The Politics of International Law

Front Cover
Christian Reus-Smit
Cambridge University Press, 2004 M04 29 - 324 pages
Politics and law appear deeply entwined in contemporary international relations. Yet existing perspectives struggle to understand the complex interplay between these aspects of international life. In this path-breaking volume, a group of leading international relations scholars and legal theorists advance a new constructivist perspective on the politics of international law. They reconceive politics as a field of human action that stands at the intersection of issues of identity, purpose, ethics, and strategy, and define law as an historically contingent institutional expression of such politics. They explain how liberal politics has conditioned modern international law and how law €~feeds back' to constitute international relations and world politics. This new perspective on the politics of international law is illustrated through detailed case-studies of the use of force, climate change, landmines, migrant rights, the International Criminal Court, the Kosovo bombing campaign, international financial institutions, and global governance.

From inside the book

Contents

Introduction
1
The politics of international law
14
When states use armed force
45
Soft law hard politics and the Climate Change Treaty
80
Emerging customary norms and antipersonnel landmines
106
International law politics and migrant rights
131
The International Criminal Court
151
The Kosovo bombing campaign
189
International financial institutions
217
Law politics and international governance
238
Society power and ethics
272
Bibliography
291
Index
316
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Christian Reus-Smit is a Senior Fellow and Head of the Department of International Relations in the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies at the Australian National University. He is author of American Power and World Order (2004), The Moral Purpose of the State (1999) and co-author of Theories of International Relations (2001).

Bibliographic information