Combating Terrorism: The Proliferation of Agencies' Efforts : Hearing Before the Subcommittee on National Security, International Affairs, and Criminal Justice of the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, April 23, 1998

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1998 - 78 pages
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Page 42 - Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, and the Naval Medical Research Institute. In addition, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Environmental Protection Agency all claim to have a critical role in the process.
Page 19 - FBI, the threat of terrorists' use of chemical and biological weapons is low, but some groups and individuals of concern are beginning to show interest in such weapons. Agency officials also have noted that terrorists' use of nuclear weapons is the least likely scenario, although the consequences could be disastrous.
Page 28 - Command testified in 1998 about the difficulties of using weapons of mass destruction, noting that "an effective, mass-casualty producing attack on our citizens would require either a fairly large, very technically competent, well-funded terrorist program or state sponsorship." Moreover, in 1996, the Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency testified that the agency had no conclusive information that any of the terrorist organizations it monitors were...
Page 33 - And again, you see a large number of wounded, over 900 in the bombing of the World Trade Center in New York City, in 1993, and again in Dharan.
Page 15 - Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction Act" also known as the Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Act.
Page 17 - States and note that conventional explosives and firearms continue to be the weapons of choice for terrorists. Terrorists are less likely to use chemical and biological weapons than conventional explosives, although the possibility that they may use chemical and biological materials may increase over the next decade, according to intelligence agencies.
Page 18 - ... analytically sound threat and risk assessment using valid inputs from the intelligence community and other agencies. Threat and risk assessments could help the government make decisions about how to target investments in combating terrorism and set priorities on the basis of risk; identify unnecessary program duplication, overlap, and gaps; and correctly size individual agencies...
Page 45 - For example, the Department of Energy does not need to have a NEST and a JTOT. These units should be merged and scaled down. I also think it is foolish to assign various parts of the mission for dealing with threats from weapons of mass destruction to different military units. One unit could perform the tasks currently assigned to Army's Technical Escort Unit and the Marine Corps' Chemical Biological Incident Response Force, for example.
Page 15 - Threat and risk assessments could help the government make decisions about how to target investments in combating terrorism and set priorities on the basis of risk; identify unnecessary program duplication, overlap, and gaps; and correctly size individual agencies
Page 24 - FBI terrorism-related funding and staff-level authorizations tripled, and Federal Aviation Administration spending to combat terrorism nearly tripled. We also reported that key interagency management functions were not clearly required or performed. For example, neither the National Security Council nor the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) was required to regularly collect, aggregate, and review funding and spending data relative to combating terrorism on a crosscutting, governmentwide basis....

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