International Medical Guide for Ships: Including the Ship's Medicine Chest

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World Health Organization, 1988 - 368 pages

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Page 336 - The Phalanges of the foot, both in number and general arrangement, resemble those in the hand ; there being two in the great toe, and three in each of the other toes. The phalanges of the first row resemble closely those of the hand.
Page 8 - ... second. For external cardiac compression to be effective, the patient must be on a firm surface. If he is in bed, a board or improvised support should be placed under his back, but compression must not be delayed for that purpose. The rescuer stations himself at the side of the patient and places only the heel of one hand over the lower half of the sternum. Care must be exercised not to place the hand over the tip or xiphoid process of the sternum which extends down over the upper abdomen. He...
Page 336 - ... When you take a deep breath, your ribs move slightly upwards and outwards so as to expand your chest. The sternum, flat and dagger-shaped, lies just under the skin of the front of the chest, and to its upper end is attached the clavicle (collar-bone). On either side this bone goes out horizontally to the point of the shoulder and acts like an outrigger in keeping the shoulder in position. The outer end of the collarbone joins with the scapula (shoulder-blade), which is a triangular bone lying...
Page 245 - The pain, if on the right side only, may be mistaken for appendicitis (page 169) but it does not begin over the centre of the abdomen before moving to the right. In addition, the temperature in salpingitis usually tends to be higher than that recorded in appendicitis. Pain on passing water will indicate that cystitis rather than Salpingitis is present. Treatment General treatment The patient should be put to bed, and her temperature, pulse, and respiration should be recorded every 4 hours. Specific...
Page 254 - While afloat in the water, do not attempt to swim unless it is to reach a nearby craft, a fellow survivor, or a floating object on which you can lean or climb. Unnecessary swimming will "pump" out any warm water between your body and the layers of clothing, thereby increasing the rate of body-heat loss.
Page 33 - Lower arm (radius and ulna) or forearm There are two large bones in the forearm, and either one or both of these may be broken. When only one bone is broken, the other acts as a splint and there may be little or no deformity. However, a marked deformity may be present in a fracture near the wrist. When both bones are broken, the arm usually appears deformed. Treatment. The fracture should be straightened carefully by applying traction on the hand (see Fig. 18, page 22). A half-arm, inflatable...
Page 186 - Type of drug and slang names* Physical symptoms Look for Dangers AMPHETAMINES AND METHAMPHETAMINE (bennies, pep pills, dexies, copilots, wakeups, lid poppers, hearts, uppers) BARBITURATES (barbs, blue devils, goof balls, candy, yellow jackets, phennies, peanuts, blue heavens downers, red birds) aggressive behaviour, giggling, silliness, rapid speech, confused thinking, no appetite, extreme fatigue, dry mouth, bad breath, shakiness, dilated pupils, sweating; subject licks lips, rubs and scratches...
Page ii - To ensure the widest possible availability of authoritative information and guidance on health matters, WHO secures broad international distribution of its publications and encourages their translation and adaptation. By helping to promote and protect health and prevent and control disease, WHO's books contribute to achieving the Organization's principal objective - the attainment by all people of the highest possible level of health.
Page 38 - ... used to produce a quick upward thrust to the upper abdomen. If the casualty is unconscious, place him on his back and turn the face to one side. Kneel astride him and place one hand over the other with the heel of the lower hand at the place where the ribs divide. Press suddenly and sharply into the abdomen with a hard quick upward thrust. Repeat several times...
Page 41 - The helper stretches himself, stands upright, and shifts the casualty so that his weight is well balanced across the helper's shoulders In a narrow space, the simple fore-and-aft carry may be best. One helper supports the patient under his arms, and the other under his knees. Other methods of manhandling are demonstrated in Fig. 47-55. One advantage of the three-handed seat (Fig. 50 and 51) is that one of the helpers has a free arm and hand that can be used either to support an injured limb or as...

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