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.. Federation of Labor calls upon Congress to pros needed means for a strong and more effective pro-- j pe to the physically handicapped, and asks for an Allt of an agency for the handicapped within and as wartment of Labor. - Badequacies of the present State rehabilitation proa povercome. The Federal share of assistance to the

marums must be greatly increased. Deeply ensalire against employing the handicapped must be

problem and review the whole range of remedies needed to improve placement and training, as well as medical and other rehabilitation services to the handicapped. Our approach to the problem, therefore, is the result of close and careful study over a period of years in which the federation has heavily drawn upon the knowledge and experience of its affiliates and its State and local organizations.

Of special concern to us is the manner in which Federal responsibilities can be exercised in order to relate more closely the various Federal activities and to assure their effective performance!

There is today a crying need for the unified handling of aid to the handicapped workers which would make possible vigorous leadership and adequate servicing of the workers' needs. I'nder the present system there is no such coordinated program. More than 33 units of the Federal Government are charged with some measure of responsbility for the various phases of the Federal program for the handicapped.

We ask that a single central agency for the handicapped be e-tablished in the Department of Labor in which the major activities and programs of the Federal Government dealing with aid for the handicapped, their vocational rehabilitation and other related problems would be consolidated.

We believe it would be unwise to set up such a bureau on an inde. pendent basis and, therefore, feel that placing it in the Department of Labor for household purposes only would not fully accomplish the objective we seek.

The function of rehabilitation of the handicapped for the purpose of reful and productive employment falls squarely within the scope of the Department of Labor, not only as a matter of economy but also of efficient administration,

The agency for the handicapped should be established as a separate unit, but fully integrated with the rest of the Department of Labor.

A proper cooperative relationship with other agencies of the Federal Government concerned would assure effective functioning of such a unit within the Department of Labor.

Equally great is the need to provide a measure of financial assistance to States unable to carry forward vocational rehabilitation programs at the present time.

We support the establishment of a revolving loan fund for the purpowe of extending loans to States. Such loans would enable States to carry on without interruption rehabilitation programs which conform to the minimum standards entablished by the Federal agency.

In some 23 States today either no etective programs are being maintained or services for the handicapped have been dra-tically eurtailed because of the lack of currently available funds.

We believe that a loan program, carefully supervice and conforin ing to sound standards of administration, would go a long way toward strengthening the State rehabilitation programs.

In addition, we would favor loan aid to qualified groups or organizations to help maintain cooperative enterprise for the handicapped. This could become an important addition to the very limited facilities available today for useful projects providing opportunities for the vocational development of the handicapped.

а pin that great strides can be made in a short time in

vijespread support, not only on the part of labor and * *yt ako on the part of the whole community, toward tation of the handicapped and greatly widened emmunities for them by charging the Department of

osibility for this vital national risk. * 14 15A Ter. Mr. Mason, we thank you very much for

secon. I am sorry that there are not other members * present, but this day seems to be a particularly heavy = 't work. This is the third one I have been to today.

I want to thank you, Mr. Chairman and members of - or the opportunity of appearing before the committee ***te views of the American Federation of Labor on this

szbject. WATER. I would like to comment on the good work Emlaration of Labor is doing in my State of Arizona in +5rid. They have been pretty much the leaders out there i want to thank you for that.

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water. Thank you. "as will be Dr. Glidden L. Brooks, medical director of matral Palsy Associations. Dr. Brooks, it was nice of Miut. We look forward to your testimony. You can

**78, either from the prepared text or from notes. T. OF DR. GLIDDEN L. BROOKS, MEDICAL DIRECTOR,

NITED CEREBRAL PALSY ASSOCIATIONS

", * to Bould like to do some combination, if I may. I would

*** prepared text and read excerpts from it in the

5. ITFr. You may proceed as you desire and the pre

made a part of your statement. 2 statement is as follows:)

***MUSTED ON BEHALF OF UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY ASSOCIATIONS

GENERAL STATEMENT

18? members of the committee, I am Dr. Glidden L. Brooks, of "Y medical director of United Cerebral Palsy Associations,

* this opportunity to present testimony on behalf of the *** Passy Associations is a nonprofit membership corporation * We als nationwide organization devoted exclusively to a united

man palsy. Its humanitarian work is supported by voluntary

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The American Federation of Labor calls upon Congress to provide the urgently needed means for a strong and more effective program of assistance to the physically handicapped, and asks for an early establishment of an agency for the handicapped within and as a part of the Department of Labor.

