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Is published in two editions: 1. Popular Edition, handsome paper cover. Price 25 cents. 2. Library Edition, with 100 additional pages; elegantly bound in full scarlet

cloth. Price, $1.50. Copies of the former issues, 1878, 1879, and 1881, may be had, bound, at $1,50 each. The American Almanac for 1880 is out of print.

PRESS OF

WM. K. BOYLE,

BALTIMORE.

FIXED AND MOVABLE FESTIVALS.

Epiphany
Jan. 6 St. George's Day.

April 28 Septuagesima Sunday ...Feb. 5 Rogation Sunday..

May 14 St. Valentine's Day.

.Feb. 14 Holy Thursday (Ascension Day)......May 18 Sexagesima Sunday.

Feb. 12 Decoration Day (Soldier's Graves)... May 30 Washington's Birth-day. ..Feb. 22 Whit Sunday (Pentecost)

..May 28 Quinquagesima (Shrove) Sunday ..... Feb. 19 Trinity Sunday.

June 4 Shrove Tuesday. .Feb. 21 Corpus Christi

...June 8 Ash Wednesday.. .Feb. 22 Independence Day.

...July 4 First Sunday in Lent_(Quadra

Michaelmas........

...Sept. 29 gesima Sunday). Feb. 26 Halloween

Oct, 31 St. Patrick's Day

.March 17 All Saints' Day--(Hallowmas). Nov. 1 Mid-Lent Sunday March 19 Thanksgiving Day.

Nov, 30 Palm Sunday. ..April 2 First Sunday in Advent.

.Dec. 3 Maundy Thursday.

..April 6
St. Andrew's Day

.Nov. 30 Good Friday

..April 7
St. Nicholas's Day.

Dec, 6 Easter Suoday.

..April 9
Christmas Day..

... Dec. 25 Low Sunday

..April 16

CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES, ETC.

Dominical Letter...
...A Julian Period

.6595 Solar Cycle... ...15 Jewish Era....

.....5612-43 Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number.. ........2 Mohammedan Era.

1299-1300 Epact.. ....11 Byzantine Era...

....7390-91 Roman Indiction................

..10 Independence of the United States...106-107
The Solar Cycle embraces a period of 28 years.
The Roman Indiction is a cycle of 15 years.
The Lunar Cycle is 235 synodical revolutions of tho moon -

19 yoars.
The Epact denotes the age of the moon on the Orst day of January.

ECLIPSES FOR THE YEAR 1882. In 1882, there will be two Ecllpses, both of the Sun, and a transit of tho planet Venus over the disk of the Sun.

1. A total Eclipse of the Sun, May 17. Visible in Europe, Asia, and in Northern and Central Africa.

2. An annular Eclipse of the Sun, November 10, invisible in North and South America. Visible in Australia, Polynesia, and the Southern regions of the Pacific ocean.

A transit of Venus over the Sun's disc will occur on December 6. Visible in a greater or lesser degree to a large part of the world, except to Eastern Europe and to Asia; and wholly visible to the Eastern portion of North America and to South America. Invisible to most of the United States lying west of. 110o W. longitude from Greenwich. There will be four contacts of the circular disk of the Sun and the planet.

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PERPETUAL CALENDAR. For Anding the day of the week on which any day of any month falls,

(or the day of the month of any given day of the week) in any year before or after Christ, Old Style or New.

Compiled by Joseph P. Bradley.- Copyright.

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EXPLANATION OF THE 1 2 3 4 4 5 6

CALENDAR. 7 8 8 9 10 11 12

1. The days of the

different months as 12 13 14 15 16 16 17

given above, fall, in 18 19 20 20 21 22 23

any year, on the weekYears of the Cen

day found opposite the 24 24 25 26 27 28 tury.

28 century (Old or Now 29 30 31 32 32 33 34

Style) in which the

year occurs, and over N. B.-LOAP 35 36 36 37 38 39 40 the year thereof. years being in40 41

2. Find the year in

42 43 44 44 45 serted twice, the

“ Years of the Cen46 47 48 48 49 50 51

tury; follow up the first number is 52 59 53 54 55 56 56

coluinn to the day on used whon the

the same horizontal 57 58 59 60

60

61 62 given date is in

line with the given cen. 63 64 January, or Feb

64 65 66 67 68

tury. Find

this day

under the given month. ruary; the second, 68 69 70 71 72 79 73 The figures above it in for the other 74 75 76 76 77 78 79

the same vertical line

show the dates of that months.

80 80 81 82 83 84 84 day during the given 85 86 87 88 88

month, and the week. 89 90

days in the same hori. 91 92 93 93 94 95 96 zontal line to the right 96 97 98 99

100 100

or left have their respective datos above them, thus forming the entire calendar for

that month and year. EXAMPLE 1.---To find the day of the week for July 4th, 1881. Opposite Century 19, New Style, and over year 81, 18 Saturday. Under July, Saturday falls in the verilcal line under 2, and the second day to the right following, under 4, is Monday, July 4th.

EXAMPLE 2.- To find the day of the week on which Columbus discovered America, October 12th, 1492, Old Style. Opposite Century 15, Old Style, and over 92 in black letter (it being leap year,) is Monday. Therefore, October 8th was Monday; and the line of woek-days in which Monday falls under October (which is the sixth,) with the days of the month above, constituto the entire Calendar for October, 1492, Old Style, and the 12th, as seen, falls on Friday.

