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committee hearing. Therefore, it prevented him from being here. But he would like the Secretary to be assured that he will review her testimony most carefully.

Senator PURTELL. I am very happy that you had that entered in the record. It was my intention to do that before we completed the hearings. Certainly we missed Senator Hill, who has a vast knowledge of this whole field and is most helpful to us. Senator Cooper? Senator COOPER. I have no questions. Senator PURTELL. Then may I thank you, Mrs. Secretary, and your associates, for helping us as you have this morning. We have no other witness to appear, so that this committee will stand in recess until Monday, April 5, 1954, at which time we will again take up this vocational rehabilitation program. Secretary Hobby. Thank you, sir.

(Whereupon, at 11:05 a. m. the committee adjourned until Monday, April 5, 1954, at 10 a. m.)

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46293_-34-pt. 2-4

PRESIDENT'S HEALTH RECOMMENDATIONS AND

RELATED MEASURES

MONDAY, APRIL 5, 1954

UNITED STATES SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

SUBCOMMITTEE ON HEALTH,

Washington, D.C. The subcommittee met at 10 a. m., pursuant to recess, in room P-63, Capitol, Senator William A. Purtels, chairman of the subcommittee, presiding.

Present: Senators Purtell (chairman of the subcommittee), Gold-
water, and Hill.
Also present: Roy E. James, staff director; Melvin W. Sneed and
William G. Reidy, professional staff members.

Senator PCRTELL. Our hearing is on the vocational rehabilitation Thommendations of the President, and our first witness is Mr. E. B. Whitten, executive director of the National Rehabilitation Association. You have a prepared statement, and do you wish that incorporated in the record and then make a summary, or is it your desire to read the complete statement? It is rather lengthy, but if you wish

to read it, you may.

STATEMENT OF E. B. WHITTEN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NATIONAL

REHABILITATION ASSOCIATION

Mr. WHITTEN. No, Mr. Chairman; I would prefer that the statement be filed for the record, and I shall speak from some notes and try to conform to the time limit that has been given. Senator PURTELL. It is so ordered. (The written statement of Mr. E. B. Whitten is as follows:)

STATEMENT OF E. B. WHITTEN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NATIONAL REHABILITATION

ASSOCIATION

The National Rehabilitation Association is a private, nonprofit corporation organized in 1925 to promote the rehabilitation of the handicapped and the professional advancement of rehabilitation workers. It has been in active existence continuously since that time and has grown from an organization of less than 100 individuals to its present membership of over 14,000. The National Rehabilitation Association was the chief sponsor of the Barden-La Follette amendments to the Vocational Rehabilitation Act, which was passed in 1943, and for several years has been urging State and Federal legislation to make the rehabilitation efforts of private and governmental agencies more effective. The 14,000 members of the association are almost equally divided between professionals in the field, that is, rehabilitation counselors, therapists, physicians, etc.

, and lay people who recognize the human and economic values of rehabilitation and seek to promote them through membership in the association. Its

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** THE STATE-FEDERAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM

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***! Grernment to rehabilitate handicapped civilians began "Pirational Rebabilitation Act in 1920. Before that time,

strated the possibilities of vocational rehabilitation. ispired by the Veterans' Administration Act which had ** Leices, at first, were limited to individuals injured in sontinued from 1920 to 1943 with meager appropriations,

ocpally to Focational training and counseling services. meldendments of 1943 broadened the scope of services and

y expand rapidiş during the war years and immediately att a handicapped person employable, a rehabilitation

vailable medical and psychological diagnosis, hospitaliIn supplies, placement equipinent, and counseling servup prwebditation process. Approximately 1,500 professional ***U0 persons annually, rehabilitating 65,000 each year.

en of locational Rehabilitation, which will undoubtedly is committee, will indicate how the State-Federal program her of persons rehabilitated and in the type and variety Set reports also show the source from which cases are Feces, the types of disabilities that are served and in trpes of jobs into which these people are rehabilitated.