The growing inadequacies of the present State rehabilitation programs must be overcome. The Federal share of assistance to the rehabilitation programs must be greatly increased. Deeply entrenched prejudice against employing the handicapped must be broken down.

Labor believes that great strides can be made in a short time in bringing about widespread support, not only on the part of labor and the employers but also on the part of the whole community, toward speedy reħabilitation of the handicapped and greatly widened employment opportunities for them by charging the Department of Labor with the responsibility for this vital national risk.

Senator GOLDWATER. Mr. Mason, we thank you very much for coming this afternoon. I am sorry that there are not other members of the committee present, but this day seems to be a particularly heavy day of committee work. This is the third one I have been to today. Mr. Mason. I want to thank you, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, for the opportunity of appearing before the committee and to express the views of the American Federation of Labor on this very important subject.

Senator GOLDWATER. I would like to comment on the good work the American Federation of Labor is doing in my State of Arizona in this particular field. They have been pretty much the leaders out there and have done a good job. Mr. Mason. I want to thank you for that. Senator GOLDWATER. Thank you. The next witness will be Dr. Glidden L. Brooks, medical director of the United Cerebral Palsy Associations. Dr. Brooks, it was nice of you to come today. We look forward to your testimony. You can testify as you desire, either from the prepared text or from notes. STATEMENT OF DR. GLIDDEN L. BROOKS, MEDICAL DIRECTOR,

UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY ASSOCIATIONS Dr. Brooks. I should like to do some combination, if I may. I would like to submit the prepared text and read excerpts from it in the interests of time.

Senator GOLDWATER. You may proceed as you desire and the prepared text will be made a part of your statement.

(The prepared statement is as follows:)

TESTIMONY PRESENTED ON BEHALF OF UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY ASSOCIATIONS

GENERAL STATEMENT

Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, I am Dr. Glidden L, Brooks, of New York City, N. Y., medical director of United Cerebral Palsy Associations, Inc. We appreciate this opportunity to present testimony on behalf of the

United Cerebral Palsy Associations is a nonprofit membership corporation founded in 1948, the only nationwide organization devoted exclusively to a united attack on cerebral palsy. Its humanitarian work is supported by voluntary

cerebral palsied.

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T* - a*-1791uf a Im DH! had frn is the uninforma-1 obrasver to ths (sin that the primai ramindstofal is f**/mirde Thie as an intribal e inorges to the of prebral jained indi. Biduals sho are intril«*24''y biri' or <";[*rost 1' is true, however, that *** Horse Pornz from petral [t!«y have also sustained the additional handicap of Marylinterinalahin .

One of the minit diff« ni!! part of the exprebien past problem is that of helping adiplex to some if i je?' "*** of indumps and wwers. Estimate tdirste that thrise are wpis in the I'm:tel States who are suffis. ing from prebral pals. With unrenring regularitr abt 10 000 habies are born with cerebral palsy annually. I esery 5 mi! it. The rasplad of wre bral palu$ gpuins is groning strady a attention directed to the problem

Areading to the most authoritative mid-14 avariabie there are approximatriy 2011) adults with prebral paliar in the l’nira siatas aut cherck leavte ne to believe that about 51),

00) cerebral palsiai aduits are engage in some sort of remunerative inrupation.

