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i financial contributions of such donated commodities in such

2 public or private nonprofit institutions or organizations, 3 agencies, or political subdivisions of a State.

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APPROPRIATIONS AUTHORIZED

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"SEC. 708. (a) The Secretary of Agriculture may uti6 lize the programs authorized under this title in carrying out 7 'the provisions of clause (2) of section 32 of the Act ap

proved August 24, 1935, as amended (49 Stat. 774, 7 9 U.S.C. 614c). 10

"(b) In addition to any other funds which may be 11

available, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums

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as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this title.

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pursuant to the authorization contained in section 708 of this

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title, not to exceed $50,000,000 shall be made available for

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the fiscal year ending June 30, 1972, not to exceed $100,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1973, not to exceed $150,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1974, for grants-in-aid pursuant to the provisions of this

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title, less

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“(1) not to exceed 31 per centum thereof which per centum is hereby made available to the Secretary for his administrative expenses under this title;

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“(2) direct expenditures by the Secretary for agri

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cultural commodities and other foods to be distributed

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among the States and such public or private nonprofit institutions or organizations, agencies, or political subdivisions of a State, participating in the nutrition pro

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gram under this title.

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"RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER LAWS

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"SEO. 710. No part of the cost of any program under

8 this title may be treated as income or benefits to any eligible 9 individual for the purpose of any other program or provision

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12 "SEC. 711. None of the provisions of this title shall be 13 construed to prevent a recipient of a grant or a contract from 14 entering into an agreement with a profitmaking organiza15 tion to carry out the provisions and purposes of this title.”

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Appendix 3

STATEMENTS SUBMITTED BY THE HEARING

AUDIENCE

During the course of the hearing a form was made available by the chairman to those attending who wished to make suggestions and recommendations but were unable to testify because of time limitations. The form read as follows:

If there had been time for everyone to speak at the hearing on “Problems with Medicare and Medicaid Coverage,” in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, on June 14, 1971, I would have said :

The following replies were received:

CLARENCE R. NEWLANDER, WOONSOCKET I have read about the Federal Government wanting the elderly to become interested in physical fitness. What can we do to get them interested ? In my opinion the playing of shuffleboard is one sport that the aged can enjoy and get exercise. Also it is a competitive sport and requires a bit on concentration. This certainly is good therapy and medicine to the brain no matter how old one may be. Now my question is how do we proceed in trying to have a shuffleboard court constructed with the assistance of the Government? Once the court is built and equipped, the cost of playing the game is nill. One only has to tour the State of Florida to be convinced that shuffleboard is the sport of the aged. Even when they reach to be some 80 odd years of their lives. A good healthy sport for both women and men.

The following appeared in the Providence Journal of June 18, 1971. According to Todays Health, an unnamed physician regards horseshoe pitching as better exercise than golf or bowling. Having played two games last weekend I fully agree. Each shoe weighs 212 pounds. It must be picked up, aimed and thrown to a stake 40 feet away. All of this brings into play the muscle of the hand, wrist, arm, shoulder, back and leg. A competitor in tournament play walks five miles between stakes and bends down at least 500 times. He lifts and throws more than a ton of metal.

In your flier I see that you are a co-sponser of S-1588 a bill that would provide for the construction and maintenance of multi-purpose community center for senior citizen. It is my sincere hope that if this bill is passed by both Houses of Congress and signed by the President, that included would be provisions for the construction of several shuffleboard courts and horseshoe courts. What could be a better builder of health than enjoying the good old sunshine?

In regards to malnutrition of the aged let me suggest that when speakers bring up the subject of malnutrition to older people, they should tell these people why they should try and eat all of the basic foods, whereby their bodies will be getting all of the minerals needed for the proper functioning of body muscles, organs, and cells. When the body is robbed of these essential minerals certain physiological and psychological reactions occur.

Many of the older people do not realize that the human body needs these minerals, and they should be told about them, and how the lack of the body not receiving them can affect one's health.

I am 67 years old and upon retiring took up the hobby of studying rocks and minerals. I do a little lecturing to school children and at times to adult groups, at no cost, because I enjoy doing it and it keeps me occupied. That is the reason

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I inentioned the fact that speakers should inform the aged why minerals are needed by the human body. The study of nutrition and certainly that about minerals is indeed quite fascinating and educational.

ISRAEL NADEAU, WOONSOCKET

That you and your colleagues should support the bills to give more to education, health, lunches and transportation for the elderly so they can go to Doctors and for shopping for what they need for food and survival. Many have no transportation of any kind and live out of the way and also I would suggest to keep the hot lunches going and even increase the lunches twice a week.

MRS. MARIA FREDETTE, WOONSOCKET Why don't we have help from Medicaid, when we have to go over the optometrist, lenses cost so much.

I am due to go for my eyes, but I haven't got the money I have to wait. Thank you.

BERTHE BROUILLARD, WOONSOCKET I don't know how to write English very much but I do my best. The problem of the Nursing Home will be finished if only the government or the State had a very large Nursing Home in Woonsocket and close. The individual Nursing Home which they don't treat the patient right in some Nursing Homes they have cats and dogs that go in the patient's rooms—afraid or not the dog and cat come first. I know how they feel cause I am afraid of cats myself.

