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TABLE No. IV.-Farm Values of Agricultural Products Used in the Production of Distilled Spirits and Fermented Liquors in the U.S.

During the Fiscal Year 1913.

Rice

Hops

Rye

Molasses

Fruit

Other
Agricul-

tural
Products

Total

Dollars

Dollars

598

781
271

Dollars

5,016

658
2,278

7,013
190,002 680,746

17,761

5,180
10,457
1,940
3,546

149,036
43,465
87,748
16,282
29,750

2,323

STATES AND
TERRITORIES

Barley

Corn

Wheat

Dollars

Alabama..
Alaska.
Arizona..
Arkansas
California.
Colorado.
Connecticut..
Delaware.
District of Columbia (1)
Florida.
Georgia..
Hawaii (1)
Idaho.
Illinois
Indiana..
Iowa..
Kentucky (3)
Louisiana.
Maine
Maryland..
Massachusetts (2)
Michigan (1)
Minnesota.
Missouri..
Montana
Nebraska.

Dollars Dollars

38,730 27,332
4,688 1,412
16,242 4,892

8581 5,507
1,062,757 357,304

309,930 93,356
631,772 195,553
116,099 34,971
212,136 63,899

4,366 15,468
112,697 33,946
20,171 6,076

21,655 6,523
6,038,527 6,637,266
1,855,686 3,732,808

385,223 116,036
1,545,213 4,553,701
431,451 129,955
286

86
1,110,982 298,977
2,026,535 618,823
1,598,201 481,407
1,299,852 391,538
3,330,120 1,052,014

213,944 64,444
389,584 365,293

Dollars Dollars

7,677 2,876
1,006
3,486

534
228,095
66,522
134,294 11,969
24,919
45,532

3,153
24,189
4,330

4,648
1,136,986 267,911
230,2381 127,209

82,683
140,337 1,121,278
92,601

29
62
194,648 898,337
434,108 11,235
343,030
278,994
712,251 12,543
45,920
75,560 14,275

Dollars Dollars
387

82,616
51 7,893
176 27,345

13,912
11,485 2,697,186

3,350 521,803
6,762 1,080,878
1,255 195,466
2,293 357,156

22,987
1,218 189,739
218 33,961

234 36,451
57,249 14,969,463
14,614 6,239,428
4,163

648,567
7,066 7,478,958
6,621 1,464,209
3

482
10,267 2,658,169
21,858 3,726,799
17,272 2,690,755
14,048 2,188,450
35,863 5,667,083

2,312 360,200 3,805 903,772

86
6,633

1,884

337

362
88,536
22,600

6,438
10,931
7,211

5
15,157
33,803
26,711
21,7251
55,6091
3,576
5,884

15,805
2,829

3,029
742,902
189,640
54,024
91,695
60,5051

40
127,182
283,644
224,134)
182,293)
465,382

30,004
49,371

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TABLE No. IV (Continued).-Farm Values of Agricultural Products Used in the Production of Distilled Spirits and Fermented Liquors

in the U. S. During the Fiscal Year 1913.

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Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars
Nevada..
12,271 3,696 205 1,721 2,634

133 20,660
New Hampshire.
229,985 69,276 3,844 32,254 49,363

2,485 387,207
New Jersey (3)
2,810,354 846,528 46,971 394,128 603,201

(3) 5,886 30,402 4,737,470 New Mexico

171

75 11,903 New York (3) 11,234,451 3,703,583 184,392 1,556,122 2,381,542 156,004

8,231 121,541 19,345,866 North Carolina. 628

649 79,214 201 1,037 81,729
Ohio.
4,302,520 2,444,394 70,474 574,761 879,652 245,539

15,240 44,292 8,576,872
Oregon.
177,368 53,426 2,965 24,874 38,070

1,917 298,620
Pennsylvania (3)
6,678,252 1,975,716 106,078 888,281 1,359,485 1,567,388

237 99,299 12,674,736
Rhode Island (3)
558,336 168,181 9,332 78,302 119,839

(3)

128. 6,034 940,152 South Dakota. 35,294 10,631 590 4,950 7,576

381 59,422
Tennessee (1)
221,926 66,848 3,710 31,123 47,634

2,398 373,639
Texas.
592,778 178,555 9,908 83,132
127,2311

6,406 998,010
Utah..
111,923 33,713 1,871 15,697

1,210 188,437
Virginia
196,838 211,153 2,774 23,270 35,614 28,300

9,352 1,793

509,094 Washington (3). 697,709 210,162 11,662 97,848 149,753

(3)

