Dialogues of Plato: Containing the Apology of Socrates, Crito, Phaedo, and Protagoras

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Colonial Press, 1899 - 208 pages
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Page 28 - He who has the power to take part in the deliberative or judicial administration of any state is said by us to be a citizen of that state ; and speaking generally, a state is a body of citizens sufficing for the purposes of life.
Page 204 - But is there any one thus intended by nature to be a slave, and for whom such a condition is expedient and right, or rather is not all slavery a violation of nature? There is no difficulty in answering this question, on grounds both of reason and of fact. For that some should rule and others be ruled is a thing not only necessary, but expedient; from the hour of their birth, some are marked out for subjection, others for rule.
Page 169 - Further, it is clear that children should be instructed in some useful things, — for example, in reading and writing, — not only for their usefulness, but also because many other sorts of knowledge are acquired through them. With a like view they may be taught drawing, not to prevent their making mistakes in their own purchases, or in order that they may not be imposed upon in the buying or selling of articles, but rather because it makes them judges of the beauty of the human form. To be always...
Page 166 - The citizen should be moulded to suit the form of government under which he lives." For each government has a peculiar character which originally formed and which continues to preserve it. The character of democracy creates democracy, and the character of oligarchy creates oligarchy; and always the better the character, the better the government.
Page 33 - I shall then be able to continue my search into true and false knowledge; as in this world, so also in the next; and I shall find out who is wise, and who pretends to be wise, and is not.
Page 75 - ... when there is no middle class, and the poor greatly exceed in number, troubles arise, and the state soon comes to an end.
Page 167 - The existing practice is perplexing; no one knows on what principle we should proceed — should the useful in life, or should virtue, or should the higher knowledge, be the aim of our training; all three --,, b opinions have been entertained.
Page 75 - But a city ought to be composed, as far as possible, of equals and similars ; and these are generally the middle classes. Wherefore the city which is composed of middle-class citizens is necessarily best / N.
Page 31 - ... my accusers are keen and quick, and the faster runner, who is unrighteousness, has overtaken them. And now I depart hence condemned by you to suffer the penalty of death...
Page 25 - This was a specimen of the sort of commands which they were always giving with the view of implicating as many as possible in their crimes; and then I showed, not in word only but in deed, that, if I may be allowed to use such an expression, I cared not a straw for death, and that my great and only care was lest I should do an unrighteous or unholy thing.

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