Drug control : U.S. assistance to Colombia will take years to produce results : report to the chairman and ranking member, Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy, and Human Resources, Committee on Government Reform, House of Representatives

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Page 33 - October 21, 1998, the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act of 1999 (PL 105-277) provided an additional $732 million to support antidrug and drug interdiction activities.
Page 36 - The targets of this objective are consistent with the goals established by the Office of National Drug Control Policy, Executive Office of the President.
Page 6 - United States has supported Colombia's efforts to reduce drug-trafficking activities and to stem the flow of illegal drugs into the United States. The...
Page 6 - Defense (DOD), the Department of State, and the US Agency for International Development (USAID) have provided Colombia in terms of counternarcotics equipment, training, logistics, and related support for fiscal years 1996-2000.
Page 10 - Despite US and Colombian efforts to disrupt drug-trafficking activities, the US Embassy in Colombia has not reported any net reduction in the processing or export of refined cocaine to the United States. Moreover, according to DEA, while two major groups (the Medellin and Cali cartels) dominated drug-trafficking activities during the late 1980s and early 1990s, hundreds of smaller and more decentralized organizations are now involved in all aspects of the drug trade.
Page 3 - AO Accountability * Integrity * Reliability United States General Accounting Office Washington, BC 20548...
Page 31 - To this end, the study is sponsored jointly by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict (OASD/SO/LIC) and the Office of the Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (DOS/R).
Page 11 - Call cartels) dominated drug-trafficking activities during the late 1980s and early 1990s, nundreds of smaller and more decentralized organizations are now involved in all aspects of the drug trade. According to DEA, several billion dollars flow into Colombia each year from the cocaine trade alone. This vast amount of drug money has made it possible for these organizations to gain unprecedented economic, political, and social power and influence.
Page 41 - US Drug Control Efforts \ Senator GRASSLEY. So I finish with this commentary on the letter. This suggests that we are in the process of considering a major support package without a clear idea of what it is that we are proposing to do.
Page 36 - Drug Control: US Assistance to Colombia Will Take Years to Produce Results, GAO01-26 (Washington, DC: Oct.

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