Energy Law and the Environment

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 2006 M08 31
Unsustainable practices worldwide in energy production and consumption have led to a plethora of environmental problems. Until recently environmental law largely overlooked the relevance of energy production and consumption; energy was seen to be of little significance to the advancement of sustainable development. This has changed since 2000 with the global concern attached to climate change, the publication by the United Nations of the World Energy Assessment and the detailed consideration given to this issue at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg in 2002. Australia has been seen to be lagging behind the other major industrialised nations of the world in addressing sustainable energy issues. This book was first published in 2006.

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Contents

V
1
VI
2
VII
3
VIII
5
IX
7
X
8
XI
10
XII
11
XXVIII
92
XXIX
95
XXX
107
XXXI
108
XXXII
110
XXXIII
112
XXXIV
113
XXXV
129

XIII
16
XIV
26
XV
28
XVI
34
XVII
38
XVIII
41
XIX
66
XX
78
XXI
80
XXII
81
XXIII
84
XXIV
85
XXV
87
XXVI
88
XXVII
89
XXXVI
135
XXXVII
136
XXXVIII
139
XXXIX
151
XL
155
XLI
163
XLII
169
XLIII
182
XLIV
190
XLV
198
XLVI
208
XLVII
215
XLVIII
233
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Page 53 - Convention, stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system.
Page 38 - States, no State has the right to use or permit the use of its territory in such a manner as to cause injury by fumes in or to the territory of another or the properties or persons therein, when the case is of serious consequence and the injury is established by clear and convincing evidence.
Page 199 - Non-Legally Binding Authoritative Statement of Principles for a Global Consensus on the Management, Conservation and Sustainable Development of all Types of Forests...
Page 67 - National authorities should endeavour to promote the internalization of environmental costs and the use of economic instruments, taking into account the approach that the polluter should, in principle, bear the cost of pollution, with due regard to the public interest and without distorting international trade and investment.
Page 66 - In order to protect the environment, the precautionary approach shall be widely applied by States according to their capabilities. Where there are threats of serious or irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty shall not be used as a reason for postponing cost-effective measures to prevent environmental degradation.
Page 231 - Protocol by giving written notification to the Depositary. 2. Any such withdrawal shall take effect upon expiry of one year...
Page 225 - Assess, on the basis of all information made available to it in accordance with the provisions of the Convention, the implementation of the Convention by the Parties, the overall effects of the measures taken pursuant to the Convention, in particular environmental, economic and social effects as well as their cumulative impacts and the extent to which progress towards the objective of the Convention is being achieved...
Page 218 - Where there are threats of serious or irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty should not be used as a reason for postponing such measures, taking into account that policies and measures to deal with climate change should be cost-effective so as to ensure global benefits at the lowest possible cost.
Page 221 - If Parties acting jointly do so in the framework of, and together with, a regional economic integration organization, any alteration in the composition of the organization after adoption of this Protocol shall not affect existing commitments under this Protocol. Any alteration in the composition of the organization shall only apply for the...

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About the author (2006)

Rosemary Lyster is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Sydney.

Adrian Bradbrook is Professor of Law at the University of Adelaide.

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