The propofi* bilir for the employment rrhabilitation of the cerebral palsied was ined by the Foderal Government but the Foderal Government found itxelf incapable of meeting the need In 1967 with the airpwsate ineome of the l'nited States at the highest level in history and the total income of the Nation at a correspondingly high level, we were able to proride opportunities for only ont fourth of 1 percent for the adult (esxbral palsion. These people needed work. wanted work, and many could be adjustered to the condition in their communition only be meanw of work.

The most proposons nation in the world at full industrial and pronospiro rapacity could protide employment for only 10 adult cerebral palsied throuh it* posernmental machinery This record of providing employment rehabilita. tion to victims of cerebral palsy should give ja pane and demands that rigorous, (tructive gation he taken to present it rerirreno

We are, therefore, asking the Congress through this committee to stop into the branch and do something constrnetise for these truly forgotten men and

siz disability of other handicapped persons interferes with their

and training, the situation for the cerebral palsied is intensiwalipie complexity of their involvement produces multiple de individual.

orvos in the act in effect exclude the cerebral palsied from wintes clearly intended for all the handicapped. * Employment is Nature's best physician—it is essential to

To a person who has never known success but has been al and looked upon by his family, his friends, and the com

uti, and perhaps, unjustly, as feebleminded, a job assumes ***abr than to the physically able. We know how destructive *! had be is rejected or pitied by his family and his peers, and Liipps and ambitions shattered when he discovers the sign "No

ned for him without benefit of a fair trial. 2. of national economy, it is far less costly to habilitate prepare him for even partial employment than it is to keep him

for a lifetime. Some cerebral palsied individuals have, "Xalapre, adeqnately demonstrated their ability to become

tributing members of society. We are convinced that many 5.3d tual preparation and opportunity, take their places in 29. not only the benefit of economic status, but also the attainestance and a personal satisfaction which comes from a sense

mottributing." For his happiness and self-respect, every * 374 nianificant work to do, fitted to his individual capacity. * sond statistics from the Department of Health, Education, ...e that 892 cerebral palsied were rehabilitated in 1949; 819 in

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Die in 1:32 rutional Rehabilitation of the Department of Health, Educae bas chariously cooperated by compiling for us two sets of

Fridly illustrate the plight of the cerebral palsied in his quest itures, copies of which have been submitted, show first the

dan palsied rehabilitated from 1945 to 1953, and second, the Asia with cerebral palsy who have been rehabilitated and placed

range from unskilled to highly technical and professional. rate that when the cerebral palsied has the opportunity for a cuidance through proper job placement, there is no doubt - in a tip'ribution to society, not only in service, but incidentally, *** "than a public ward. Las C. Whiton, president of the Prat-Daniel Corp. of South

54, as the first voluntary chairman of United Cerebral Palsy's 2* igram, has pioneered in this field, maintains that we are

Titlese bidden human resources of our society. He points * Aparica's cerebral palsied adults there exists an undeveloped

#industrial, business, and cultural life of the Nation. ****f received from Mr. D. H. Dabelstein, Assistant Director at Is trual Rehabilitation, dated December 16, 1953, a copy of mitted to your committee, “the State rehabilitation agencies

program enpbasis toward serving larger numbers of the He continues by saying: "As you know, rehabilitation of

is very costly and difficult." ** bif the California State Department of Education, Bureau Savitation, says: "Many physical or mental handicaps can

vocational rehabilitation services. Many others can be ty where they do not interfere with the work demands of a m.in. When the disability has been properly treated and the prirol for and placed in the right job, he can do that job as " I'm not what a man has lost, but what he has left that's

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ta physician, mi primarr medical background has been in pediatries, which doplne in the care of children. This is netrarily a forward looking liratek op 16-icine wine what we are in effect, doing, is helping to prepare children to her an offertise adults as their health and their Vation will nurmit Therefore I am

ople concerned by one of the final stages of this whole propes of south and de clopment of an indiridunl, hich is, of course, the ultimate Puloillment of his potential * #111srful adult This whole problem of porational rehabilitation very nearly the final phap of his preparation which we nhreirians begin in infnry and early childhood It is disturbing to me to see this field rarelines little nitontion that it may well become a lwttleneck which renders all that has Ronin bofore rather pointlese

