this statement in record of hearing taking place May 26, before House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee's Subcommittee on Health and Public Safety, chaired by Congressman Kenneth Roberts, of Alabama.

E. E. BACH, O.D., President, Alaska Optometric Association.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, D.C., May 26, 1964. Hon. KENNETH A. ROBERTS, Chairman, Subcommittee on Public Health and Safety, House Interstate and

Foreign Commerce Committee, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I have today received correspondence from a constituent, Dr. Richard E. Revilla, president of the Vermont Optometric Association, Inc.

Dr. Revilla has asked that his support of H.R. 8546 be made a part of the official records of the hearings taking place before the Subcommittee on Public Health and Safety. In his letter he stated :

I feel that there is a definite need for more optometrists and that this may very well be the stimulant needed to induce more people to enter into optometry.” Sincerely yours,

ROBERT T. STAFFORD,

Member of Congress.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

COMMITTEE ON JUDICIARY,

Washington, D.C., May 25, 1964. Hon. KENNETH A. ROBERTS, Chairman, Subcommittee on Public Health and Safety, House Interstate and

Foreign Commerce Committee, Washington, D.C. DEAR KENNETH : Enclosed is a telegram which I have received from Dr. B. W. Madden, president, Kentucky Optometric Association, in support of Federal loans to optometry students as provided for in H.R. 8546.

I want to express my interest in this provision for optometry students and every, consideration shown the request of Dr. Madden will be appreciated by me. I will be grateful if his communication to me is made a part of the official record of hearings in connection with H.R. 8546. With best wishes, I am, Sincerely yours,

FRANK CHELF,

Member of Congress.

FRANKFORT, KY., May 22, 1964. Representative FRANK CHELF, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.:

Request your support of Federal loans to optometry students as provided in H.R. 8546.

Thirty-eight counties in Kentucky do not have adequate visual care and new optometrists are not replacing those that die or retire.

Please include this statement in the record of hearings that will take place May 26 before House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee's Subcommittee on Health and Public Safety, chaired by Congressman Kenneth Roberts, of Alabama. Thank you.

B. W. MADDEN, O.D., President, Kentucky Optometric Association.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington, D.C., May 21, 1964. Hon. KENNETH ROBERTS, Member of Congress, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR KENNETH: I understand that you are scheduling hearings for next Tuesday on H.R. 8546, which would amend the Health Professions Education Assistance Act of 1963 to include students in the field of optometry under the provisions

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