There is one in Pascoag, R.I. controlled by the State and they have good food and good care and I think that's what they deserve they have such a short time to live.

LOUIS P. HUBERT, SB., NORTH SMITHFIELD We urge you to support and fight for legislation and passage in Medicare to include prescription drugs, glasses and dental care, we are pensioners who are self-supporting in the sense that we have a home, able to help each other for our needs, but the cost of prescription drugs for the wife who has a heart condition, and according to welfare we are receiving pensions from private sources not much, but we cannot get Medicaid, and that is why we are asking your support. We noticed in the different bills you are advocating that the majority of them concern the elderly, I wish to thank you again for the programs you are presenting.

LEO AND DELLA BRISSETTE, WOONSOCKET First of all when it come time to all of you peoples to get increases there are no delay whatsoever. When we had lately 10 percent increase, it took so long to get it, food has climbed every week to make up for it, and more. It seem so the articles the Old folk need goes up skyhigh, so the increase of Blue Cross and Federal increase, by July, We will be in the Red, with that little 10 percent, So I would say it again, after 65 years old we should not pay anytime 1 red cent for those benefit. Thanks Mr. Senator Pell.

LAURA D. GOSSELIN, WOONSOCKET My deepest appreciation for what you have already done for the Aged, and I hope you will keep up the good work.

Is it a fact that anyone who has had eye surgery for Glaucoma, or cataracts may now have their eyes tested and glasses made without charge to the Patient? I had surgery on both eyes in 1966, for Glaucoma.

Only those who need reading and also glasses for general wear knows what a Blessing this could be: I am 76 years old.

Thanks again for the wonderful help you have been to the aged. Gratefully yours.

EVA PARADIS, WOONSOCKET

My worse problem is transportation. It costs me $3.60 for a visit to the doctor. I live in the North end where there are no buses at all. I used to walk down town to get a bus to Social, but now my legs are bad and I cannot do so any more.

I have no car, so I have to depend on cabs for everything. In years past, we did all our business on Main Street.—Pay bills, see the Doctor, the Dentist, go to the bank, and do our shopping, all in one trip. But we cannot do this anymore since most of the stores are closed because the merchants have moved away. The Drs. are on the outskirt of the city (most of them), and the shopping centers are at the 4 corners of the city also. Either I walk to Main Street, (a 30 minute walk which I cannot do now) to get a bus to and from Walnut Hill, a shopping center or take a cab and pay over $4.00 to get there and back, you have to make sure that you need something.

Coming from my last visit to the doctor at Park Square I took a bus to Main Street, It was an old dilapidated one and the smell of gas was enough to make you sick. We went all over Fairmount before reaching Main Street. I don't think fumes like these are sanitary for anyone. Then it cost me another dollar in a cab to get home.

Except at Beaupre's where we can wait inside, and it is the bus stop for Social and Walnut Hill we have to wait and stand outside on the other street corners for Prov. Pascoag, remaining buses and for cabs; no place to sit and outside, weather it is hot, cold or rainy. Now they are talking of taking away the Providence buses. I know there are fewer riders, but there are still some who work in Providence or go to school there. I have relatives in Providence, Pawtucket and West Warwick, and the only way I can visit them is by bus. I called Mr. St Germain recently and he told me that the people do not want to pay. Well, the working already have 43 of their pay and maybe more taken off in taxes for different things, already.

Not long ago, I wrote to the President about too many imports coming in the country from all parts of the Globe. Most everything is made outside the U.S. and outside of R.I.

I also mentioned the transportation problem. He transferred my letter to the Transportation Dept. in Washington. They sent me a lot of leaflets showing that the Urban Transportation has been helped in Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit and many other large cities in the country and that they (The Transp. Dept.) were working on a system that would come into effect in 1982, and that over $3 billion are allowed for transportation improvements.

I want to thank you for your interest to the older people. It is a comfort to us.

Anything that will be done for the elderlies will most welcome and greatly appreciated I am sure.

NANCY J. BOWDEN, RIVERSIDE As a nutritionist and teacher of nutritionists at Framingham State College, I feel there is a need to request that amendments be made to Medicare to authorize home health agencies to be paid for home visits by dietitians and nutritionists and to stipulate qualifications and duties of nutrition consultants in the regulations of home health agencies.

Back when I was working for the Heart Disease Control Program, one of the nutritionists in the Washington office used to delight in telling the tale of how former Treasury Secretary Dillon's folks sent a limousine for her one day to take her to his mother's home to help them out with a sodium restricted diet, one of the most difficult to implement. So it seems reasonable to me that those who depend upon Medicare for health services might also need the services of a nutritionist to help a family implement a diet which may be the main treatment to alleviate symptoms, as a sodium restricted diet sometimes is in the case of a congestive heart failure patient.

At the same time, the qualifications of persons who can be paid to render such service must be rigidly specified.

Thank you for considering this matter.

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