Employment problems of morebral palsied stems from three major cousin: (1) Limitations impumar! on those people as a result of their phisical and op mental disabilities and emotional proteins: 19 inadequate functional guidance mu preparation for forsto plnrement: 131 raiutunes of employers to hiring the prepoborni pretend Power of their lack of knowlevige of the true nature of the condition, their preludire, or fear.

vitend mith a serions disability which is much more difficult and

it with rehabilitation techniques than is the case with many It is chtivus to us that a program inadequately financed will to depls enough into the reservoir of the handicaps to do much

5. but rather will be expended on the easier and more reTherefore, as we view it, the amount suggested by the

While the physical disability of other handicapped persons interferes with their prospects. guidance, and training, the situation for the cerebral palsied is intensified because the multiple complexity of their involvement produces multiple disabilities in the same individual.

The present limitations in the act in effect exclude the cerebral palsied from the benefits which Congress clearly intended for all the handicapped.

It has been said, "Employment is Nature's best physician—it is essential to human happiness." To a person who has never known success but has been categorical as atypical and looked upon by his family, his friends, and the eommunity as grossly unfit, and perhaps, unjustly, as feebleminded, a job assumes even greater importance than to the physically able. We know how destructive it is to a person to find he is rejected or pitied by his family and his peers, and finally to find his hopes and ambitions shattered when he discovers the sign “No Help Wanted" displayed for him without benefit of a fair trial.

From the standpoint of national economy, it is far less costly to habilitate an individual and prepare him for even partial employment than it is to keep him as a public charge for a lifetime. Some cerebral palsied individuals have, through their performance, adequately demonstrated their ability to become self-supporting, contributing members of society. We are convinced that many more could, with additional preparation and opportunity, take their places in industry and enjoy, not only the benefit of economic status, but also the attainment of social acceptance and a personal satisfaction which comes from a sense of "helonging" —of "contributing.” For his happiness and self-respect, every individual must have significant work to do, fitted to his individual capacity.

The latest published statistics from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare indicate that 892 cerebral palsied were rehabilitated in 1919; 819 in 1970: 881 in 1951, and 809 in 1952.

The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare has graciously cooperated by compiling for us two sets of figures which will vividly illustrate the plight of the cerebral palsied in his quest for aid. These figures, copies of which have been submitted, show first the number of cerebral palsied rehabilitated from 1945 to 1953, and second, the number of persons with cerebral palsy who have been rehabilitated and placed in jobs by States.

The jobs filled range from unskilled to highly technical and professional, These statistics indicate that when the cerebral palsied has the opportunity for training and proper guidance through proper job placement, there is no doubt that he can make his contribution to society, not only in service, but incidentally, as a taxpayer rather than a public ward.

Industrialist Louis C. Whiton, president of the Prat-Daniel Corp. of South Norwalk, Conn., who, as the first voluntary chairman of United Cerebral Palsy's vocational guidance program, has pioneered in this field, maintains that we are not properly utilizing these hidden human resources of our society. He points out that among America's cerebral palsied adults there exists an undereloped potential asset to the industrial, business, and cultural life of the Nation.

According to a letter received from Mr. D. H. Dabelstein, Assistant Director at the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, dated December 16, 1953, a copy of which has been submitted to your committee, “the State rehabilitation agencies have also been shifting program emphasis toward serving larger numbers of the severely disabled." He continues by saying: "As you know, rehabilitation of the sererely disabled is very costly and difficult.”

A pamphlet issued by the California State Department of Education, Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation, says: "Many physical or mental bandicaps can be removed through vocational rehabilitation services. Many others can be reduced to the point where they do not interfere with the work demands of a properly selected joh. When the disability has been properly treated and the person properly trained for and placed in the right job, he can do that job as well as anybody. It's not what a man has lost, but what he has left that's important."

