Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Common thought and parlance tend to conceal or deny the fact that demand for all practical purposes is unlimited. The vulgar assumption is that there is a definable amount of medical care 'needed', and that if that 'need' was met, no more would be demanded.... "
National Health Insurance: Panel Discussions Before the Subcommittee on ... - Page 426
by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Ways and Means. Subcommittee on Health - 1975 - 463 pages
Full view - About this book

Administration and public witnesses

United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Finance - 1970
...medical care, he has no sense of responsibility and from this many real problems are created. He says : Common thought and parlance tend to conceal or deny...is a definable amount of medical care 'needed' and if that 'need' was met, no more would be demanded. This absurd. Every advance in medical science creates...
Full view - About this book

National Health Insurance Proposals: Hearings, Ninety-second Congress, First ...

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Ways and Means - 1972 - 3293 pages
...the major irritant ingredients in Medicine and Politics." p. 26 "Common thought and parlance trend to conceal or deny the fact that demand for all practical...was met, no more would be demanded. This is absurd. Kvery advance in medical science creates new needs that did not exist until the means of meeting them...
Full view - About this book

National Health Insurance Proposals: Hearings...92-1, on the Subject of ...

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Ways and Means - 1972
...the major irritant ingredients in Medicine and Politics." p. 20 "Common thought and parlance trend to conceal or deny the fact that demand for all practical...unlimited. The vulgar assumption is that there is a definahle amount of medical care 'needed', and that if that 'need' was met, no more would be demanded....
Full view - About this book

National Health Insurance: Panel Discussions Before the Subcommittee on ...

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Ways and Means. Subcommittee on Health - 1975 - 463 pages
...certainly unproclaimed as such, are among the major irritant ingredients in Medicine and Politics." p. 26 "Common thought and parlance tend to conceal or deny...was met, no more would be demanded. This is absurd. Every advance in medical .science creates new needs that did not exist until the means of meeting them...
Full view - About this book

Panel Discussions on National Health Insurance: Prepared Statements of ...

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Ways and Means - 1975 - 131 pages
...certainly unproclaimed as such, are among the major irritant ingredients in Medicine and Politics." He goes on to say that "Common thought and parlance...of medical care 'needed, ' and that if that 'need' uas met, no more would be demanded. This is absurd." He goal on to explain why. "Thar» it a characteristic...
Full view - About this book

Welfare: Needs, Rights, and Risks

Mary Langan - 1998 - 282 pages
...certainly unproclaimed — as such, are among the major irritant ingredients in Medicine and Politics. Common thought and parlance tend to conceal or deny...was met, no more would be demanded. This is absurd. Every advance in medical science creates new needs that did not exist until the means of meeting them...
Limited preview - About this book

Welfare: Needs, Rights, and Risks

Mary Langan - 1998 - 282 pages
...certainly unproclaimed— as such, are among the major irritant ingredients in Medicine and Politics. Common thought and parlance tend to conceal or deny the fact that demand for all practical purposes ^unlimited. The vulgar assumption is that there is a definable amount of medical care 'needed', and...
Limited preview - About this book

From Beveridge to Blair: The First Fifty Years of Britain's Welfare State ...

Margaret Jones, Rodney Lowe - 2002 - 232 pages
...any given time, while demand is unlimited, supply had to be rationed by means other than price.... Common thought and parlance tend to conceal or deny...was met, no more would be demanded. This is absurd. Every advance in medical science creates new needs that did not exist until the means of meeting them...
Limited preview - About this book

Social Security Amendments of 1970: Hearings, Ninety-first Congress, Second ...

United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Finance - 1970
...medical care, he has no sense of responsir and from this many real problems are created. He says : Common thought and parlance tend to conceal or deny the fact that deMad for all practical purposes is unlimited. The vulgar assumption is that *«* is a definable amount...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF