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REFUGEES Results of initial evaluation in the United States of Indochineso rotugees classified overseas as having Class A (active) and Class B (not active) tuberculosis (TB), fiscal year 1984

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REYE SYNDROME Cases of Reye syndrome, by month of hospitalization, United States, December 1976-November 1984

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The number of Reye syndrome cases (204) reported in 1984 was among the lowest of the annual totals reported through the National Reye Syndrome Surveillance System since continuous surveillance was initiated in December 1976. The reported incidence of Reye syndrome in previous years has reflected, at least in part, the intensity and/or type of influenza activity. In 1984, influenza activity was much greater than in the two previous years, with widespread school outbreaks of both influenza A(H3N2) and influenza B strains that have previously been associated with nationwide outbreaks of Reye syndrome. The decline in the reported incidence of Reye syndrome in 1984 reflects a decrease in the number of cases in children under 10 years of age; the number of cases in older persons increased slightly. The decreased incidence of Reye syndrome for children under 10 was apparent in cases with both a varicella and a respiratory antecedent illness.

SUICIDE-Age-adjusted suicide rates, by race and sex, United States, 1940-1982

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Suicide remains a serious public health problem in the United States. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, 28,242 persons took their own lives in 1982, representing one suicide every 20 minutes. In the period 1940-1982, white males had the highest suicide rates compared with rates for males of black and other races and with rates for females of all races. Age-adjusted suicide rates (suicides per 100,000 population) for 1982 were 19.4 for white males, 10.8 for black and other males, 5.8 for white females, and 2.6 for black and other females. In 1982, white males accounted for 70.7% of all suicide deaths; white females, 21.9%; black and other males, 5.9%; and black and other females, 1.6%.

SUICIDE-Rates, by age group and sex, United States, selected years

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From 1950 to 1980, age-specific suicide rates for males increased for the youngest age groups but decreased for the oldest age groups. For females the youngest and oldest age groups continued to have the lowest suicide rates, and the mid-life group had the highest. However, between 1950 and 1980, rates for younger women increased, and rates for older women decreased.

SUICIDE- Rates for all persons 15-24 years of age, by age group, United States, 1970-1982

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In the United States suicide has changed from a problem that primarily affects older persons to one that primarily takes young lives. In the period 1970-1982, suicide rates for all persons 15-24 years of age increased 37.5%, with most of the increase due to the rise in the suicide rate for white males. Even though older white males had the highest suicide rates, in absolute numbers most suicides occurred among young persons; for white males, 49.2% of all suicides occurred among persons less than 40 years old. Because of the increase in the suicide rate among youth, the Public Health Service has established a specific health objective focusing on the problem of youth suicide. The federal objective states that "by 1990 the rate of suicide among people 15 to 24 years of age should be below 11 per 100,000 (compared with 12.4 per 100,000 in 1978)."

This information is based on published and unpublished data compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics from death certificates using the cause of death category "suicide and self-inflicted injuries." These suicide statistics probably significantly underestimate the true incidence of suicide because many suicides are reported as accidents, natural causes, or deaths due to undetermined causes.

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