Making The International: Economic Interdependence and Political Order

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Simon Bromley, Maureen Mackintosh, William Brown, Marc Wuyts
Pluto Press, 2004 - 562 pages
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Making sense of today's international economic and political system is one of the most challenging tasks facing scholars, citizens and decision makers. Making the International is an innovative introductory text that enables the reader to develop a confident grasp of political and economic analysis. Focusing on core skills and concepts, the book analyses key ideas in an integrated and cumulative way -- an approach that will enable the reader to formulate their own critical standpoint about how the international system is made and in whose name it operates. Making the International is genuinely international in its coverage -- contributors from India, Mexico and Africa offer their perspectives alongside others from the USA and the European Union. The book is divided into five main sections: Trade and states compares the WTO's argument for the free market with the realities of developed and developing countries’ experience. Making state policy looks at how states manoeuvre within the constraints of the international trading system and at the resulting policies of industrialization, national development and liberalization. Inequality and power investigates the impact of policies of liberalized trade and investment, and the patterns of inequality within developing countries. Autonomy, sovereignty and macroeconomic policy examines the ability of states to pursue national policies of macroeconomic management in a highly internationalized political economy. International collective action uses prominent examples of the successes and failures of states to achieve collective action – especially related to global climate change – and how collective action could be developed in the future.

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Contents

Looking forward
8
The road to Doha
15
The rocky road ahead
26
Gaining from trade?
33
The gains from trade
46
Gainers and losers within countries
56
escaping the trade poverty trap
64
Conclusion
71
Further reading
378
Tanzanias aid relationship
379
Autonomy sovereignty and the loss of voice
383
The pattern of aid to Tanzania and the pressure for a liberal state
387
aid with relatively few strings
393
the challenge to Tanzanias autonomy
394
the loss of voice
400
regaining voice?
402

Decisionmaking processes and developing countries
85
The nature of politics
100
Questioning Waltzs realist model
117
Making state policy
131
Formulating Indias national interest
146
Questioning the Nehruvian legacy
151
Liberalization the BJP and the reshaping of Indian politics
160
Conclusion
170
The industrial roots of economic growth
176
Indian industrial policy
186
Reviewing the growth performance of the Indian economy between
193
Technological change and productivity as determinants
200
the Indian
209
6
216
4
238
Income inequality
247
Mexicos membership of NAFTA
253
Autonomy sovereignty and macroeconomic policy
290
A w
306
The years of recovery?
324
Tanzania in
331
Tanzanias macroeconomic strategy from structural change
348
foreign exchange and exchange rate policies
356
Does structure matter under structural adjustment?
368
Conclusion
376
Conclusion
410
Further reading
411
International collective action
413
The collective action problem
415
The Tragedy of the Commons
418
The Prisoners Dilemma
422
Assurance
431
Chicken
435
analysing collective action problems
439
What can be done to elicit cooperation?
442
Conclusion
453
Further reading
454
Global warming the USA and the failure of collective action
455
Achieving cooperation? The obstacles to overcoming a global
467
Reconsidering the analysis of collective action
485
Conclusion
491
Interdependence asymmetry and power
497
5
500
Theory and voice
503
References
523
Index
543
N
550
Acknowledgements
561
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About the author (2004)

Dr Simon Bromley is Senior Lecturer in International Political Economy at The Open University. Dr William Brown is Lecturer in Government and Politics at The Open University. Professor Maureen Mackintosh is Professor of Economics at The Open University. Professor Marc Wuyts is Professor in Quantitative Applied Economics at the Institute of Social Studies in The Hague.

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