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1953 bed occupancy of 46 local general hospitals approved for 58 projects ' that were completed in North Carolina under the Hill-Burton program

Rutherford
Sampson
Sruthand
Stanly
S#311.
Con.
Wake

Do

Rutherfordton
Clinton
Laurinburg
Albermarle
Bryson City
Monroe
Raleigh

do

do. New

do. do

70
100
100
100

21
100

October 1951
September 1950.
January 1951
July 1950.
October 1950
December 1952.
November 1952.
December 1950

129 100 100 100

do

Rutherford Hospital
Sampson County Memorial Hospital
Scotland County Memorial Hospital.
Stanly County Hospital
Swain County Hospital,
Unjon Memorial Hospital.
Rex Hospital
St. Agnes Hospital.
Warren County General Hospital.
Washington County Hospital
Wayne County Memorial Hospital.
Wilkes General Hospital..
Lula Conrad Hoots Menorial Hospital.

52. 04 51. 60 85. 90 70.54 12. 10 74. 98 261.80 73. 50

40. 34 51.60 85. 90 70. 54 60. 41 74. 98 96. 26 81. 67

100 272

(

Warren Washington

do
Addition
Replace-

ment.
New

do.
Addition
New
.do.

35 20

Warrenton
Plymouth
Goldsboro
North Wilkesboro
Yudkin ville

Wayne

July 1951.
May 1950.
May 1952
April 1952.
May 1952

100

35 20 150) 100 30

17. 90 10. 80 120. SO 43.00 20.90

51. 30 54. 36 71. 90 43. 18 69. 93

Wilkes Yadkin

100 30

up to Dec. 31, 1952-Continued

County

City address

Name of facility

Average

Occu-
pancy,
1953, per-

Type of con

Date hospital

opened or addition struction

was completed

Normal Average
Beds bed com-

patient
added plement, census,
by 1953 3

1953 1
projects (exclude (exclude

bassinets) newborn)

cent 3

4

1 58 projects inriude 42 projects providing new patients' beds; 13 nurses' residences; and 3 powerplants. ? For entire hospital.

Nurses' ho:ne.

Powerplant

Number of beds activated during 1953,
• Service facilities, including a new kitchen, delivery suite, and the replacement of
patients' beds that were located in basement of hospital.

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NOR
ORTTY CAROLIN MEDICAL CARs Commiss/

SION
PO Box 1880 RALLION, NC.

EXHIBIT C 158 CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS FOR 87 HOSPITAL AREAS IN 83 COUNTIES AIDED BY N. C. MEDICAL CARE COMMISSION

July 1, 1947 — JUNE 30, 1953

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County, State, and Federal percentages of contribution in a cooperative hospital

construction programMethod VI

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PercentPercent. Percent- age con. age con- age con- tribu

tribu- tribu- tion of tion of tion of Federal county State Govern

ment

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44 44 44 44

Alamance.
Alexander
Alleghany
Anson
Ashe.
A very
Beaufort
Bertie
Bladen
Brunswick
Buncombe
Burke
Cabarrus
Caldwell
Camden
Carteret
Caswell
Catawaba
Chatham
Cherokee
Chowan
Clay.
Cleveland
Columbus
Craven
Cumberland
Currituck
Dare
Davidson
Davie
Duplin
Durham
Edgec imbe
Forsyth
Franklin
Gaston
Gates
Graham
Granville
Greene
Guilford
Halllax
Harnett
Haywood
Henderson
Hertford
Hoke
Hyde.
Iredell.
Jackson

44

44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44

44 44 44

County percentage contribution ranges from 16.7 percent (minimum) to 56,0 percent (maximum) and is based on the per capita individual income tax paid per annum over the 6-year period, 1939–44.

Senator PURTELL. Our next witness is a graduate of Columbia University Medical School and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. He has been a rural physician and surgeon and director of the New York State Joint Hospital Survey and Planning Commission, administering the Hill-Burton program, since 1946. He is a member of the State department public health service evaluation team on interAmerican affairs.

We welcome and are most anxious to listen to Dr. John Bourke.
Dr. Bourke.