EXAMPLE 3.--To find the 1st Tuesday after the 1st Monday in November, (Election Day,) 1882. Find 82 in “ Years of the Century;" follow up the column to the day on a line with the figure 19 of the “Centuries, New Style:" this will be found to be Sunday. Under November, Bunday is found in the vertical line under 5, of the calendar above, Monday to the right of it under 6, and Tuesday under 7. So the Tuesday after the first Muuday, is the 7th.

THE TIME OF HIGH WATER at the places following may be found approximately for each day, by adding to

or subtracting from the time of high water at New Yorke the hours and minutes annexed.

(Corrected at the office of the United States Coast and Goodetical Surrey.)

22

Albany, N. Y.
Annapolis, Md.
Atlantic City, N. J.
Baltimore, Md.
Bar Harbor, Me.
Beaufort, s. c
Block Island, R.I.
Boston, Mass.
Bridgeport, Conn
Bristol, R. I..
Cape May, N. J.
Charleston, s. C.
Eastport, Me.
Fernandina, Fla.
Gloucester, Mass.
Isles of Shoals
Jacksonville, Fla..
Key West, Fla.
League Island, Pa.
Marblehead, Mass.
Nahant, Mass..
Nantucket, Mass..
New Bedford, Mass.
Newburyport, Mass.
New Haven, Conn.

[blocks in formation]

II. M. New London, Conn. .add 1 16 Newport, R. I.

sub. Norfolk, 'Va...

.add 56 Norwich, Conn.

.add 2 5 Old Point Comfort, Va...add 37 Philadelphia, Pa.. .add 5 37 Plymouth, Mass.

add 3 12 Point Lookout, Md. .add 4 49 Portland, Me

.add 3 10 Portsmouth, N. H. .add 3 16 Poughkeepsie, N. Y add 4 27 Providence, R. I.

.add Richmond, Va..

add

8 47 Rockaway Inlet, N. Y. sub, 28 Rockland, Me..

.add 2 55 Rockport, Mass.

add 2 30 Salem, Mass

add

3 05 Sandy Hook, N. J.

sub.

36 Savannah, Ga.

.sub. 19 Smithville, N. C.

sub.

51 Vineyard Haven, Mass...add 3 35 Washington, D. C. .add 11 51 Watch Hill, R. I.

.add West Point, N. Y.

add 2 55 Wilmington, N. C. .add 39

..add

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EXAMPLE.-To ascertain at what hour it will be high tide at Baltimore on the 1st of August, find the time of high water at New York under August 1st, which is 4.24 A.M., then add 10 hours 52 minutes, as found in the table of Tide Constants under Baltimore, and we have 3.16 P.M. as the hour of high water at Baltimore August 1st, 1880.

NOTE.-The hours of high water in the calendar pages are the morning hours - from midnight to noon-throughout the year, as computed for the U. S. Coast Survey. To find the time of next high water, or the afternoon tide-from noon to midnight-add 12 h. 25 m. in each day. The result will be the proximate hour of evening tide. For low water, add 6 h. 12 m., approximately, to the time of high water.

Explanation of the Calendar. The two natural divisions of time are the day, of 21 hours, representing one revolution of the earth on its axis, and the year, 365 days, approximately representing one revolution of the earth around the sun. The month represents (nearly) the period of the moon's revolution round the earth (about 2912 days), while the week is approximately one-fourth of this.

By the Julian Calendar, established by Julius Cæsar. 46 B.C., the months were reconstructed; the Roman year, which began March 1, and had but ten months, being changed to Jan. 1, and two months added. Thirty-one days were given to the 1st, 30, 5th, 7th, 8th, 10th, and 12th months, and 80 days each to the rest, except February, which on every fourth year received an intercalary dar. made by the sexto Calendas Martius, whence leap year” came to be called Rissextile. As the Julian year had 36544 days, its length exceeded the true solar year by 11m.14 sec., so that the equinox in the course of centuries fell back several days. "To correct this error, Pope Gregory XIII. in 1582 reformed the

calendar by suppressing ten days, restoring the equinox to March 21. The Gregorian Calendar also made every year which is divisible by four without a remainder a leap year, except the centesimal years, which are only leap years when the first two figures are divisible by four: thus 1600 was a leap year, 1700, 1800, and 1900 common years, 2000 a leap year, etc. The length of the mean year is 365 d. 5h. 49m. 12 sec., exceeding the true solar year nearly 20 sec., which error amounts only to 1 day in 3,325 years.

The Gregorian Calendar was adopted by Germany in 1700, and by English law in 1752, when the Julian Calendar, or old style, gave place to the new style, by dropping eleven days from the month of September, 1752.

The festival of Easter, commemorating the resurrection of Christ, used to be observed on the 14th day of the moon, i.e., near the full moon-the saine as the Jewish Passover. But the Council of Nice, A.D. 325, ordered Easter to be celebrated on the Sunday next succeeding the ful moon that comes on or next after the vernal equinox-March 21st; thus makin, Easter and the related feast and fast days movable holidays.

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