Ek is that these figures indicate that the philosophy of *sp) serve all types of the handicapped, so far as their person*permit

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ST OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FOR REHABILITATION

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***ent has long been concerned with the problem of dis- up to date most of its expenditures have been in public slapped rather than in rehabilitation. For instance,

is participating in $140 million being paid annually to Info berx of 370,000 dependent children; it is participating RADC to 132,000 permanently and totally disabled adults;

is being paid to 98,000 needy blind. It is estimated i mbetantial being done to rehabilitate the persons who permanently and totally disabled” under this new category > *a total expenditures may reach $300 million or $400 tu treatest amount that the Federal Government has ever

Dlation of the bandicapped is $23 million which has in the 1933-34 fiscal year. Inasmuch as the values of *pusing the available manpower and production and in

are well known, it seems axiomatic that the Federal omncern for the rehabilitation of the handicapped people

appears that it has a responsibility to do more in the to reabilitation of the handicapped people than it has d'y other course would seem to be very shortsighted at this

PRX *. VT STATI'S OF ELHANI ITATION
At poppept,f, the efforts of the State. Fenderal rehabi!i*ation program are resulting
De politi".01 of 15 tumo su Tw19 annons This...It won't not liver prise

* beruff the aubwetup of partidel ard funt f:ith private soliter. In Bu011

, a zibe nullwr of india's are rehabilitoa hii privite sebabini ta', 1.41,1,* withest petting on the publie palabrata roca Jugel, stilistasin is imwambie to ascerain liut it is probably not over Son

It in mafe to qual me that from all sirits Dot much over 100mm je ste twing rohaliated at mails of the 2 wlio trole dinih lined 1 por nuk 1:) ato vitloor recited to the human tar heap comportels ople's goo go sformulik in menial capacitiem at far [p** than their pusenilai.

Ps plano, ilition efforts are not evenly distributered with respect to the series of diatri,;', sufioned by the handicapped.

For instance, at derable pogoose between made in the rehabilitation of the amputee the land, and the dispust the two istori il.stion of the mentally retarded the mentalv 111, the epurppa

thien no oporral prin vt, refe", fu almt in its infany. The number of persons in opened withesi tip pihal.i'11's each par. when conajelesed in the light of ir mien por 1 *** 21:]* mp much disabilit'-*. is significant proof of the

We livre de plant to our knoot me those ts no one partieul:ir turhan of di erbe lodivodule when its receisina completny adequate rehabilitations

loro pure $0,1*a, mich l muulovlige bine heen gnina! with repeat to the methods and trennes for rrhabilliating many of the handicapped who were our coti

The pioneering work of word insulins tomond not probe for rent i'atinn ir in "enyeru from the (riprled and limbled and the Institute of Physical Mouffrine and Rehabilita'lon, buth in New York (11), the Woodrow Wilson Blu torinoltton (enter of Fisherville, l'a., and others have been notable in this

PRORAM OF RED ABILITATION MUST BE MAINTAINED

lithoto !!!.. fr* in wth institutions is expensive. It is not nou that that still thunn! dollars bywnt on one case With funds of public and popis otrs go bobingen! on "*** in* atirenis limited, fans individus are not twink Arno por looptogu u trond profit from the many wertips that are nindale. Thin mittain, in turn, make commun tip very rantinus about putabit-hing set fiilillou, althoth the so kinow handicapped people doding se berriet

Dilihat one pot the gatos aprarently have realistfrally considered hurt robokie lotion for all of the timely handicappwd can be finanend. 10 * Simmo nii hutanotus of our inrent and mom effe tire rehabilitation centers could the bus bet nemt bliwwel or at least could not bare roarbeit their prpunt state mobilier duyment without the pavenue from the l'nike Mine Workers Welfare and Herman find, ut tand the moliej to rebuilt trippled miners and has innt hr. tata to use it.