We are concerned with a serious disability which is much more difficult and expensire to approach with rehabilitation techniques than is the case with many other handicaps. It is ohvious to us that a program inadequately financed will nerer reach down deeply enough into the reservoir of the handicaps to do much about cerebral palsy, but rather will be expended on the easier and more rewarding problems. Therefore, as we view it, the amount suggested by the President for vocational rehabilitation of $28 million is not enough. It certainly should be closer to $50 million and perhaps $75 million.

According to an article by Dr. Howard A. Rusk that appeared in the New York Times on Sunday, January 10, 1953, the Nation paid more than $430 million in 1952 for the disabled persons on public assistance rolls. In the same article Miss Mary E. Switzer, Director of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, noted that "if a proper program of rehabilitation is instituted, these workers will, during their working years, pay back in Federal income taxes $10 for every $1 the Federal Government invested in them.

I cannot overemphasize the importance of training of personnel for a wellrounded rehabilitation program. ('ertainly $1 million for training people to work with the cerebral palsied is necessary.

It is difficult to arrive at figures for the support of productive research, However, we suggest that $5 million should be invested in much needed research in the field of rehabilitation of the cerebral palsied. This was the amount that was determined as applicable in the case of research rehabilitation of persons afflicted with poliomyelitis. Cerebral palsy is as common a cause of disability and far more complex.

We know firsthand that the cerebral palsied can be rehabilitated provided they are placed under the supervision of trained personnel. One of our affiliates, United Cerebral Palsy of New York City, has, with its limited facilities and only one person in charge of the program, placed 56 cerebral palsied persons in paying jobs in about a year and a half. That interesting record is submitted for your consideration. It is called Vocational Placement of the Cerebral Palsied, a brief Experience in Dealing with the Vocational Problems of 200 Cerebral Palsied Adults, and was prepared by Linn W. Curtis, vocational supervisor for United Cerebral Palsy for New York City.

Some most interesting and informative pamphlets about vocational guidance for the cerebral palsied have been prepared by Dr. Frederick A. Whitehouse, former director of vocational rehabilitation for the Institute of Crippled and Disabled, and with your kind permission, I would like to submit them as part of this record.

In his health message to Congress in January of this year, President Eisen. hower said: "Working with only a small portion of the disabled among our people, Federal and State Governments and voluntary organizations and insti. tutions have proved the advantage to our Nation of restoring handicapped per. sons to full and productive lives.

“There are now 2 million disabled persons who could be rehabilitated and thus returned to productive work. Under the present rehabilitation programs only 60,000 of these disabled individuals are returned each year to full and productive lives.

“Rehabilitated persons as a group pay back in Federal income taxes many times the cost of their rehabilitation.

"Our goal in 19.5 is to restore 70.000 disabled persons to productive lives. Our goal for 19.36 should be 100,000 rehabilitated persons, or 40,000 persons more than those restored in 19953. In 1956, als), the States should bevin to contribute from their own funds to the cost of rehabilitating these additional persons. By 1979, with gradually increasing State participation to the point of equal sharing with the Federal Government, we should reach the goal of 200,000 rehabilitated persons each year."

Our reasons for appearing before your committee are twofold: (1) To ask that sufficient money be appropriated to provide for the rehabilitation of the cerebral palsied; (2) That some sort of provision be included in the law to make sure that each State be required to develop a rehabilitation program pot only for those who can be placed in employment within a short period but also for those whose rehabilitation will take a longer period and cost more moner.

I should like to conclude our presentation by pointing out that failure on the part of our Government to provide adequately for the rehabilitation of the cerebral palsied cannot be blamed on any public official. It can perhaps he traced to the fact that until recently public awareness of the magnitude of seriousness of the problem of cerebral palsy has not been sufficiently aroused. The growth of United Cerebral Palsy, whose sole concern is with the problems of this group of people, is evidence that the public is now beginning to face the deplorable facts which we have presented to you and further evidenced by the fact that we are here as a national organization, the first time that such a group has come before you to plead the cause of the cerebral palsied.

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