1

STATEMENT OF DR. JOHN J. BOURKE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NEW YORK STATE JOINT HOSPITAL SURVEY AND PLANNING COMMISSION

Dr. BOCRKE. Mr. Chairman, Senator Hill, members of the committee: I have submitted a statement.

Senator PURTELL. Is it your desire to present in brief form the statement, or do you wish to read the statement ?

Dr. Bourke. I will read the statement, with your permission.
Senator Hill. Why the word "Joint” _New York State Joint Hos-
pital Survey and Planning Commission?
What does that word "Joint" mean?
Dr. Bourke. That is because it represents the three departments
having major responsibilities for hospital care
Senator Hill. I understand.
Dr. Botrke. The Welfare Department, the Health Department,
and the Department of Mental Hygiene.

Senator Hill. Oh, I understand.
Dr. BOURKE. In other words, it carries out the aims-
Senator Hill. Those are the three separate departments under your
State government, and this commission represents the whole?

Dr. BOURKE. That is right.
Senator Hill. Fine, Doctor. I just wanted to get this clear in my
mind, and for the record.

Dr. BOURKE, Mr. Chairman, I should like to add a short statement to my prepared statement, if I may.

Senator PURTELL. We will be very happy to have it. Dr. BOURKE. My testimony is limited to the medical and technical aspects of Senate bill 2758 and the related Hill-Burton program, in which I believe I am competent, namely, the provisions of the bill designed to secure community medical services and facilities for the patient and for the practicing physician.

I do not believe that I am competent nor authorized to speak favorably or unfavorably with regard to the Federal-State fiscal relationships, those aspects of the bill, under discussion. There are other groups studying those items.

Public Law 725, the Hill-Burton bill, as amended in 1949, has, in my opinion, contributed greatly to the health and improved quality of medical-care services in New York State. The program, administered by the New York State Joint Hospital Survey and Planning Commission, has been universally well received and has enjoyed the full cooperation and support of the medical and nursing professions. For example, after an inspection trip in 1951 to a number of the smaller Hill-Burton projects in rural areas, the president of the State Medical Society noted in a published statement that: “The provision of these hospitals, by meeting the needs of the physicians in the community, should enable them to render broader and better services to the people in their communities."

In New York the program has mobilized the full participation and assistance of representatives of medicine, hospitals, agriculture, labor, industry, and other groups concerned witli hospital care. at both the local and State levels.

To date, 83 hospital projects are receiving Federal aid in New York under the Hill-Burton Act. Of these, 65 are in operation, 10 are under construction, and 8 are still in the design stage. Their total construction cost amounts to $93 million, of which $26 million is being met with Federal funds. Moreover, it is significant that 85 percent of the Federal funds have been assigned to projects under voluntary nonprofit and church auspices.

Exhibit 1 illustrates that.

Senator PURTELL. Without objection, that exhibit will be received and made a part of the record.

(The exhibit referred to is as follows:)

ExhibiT No. 1. NEW YORK STATE JOINT HOSPITAL SURVEY AND PLANNING

COMMISSION Construction status of projects approved to receive Federal aid, New York State,

Jan. 31, 1954

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1 At 65 different hospital facilities, 6 of which are sponsors for more than 1 project.

Senator Hill. In other words, those figures show you haven't just sought to use these funds to particularly help out your State; isn't that right?

I mean you haven't sought to just channel these funds into what you might call State or county institutions ?

Dr. BOURKE. That is right.
Senator Hill. Is that right?
Dr. BOURKE. There have been no funds allocated to State projects.
I will refer to that briefly.
Senator Hill. All right.

Dr. Bourke. I believe that the aims of the Congress in passing Public Law 725 have been realized, as evidenced by the number of small communities in the rural areas of our State which now, for the first time, have modern, well-equipped hospitals and more competent medical staffs augmented by younger physicians attracted by the new facilities.

These communities probably would not have achieved this goal without the encouragement and assistance of the Federal program and many would still be operating their hospitals in hazardous, converted, frame dwellings and without proper equipment for effecting proper diagnosis and treatment.

The requests from hospitals for Federal grants for the construction of new and expansion and improvement of existing hospitals have at all times exceeded the funds available to the State.

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