Tourism and Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities

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Multilingual Matters, 2007 M08 17 - 226 pages

This book discusses the tourism-climate system and provides a sound basis for those interested in tourism management and climate change mitigation, adaptation and policy. In the first three chapters, the book provides a general overview of the relationships between tourism and climate change and illustrates the complexity in four case studies that are relevant to the wide audience of tourism stakeholders. In the following seven chapters detailed discussion of the tourism and climate systems, greenhouse gas accounting for tourism, mitigation, climate risk management and comprehensive tourism-climate policies are provided. This book compiles and critically analyses the latest knowledge in this field of research and seeks to make it accessible to tourism practitioners and other stakeholders involved in tourism or climate change.

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Contents

VII
6
IX
7
X
10
XI
16
XII
20
XIII
34
XIV
35
XV
36
XXXIX
150
XL
152
XLI
161
XLII
165
XLIII
171
XLIV
173
XLV
174
XLVI
176

XVII
45
XVIII
59
XIX
71
XX
81
XXI
83
XXIII
84
XXIV
86
XXV
88
XXVI
90
XXVII
97
XXVIII
114
XXIX
116
XXX
117
XXXII
125
XXXIII
126
XXXIV
140
XXXV
143
XXXVI
144
XXXVII
145
XLVII
203
XLVIII
217
XLIX
221
L
223
LI
224
LII
225
LIII
228
LIV
229
LV
260
LVI
261
LVII
262
LVIII
263
LIX
272
LX
278
LXI
283
LXII
301
LXIII
306
LXIV
328
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xiii - UNDP United Nations Development Programme UNEP United Nations Environment Programme UNFCCC United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change...
Page 9 - Tourism comprises the activities of persons travelling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes.
Page 271 - The Parties should take precautionary measures to anticipate, prevent or minimize the causes of climate change and mitigate its adverse effects, where there are threats of serious or irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty should not be used as a reason for postponing such measures...
Page 264 - Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Such a level should be achieved within a time-frame sufficient to allow ecosystems to adapt naturally to climate change, to ensure that food production is not threatened and to enable economic development to proceed in a sustainable manner.
Page 146 - Prefix Symbol 1018 exa E 1015 peta P 1012 tera T 109 giga G 106 mega M 103 kilo k 102 hecto h 10 deka da io-1 deci d io-2 centi c 1C'3 mill!
Page 127 - ... sources (A1B) (where balanced is defined as not relying too heavily on one particular energy source, on the assumption that similar improvement rates apply to all energy supply and end use technologies).
Page 99 - Society (TIES) defines ecotourism as "responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the wellbeing of local people.
Page 109 - Make optimal use of environmental resources that constitute a key element in tourism development, maintaining essential ecological processes and helping to conserve natural heritage and biodiversity. (2) Respect the socio-cultural authenticity of host communities, conserve their built and living cultural heritage and traditional values, and contribute to inter-cultural understanding and tolerance. (3) Ensure viable, long-term economic operations, providing socioeconomic benefits to all stakeholders...
Page 113 - Hydro and the other firms involved in the project, define sustainable mobility as the ability to meet society's need to move freely, gain access, communicate, trade and establish relationships without sacrificing other essential human or ecological values, today or in the future (emphasis added).
Page 9 - TOURISM EXPENDITURE: the total consumption expenditure made by a visitor or on behalf of a visitor for and during his or her trip and stay at a destination.

About the author (2007)

Dr. Susanne Becken is a Principal Research Officer at Lincoln University in the field of Sustainable Tourism. Until recently she was a Research Leader with Landcare Research, New Zealand, where most of this book has been written. Susanne led a government-funded project on travel behaviour and greenhouse gas emissions from international tourists. She has also completed a range of consultancy work in the areas of energy efficiency, climate change, and relating policies. At present Susanne is the lead consultant in a UNWTO project on climate change and tourism in Fiji. She is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Sustainable Tourism and acts as a contributing author to the 4th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; she also represents Oceania/Southeast Asia on the WMO expert team on climate and tourism. Prof. John Hay has nearly forty years work experience in academia, the private sector and governmental organisations, with a focus on bringing an interdisciplinary approach to the environmental sciences, to technical and policy-relevant assessments and to professional training in environmental science, engineering, technology, law, policy and management. John has extensive international experience as a climate scientist, including acting as lead author in the latest three assessments conducted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Currently John works as a consultant and advisor to many national governments and regional and international organizations, including the United Nations Development Programme, the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank and the United Nations Environment Programme. John is also the lead consultant in a UNWTO project on climate change and tourism in the Maldives.

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