the rehabilitation of the handicapped, in our judgment,

z factors: **-*. porgram of rehabilitation must be maintained and *K* Hieryone intimately acquainted with the work of the • Ens hat they are doing a good job with what they have ** 'beir are staffed and financed to do anywhere near ** I. Since it is unrealistic to assume that the private

going to be able to bandle the burdens of rehabilitaal core it appears that the demand for rehabilitation . Du pase rather than decrease, it appears inevitable that **of rehabilitation must remain the heart of the sobitate the handicapped. The State Federal program

Liu pters crossroads in the country. In many areas, in the rehabilitation counselor of the State-Federal pro

HISTORY OF THE STATE-FEDERAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM

Efforts of the Federal Government to rehabilitate handicapped civilians began with the passage of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act in 1920. Before that time, a few States bad demonstrated the possibilities of vocational rehabilitation. The act of 1920 was inspired by the Veterans' Administration Act which had been passed in 1918. Services, at first, were limited to individuals injured in industry. The program continued from 1920 to 1943 with meager appropriations, liniting its services principally to vocational training and counseling services. The Barden-LaFollette amendments of 1943 broadened the scope of services and erabied the program to expand rapidly during the war years and immediately after. In order to make a handicapped person employable, a rehabilitation sency may now make available medical and psychological diagnosis, hospitalitation and surgery, training supplies, placement equipment, and counseling servtoes throughout the rehabilitation process. Approximately 1,500 professional workers now serve 200,000 persons annually, rehabilitating 65,000 each year. Reports from the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, which will undoubtedly be made available to this committee, will indicate how the State-Federal program has grown in the number of persons rehabilitated and in the type and variety of services offered. Such reports also show the source from which cases are referred to the State agencies, the types of disabilities that are served and in wbat numbers, and the types of jobs into which these people are rehabilitated. Vost significant, we think, is that these figures indicate that the philosophy of the State agencies is to serve all types of the handicapped, so far as their personnel and facilities will permit, and that each year shows a higher percentage than the rear before of the number of cases which could be considered most severely bandicapped.

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FOR REHABILITATION The Federal Government has long been concerned with the problem of disability in the country, but up to date most of its expenditures have been in public assistance for the handicapped rather than in rehabilitation. For instance, the Federal Government is participating in $140 million being paid annually to 180,000 disabled breadwinners of 370,000 dependent children; it is participating ld the payment of $92 million to 159,000 permanently and totally disabled adults; It is contributing $63 million being paid to 98,000 needy blind. It is estimated that without something substantial being done to rehabilitate the persons who might be classified as “permanently and totally disabled” under this new category of public assistance that total expenditures may reach $300 million or $400 illion annually. The greatest amount that the Federal Government has ever appropriated for rehabilitation of the handicapped is $23 million which has ben made available for the 1953-54 fiscal year. Inasmuch as the values of reliabilitation in increasing the available manpower and production and in reducing dependency are well known, it seems axiomatic that the Federal Government does have a concern for the rehabilitation of the handicapped people of this Nation. It also appears that it has a responsibility to do more in the future to assist in the rehabilitation of the handicapped people than it has done in the past. Any other course would seem to be very shortsighted at this time.

STATE-FEDERAL PROGRAM OF REHABILITATION MUST BE MAINTAINED

Continued progress in the rehabilitation of the handicapped, in our judgment, depends upon the following factors : 1. The State Federal program of rehabilitation must be maintained and Frengthened. Almost everyone intimately acquainted with the work of the State agencies recognizes that they are doing a good job with what they have to work with, but few of them are staffed and financed to do anywhere near what is expected of them. Since it is unrealistic to assume that the private rehabilitation agencies are going to be able to handle the burdens of rehabilitation by themselvs, and since it appears that the demand for rehabilitation #rvices is going to increase rather than decrease, it appears inevitable that the State-Federal program of rehabilitation must remain the heart of the Nation's effort to rehabilitate the handicapped. The State-Federal program carries rehabilitation into every crossroads in the country. In many areas, in whole States, in fact, the rehabilitation counselor of the State-Federal pro

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