Page images
PDF
EPUB

DEPARTMENTS OF STATE, JUSTICE, AND COMMERCE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1977

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1976.

SECRETARY OF STATE

WITNESS

DR. HENRY A. KISSINGER, SECRETARY OF STATE

Mr. SLACK. The committee will please come to order.

We are honored to have with us this morning the distinguished Secretary of State, Hon. Henry A. Kissinger.

Mr. Secretary, you may proceed in the usual fashion, off the record, to describe the problems which confront you and the country today.

[Remarks off the record.]

Mr. SLACK. If there are no further questions, we will go back on the record.

Thank you, Mr. Secretary, for your highly informative and interesting session this morning on the state of the world.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1976.

SALARIES AND EXPENSES

WITNESSES

LAWRENCE S. EAGLEBURGER, DEPUTY UNDER SECRETARY FOR

MANAGEMENT
JOHN M. THOMAS, ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ADMINISTRATION
DANIEL L. WILLIAMSON, DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR

BUDGET AND FINANCE
DON C. ELLER, DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF BUDGET
ROGER B. FELDMAN, DEPUTY DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF BUDGET

Mr. SLACK. The first item to which we shall direct our attention is entitled “Salaries and Expenses,” on page 13 of the committee print and beginning on page 4 of the justification book. This page we shall insert in the record, together with page 5 through 175. [The justification pages referred to follow:]

(1)

[blocks in formation]

The 1977 Budget estimates include the proposed change
and deleted matter is enclosed in brackets.

in appropriation language explained below. New language is underscored

Salaries and expenses:

For necessary expenses of the Department of State, not otherwise provided for,
Including expenses authorized by the Foreign Service Act of 1946, as amended
(22 U.S.C. 801-1158), and allowances as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5921-5925; expenses
of binational arbitrations arising under International air transport agreements;
expenses necessary to meet the responsibilities and obligations of the United States
in Germany (including those arising under the supreme authority assumed by the
United States on June 5, 1945, and under contractual arrangements with the Federal
Republic of Germany); hire of passenger motor vehicles; services as authorized by
5 U.S.C. 3109; dues for 11brary membership in organizations which 188ue publications
to members only, or to members at a price lower than to others; expenses authorized
by section 2 of the Act of August 1, 1956 (22 U.S.c. 2669); as amended; refund of
fees erroneously charged and paid for passports; radio communications; payment in
advance for subscriptions to commercial information, telephone and similar services
abroad; care and transportation of prisoners and persons declared Insane; expenses,
as authorized by law (18 U.S.C. 3192), of bringing to the United States from foreign
countries persons charged with crime; expenses necessary to provide maximum physical
security in Government-owned and leased properties abroad; and procurement by
contract or otherwise, of services, supplies, and facilities, as follows: (1) trans-
lating, (2) analysis and tabulation of technical information, and (3) preparation of
special maps, globes, and geographic aids; administrative and other expenses authori-
zed by section 637(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961. as amended (22 U.S.C.
2397(b)), and by section 305 of the Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act of 1951.
as amended (22 U.S.c. 1613(d)); ($425, 400,000 $539,800,000: Provided, That passenger
motor vehicles in possession of the Foreign Service abroad may be replaced in
accordance with section 7 of the Act of August 1, 1956 (22 U.S.c. 2674), and the
cost, including the exchange allowance, of each such replacement shall not exceed 94,900]
$6,500 in the case of the chief of mission automobile at each diplomatic mission
(except that four such vehicles may be purchased at not to exceed $9,000 each) and
such amounts as may be otherwise provided by law for all other such vehicles,
except that right hand drive vehicles may be purchased without regard to anv maximum
price limitation otherwise established by law: Provided further, That in addition,
this appropriation shall be available for the purchase (not to exceed thirty-three),

[blocks in formation]

replacement rehabilitation, and modification of passenger motor vehicles or pri-
tective purposes without regard to any maximum price limitations otherwise established
by luw.

The change reflects an increase in the linitation on passenger motor vehiclos. The $4,900 limitation in the case of the Chief of Kission automobiles has been in effect since 1973. Recent price increases have affected tho Department's ability to purchase Type IV medium sedans suitably equipped to meet security and other highly essential needs for operations abroad. The acquisition of these vehicles within the current ceiling has become a problem within the past year in that one of the manufacturers has refused to offer vehicles. Other manufacturers are expected to follow this pattern of refusal by 1977.

Congress has recognized the increasing cost factor for motor vehicles through the enactment of legislation which: (1) permitted the purchase of additional systems and equipment above the statutory price limitation (P. L. 91-423); and (2) increased the general purchase price limitation for sedans from $2,100 to $2,700 (P. L. 91-91). Neither of these laws provide relief for the purchase of Chief of Mission sedans which include as part of the basic vehicle most of the additional systems and equipment that are addable options to a regular type sedan.

The proposed limitation of $6,500 should allow uninterrupted procurement through FY 1979, assuming annual
increases in the range of 7%. This is based on the upward movement (about 6%) of basic vehicle wholesale
prices from the 1975 to the 1976 model year.

« PreviousContinue »