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LAW MANUAL

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BY
CLINTON H. BLAKE, JR., A.M., LL.B.
(OF THE NEW YORK AND FEDERAL BARS)

Author of
“The Law of Architect, Owner & Contractor,The Law of Architecture
and Building,” Architectural Quicksands,” “Legal ‘Don'ts' for
Architects," "Acquiring a Home," Etc. Editor, Legal Depart-
ment, The American Architect and The Architectural Review.
Special lecturer on the Law of Architecture, 1921-1922,
School of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of

Technology.

THE PENCIL POINTS LIBRARY

New York
THE PENCIL POINTS PRESS, INC. .

hon. art.
handscape-C
wahr
S-28-25
117434

COPYRIGHT, 1924, BY
THE PENCIL POINTS PRESS, INC.

All Rights Reserved

Printed in the United States of America by
J. J. LITTLE AND IVES COMPANY, NEW YORK
TO MY FRIEND

REGINALD LINDSEY SWEET

WHOSE WORK JUSTIFIES MY CONTENTION

THAT A TRUE ARTIST MAY BE

A CAPABLE BUSINESS MAN

PREFACE

The present work is based in large measure upon the series of articles published in The American Architect in 1921 and 1922, under the title of “Architectural Quicksands” and upon the additional discussions of the problems of the architect which have since appeared in the Legal Department of that publication.

It is presented in response to the many requests which I have received that the subject matter of these articles and discussions be presented in book form and that the special forms of contract between architect and client to which I have from time to time referred in my writings be made generally available to the profession.

In placing this material in book form, it has been completely revised and brought down to date and much new matter has been added. No effort has been made to present a book making available to the legal and architectural professions the citations of court decisions. That phase of the subject I have already treated in "The Law of Architecture and Building.”

My present endeavor has been to approach the subject from a quite different angle. It is my purpose here to place before the architect, very informally, typical examples of the dangers which may beset him in the practice of his profession; to hang up along the architectural highway, as it were, a sufficient number of danger signals, so that he may be warned as he approaches unsafe ground; to emphasize the practical business considerations which today enter into the practice of architecture; to suggest, as best I may,

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