696 7,540 1,175,370 West Virginia. 306,087 88,933 4,935 41,406 63,370 44,099

12 3,191 552,033 Wisconsin... 4,178,885 1,484,322 68,777 577,104 883,238

90,408

45,241 7,327,975
Wyoming..
12,175 3,667 204 1,707

132 20,499
Other States and Terri-
tories..
94,188 80,8651 529 4,417 6,764

740

754,781 223 28,042 970,549
Total..
55,236,641) 30,924,3351 869,938 7,288,786 11,155,215) 4,604,476| 2,056,626 751,835

626,119 113,513,971 (1) Breweries only; see Table III. (2) See Table III, Fruit. (3) See Table III, Molasses. (4) Includes the equivalent in corn, at its farm value, of corn sugar, corn syrup, and other corn products used in brewing.

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PROHIBITION, PERNICIOUS SOCIAL WASTE

Presidential Address at the Annual Banquet of the American Society of Brewing

Technology, March 18, 1914, by Dr. R. Wahl.

No one will dispute the great uplifting influence of the technical and scientific achievements of man during the century past, which period may be called the dawn of the reign of intelligence when man had come to realize his dominant power over the forces of nature, which he was learning to control and utilize to his various advantages. Methods of transportation of man and merchandise; of intercommunication; of agriculture; of industrial pursuit; of engineering, mechanical, civil, mining, chemical and electrical; of treatment of diseases, have been revolutionized and perfected to a degree not even imaginable before.

Slowly and laboriously through the ages past the intelligence of man has evolved and has finally triumphed over all obstacles, over earth and water and air, over distance and time. But while we record an undreamed of advancement in these technical and scientific pursuits because of the application of principles born of the intellect. and based upon the unalterable laws of nature, we find in other fields of human endeavor the efforts of man towards progress seemingly futile.

Questions of the greatest moment to civilization and problems concerning the welfare, happiness and liberty of the people are treated in the most haphazard and arbitrary manner without regard for the teachings of history, of science or of common sense, but purely out of sentimental and emotional promptings; an attitude that reflects upon an enlightened people and which belongs to the past when society was at a lower level of evolution.

So it is with the problems connected with the traffic in alcoholic beverages which we find dealt with in a most unfair spirit.

And it is regrettably true that in this country public opinion is more readily influenced by sentimental considerations, and is, therefore, more readily misled by demagogical and fanatical agitations, to incline towards and encourage the puritanical viewpoint that the traffic in fermented beverages of any kind is responsible for all of man's physical degradation and moral turpitude and that nothing

more is necessary to reach the millennium on this earth than to prohibit the manufacture, importation and sale of alcoholic beverages by putting the brewery and saloon, wliich are held up as the offenders, out of business.

And in the light of the success of prohibition, north, south, east and west, public opinion seems to be succumbing, without much resistance, completely to this unscientific, illogical and perverse viewpoint. Township and county, state after state go dry, seemingly irrespective of any considerations of personal liberty or property rights guaranteed by our Constitution, and that this attitude of the public is becoming fixed and solid is shown by the fact that no arguments based on reason or a sense of justice have any longer any effect on these biased minds. These arguments are not even considered, but simply ignored.

You can make no impression on these minds, it seems, by pointing out the many benefits derived by the government, by states and municipalities through the liquor traffic on account of revenues received through taxation and licenses; by demonstrating the commercial importance of the trade; the many millions invested in manufactories, the number of acres planted to brewing cereals and hops, the number of men and families depending for support on the manu:facture and sale of alcoholic beverages; or by pointing out the intolerable encroachment on personal liberty or property rights; or proving the historic fact that alcoholic beverages stood at the very cradle of those races which have made the greatest progress technically and sociologically; beverages that have been the solace of man at his best through the ages on his upward course to an ever brighter and higher civilization. And compare this with the civilization reached by those peoples who, like the American Indians and Australian bushmen, did not learn how to produce them, or to the Mohammedans who have prohibited them, the Buddhists who are abstainers in this respect and the Chinese who are addicted to opium.

And all this knowledge of no avail !

Saloons must be destroyed, alcoholic beverages expunged, the manufacture and sale made impossible because they are a conveni. ent scapegoat to explain man's downfall, the prevalence of crime and the admitted failure of the church to influence the masses as of old !

And let us be just, even to the point of generosity, and admit that if these people were right, and the liquor traffic were an un. mitigated evil and its abolishment justifiable, none of the advantages

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1 GAL. KETTLE.

RUBBER

HOSE

KITCHEN RANGE.

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Illustration of home Distillery as described in address on "Prohibition, Pernicious Social Waste" by Dr. R. Wahl

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