Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1971
McElroy, Dr. W. D., Director, National Science Foundation.
Robbins, Paul, executive director, National Society of Professional

Engineers

Golodner, Jack, executive secretary of the Council of AFL-CIO Unions for

Scientific, Professional & Cultural Employees, accompanied by Sanford

V. Lenz, chairman, Professional, Technical, & Salaried Conference Board,

IUE, AFL-CIO.-

82

93

97

147

83

Comptroller General-April 5, 1971..

National Science Foundation June 11, 1971.

National Science Foundation-July 27, 1971.

Office of Management and Budget-June 28, 1971.

Small Business Administration-June 16, 1971.-.

PART II-BACKGROUND REPORTS

Science Resources Studies Highlights—NSF—July 2, 1971.

Science Resources Studies Highlights-NSF-September 23, 1971.

Subcommittee Letter of September 14, 1971 to NSF-

NSF's reply of October 12, 1971 with studies.-

"Conversion of Scientific and Technical Resources from Defense-Oriented

to Civilian Activities”—George Washington University Report.-

Report on the Conference on Economic Conversion, March 31-April 1, 1971,

by the Coalition on National Priorities and Military Policy ---

PART III_BACKGROUND ARTICLES

“Economic Conversion--A first Priority" by Senator Edward Kennedy, Pro-

fessional Engineer, October 1970-

"Down and Out Along Route 128," by Berkeley Rice, New York Times

Magazine, November 1, 1970----

“U.S. Needs A Strong Finish to Win World Trade Race,” by Emilio Q.

Daddario, New York Times, January 24, 1971.-

“Jobs Lacking for Engineers,” Evening Star, May 5, 1971..

"Gloom in U.S. High Technology" by Dr. Steve Liebmann, New Scientist

and Science Journal, May 20, 1971...

"The Engineers are Redesigning their own Profession,” by Judson Good-

ing, Fortune, June 1971..

"Jobs, the Real Crisis," by Keith W. Bose, Washington Post, June 6, 1971.-

“Kennedy Asks Program for Jobless Engineers," by James Welsh, Eve-

ning Star, June 18, 1971..

“U.S. Effort Asked to Aid New Cities," Washington Post, June 18, 1971.-

"Technical Job Agency Proposed,” St. Petersburg Times, June 19, 1971.-

"Engineers Trapped by Shifts to New Priorities," Chemical and Engineer-

ing News, June 28, 1971.--

"Jobless on Route 128; One Area's Unemployed," by James G. Driscoll,

National Observer, September 18, 1971.--

"For Some, Life Begins With Lost Job," by Robert A. Wright, the New

York Times, July 21, 1971.----

"Thousands of Engineers Lack Jobs," by Daniel Q. Haney, Burlington

County Times, October 21, 1971.--

“Washington Close-up: Peace Requires Economic Action,” by Orr Kelly,

Evening Star, October 26, 1971.-

"Engineering for New Cities,” by Ellis R. Mottur, Professional Engineer,

November 1971.----

"Ranks of Unemployed Undiminished : Route 128 Picture Still Bleak,” by

Barbara Rabinovitz, Boston Herald Traveler, November 1, 1971.--

“Kennedy and McElroy Differ,” Science Magazine, November 5, 1971.---

“The New Poor of Seattle," Washington Post, December 2, 1971.

PART IV-STATEMENTS

Statement from John P. Eberhard, Dean of the School of Architecture and

Environmental Design, State University of New York at Buffalo and

formerly Director of the Institute for Applied Technology of the Na-

tional Bureau of Standards---

Statement from Dr. Robert C. Wood, President of the University of Massa-

chusetts and formerly Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.-

PART IV-STATEMENTS—Continued

Page 352 353 369 372 376 381 382

Statement from the Air Pollution Control Association --
Statement from the American Association of Cost Engineers--
Statement from the American Congress of Surveying and Mapping--
Statement from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.-
Statement from the American Institute of Archiects.-
Statement from the American Institute of Industrial Engineers.-
Statement from the American Nuclear Society--
Statement from the American Society of Certified Engineering Techni-

cians
Statement from the American Society of Landscape Architects--
Statement from the American Society for Metals---
Statement from the Association of Technical Professionals.-
Statement from the Council of Engineers and Scientific Organizations---
Statement from the Department of Public Schools, Providence, R.I.-
Statement from the Geochemical Society----
Statement from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers---
Statement from the International Conference of Police Associations-
Statement from the Mystic Valley Mental Health Association, Inc---
Statement from the National Education Association ---
Statement from the National Security Industrial Association..
Statement from the Occidental College, Los Angeles, Calif.-
Statement from the Society of Aerospace and Process Engineers.
Statement from the Society for General Systems Research.
Statement from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers.
Statement from the Society of Plastics Engineers.
Statement from the Federation of American Scientists_

385
387
388
390
394
400
405
407
412
413
414
417
420
431
433
437
439
440

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONVERSION

PROGRAMS, 1971

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1971

[ocr errors]

U.S. SENATE,
SPECIAL SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION OF THE
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

Washington, D.C. The special subcommittee met at 9:55 a.m., pursuant to call, in room 4232, New Senate Office Building, Senator Edward M. Kennedy, chairman of the subcommittee presiding.

Present: Senator Kennedy.

Committee staff members present: Ellis R. Mottur, scientific adviser; and Roy H. Millenson, minority professional staff member.

Senator KENNEDY. The subcommittee will come to order.

America's greatest resource is the talent of its people. The skills of our scientists and engineers constitute a major portion of that bank of talent. Through their ability and innovative spirit, we can solve or reduce many of our problems, and help shape the world the way we want it to be.

For 25 years the bulk of our technical talent has been devoted to the defense effort and over the past decade-to the space program. The results have been spectacular.

But today the need for their talent is greatest on the domestic front, in areas like health, housing, transportation, crime control, public sanitation, and pollution. This is where our problems are; this is where the action should be.

Yet at this time of maximum need, between one and two hundred thousand technical personnel across the country are out of work, or employed in jobs below their skills. Since each working scientist or engineer generates six to 10 other jobs, this means a potential loss of over a million jobs throughout the Nation. And it means that it will take us that much longer before we can bring our social problems under control.

This situation is intolerable. Quite apart from the hardships inflicted on the individuals, their families, and communities, we are misusing our most precious national resource-human talent. An enormous national investment went into the formal education and onthe-job training of this technical work force. As long as they are not using their skills, that investment is being wasted, and the whole Nation is the loser.

We must put our scientists and engineers back to work, and we must direct their efforts toward the Nation's real needs. Technical

« PreviousContinue »