Science and the Endangered Species Act

Front Cover
National Academies Press, 1995 M10 13 - 271 pages
1 Review
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is a far-reaching law that has sparked intense controversies over the use of public lands, the rights of property owners, and economic versus environmental benefits.

In this volume a distinguished committee focuses on the science underlying the ESA and offers recommendations for making the act more effective.

The committee provides an overview of what scientists know about extinction‚€"and what this understanding means to implementation of the ESA. Habitat‚€"its destruction, conservation, and fundamental importance to the ESA‚€"is explored in detail.

The book analyzes:

  • Concepts of species‚€"how the term "species" arose and how it has been interpreted for purposes of the ESA.
  • Conflicts between species when individual species are identified for protection, including several case studies.
  • Assessment of extinction risk and decisions under the ESA‚€"how these decisions can be made more effectively.

The book concludes with a look beyond the Endangered Species Act and suggests additional means of biological conservation and ways to reduce conflicts. It will be useful to policymakers, regulators, scientists, natural-resource managers, industry and environmental organizations, and those interested in biological conservation.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Bibliographic information