A Tale of Two Cities

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Houghton Mifflin, 1894 - 373 pages
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Contents

I
ix
II
1
IV
4
V
10
VI
15
VII
27
VIII
38
IX
49
XXVII
188
XXVIII
195
XXIX
203
XXX
207
XXXI
218
XXXII
224
XXXIII
231
XXXIV
243

X
56
XI
63
XII
76
XIII
83
XIV
89
XV
101
XVI
110
XVIII
116
XIX
127
XX
135
XXI
139
XXII
146
XXIII
151
XXIV
161
XXV
172
XXVI
183
XXXV
255
XXXVI
262
XXXVII
267
XXXVIII
273
XXXIX
279
XL
286
XLI
292
XLII
305
XLIII
317
XLIV
331
XLV
335
XLVI
344
XLVII
356
XLVIII
368
Copyright

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Page 372 - I am the Resurrection and the Life, saith the Lord : he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live : and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die.
Page 373 - It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.
Page 280 - In seasons of pestilence, some of us will have a secret attraction to the disease — a terrible passing inclination to die of it.
Page 277 - ... with their heads low down and their hands high up, swooped screaming off No fight could have been half so terrible as this dance. It was so emphatically a fallen sport — a something, once innocent, delivered over to all devilry — a healthy pastime changed into a means of angering the blood, bewildering the senses, and steeling the heart.
Page 10 - A WONDERFUL fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by. night, that every one of those darkly clustered houses encloses its own secret; that every room in every one of them encloses its own secret; that every beating heart in the hundreds of thousands of breasts there, is, in some of its imaginings, a secret to the heart nearest it ! Something of the awfulness, even of Death...
Page 5 - ... the lowest stable nondescript, it was the likeliest thing upon the cards. So the guard of the Dover mail thought to himself, that Friday night in November, one thousand seven hundred and seventyfive, lumbering up Shooter's Hill, as he stood on his own particular perch behind the mail, beating his feet, and keeping an eye and a hand on the arm-chest before him, where a loaded blunderbuss lay at the top of six or eight loaded horse-pistols, deposited on a substratum of cutlass.
Page 312 - It was not a reckless manner, the manner in which he said these words aloud under the fast-sailing clouds, nor was it more expressive of negligence than defiance. It was the settled manner of a tired man, who had wandered and struggled and got lost, but who at length struck into his road and saw its end.
Page 368 - Crush humanity out of shape once more, under similar hammers, and it will twist itself into the same tortured forms. Sow the same seed of rapacious license and oppression over again, and it will surely yield the same fruit according to its kind.
Page 19 - Aa his eyes rested on a short, slight, pretty figure, a quantity of golden hair, a pair of blue eyes that met his own with an inquiring look, and a forehead with a singular capacity (remembering how young and smooth it was) of lifting and knitting itself into an expression that was not quite one of perplexity, or wonder, or alarm...
Page 323 - You know, Doctor, that it is among the Rights of these Nobles to harness us common dogs to carts, and drive us. They so harnessed him and drove him. You know that it is among their Rights to keep us in their grounds all night, quieting the frogs, in order that their noble sleep may not be disturbed. They kept him out in the unwholesome mists at night, and ordered him back into his harness in the day. But he was not persuaded. No ! Taken out of harness one day at noon, to feed — if he could find...

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