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Letters, prepared and supplementary statements, etc.—Continued

Chamber of Commerce of the United States, statement of the.--
Cross, G. L., president, the University of Oklahoma, letter to Chair-

man Powell
Doyle, Hon. Clyde, a Representative in Congress from the State of

California, letter from Phil H. Putnam, president, Compton College,

Compton, Calif.
Fidler, William P. American Association of University Professors, letter

to Chairman Green.
Fleming, David D., director of development, Monmouth College,

Monmouth, Ill., letter to Chairman Green.
Giaimo, Hon. Robert N., a Representative in Congress from the State

of Connecticut, letter from Marion C. Sheridan..
Goheen, Robert F., president, Princeton University, letter to Chair-

man Green..
Green, Hon. Edith, a Member of Congress from the State of Oregon,
and chairman of the Special Subcommittee on Education:
Message from the President of the United States relative to

American education, House Document No. 92.-

Statement by -
Hecht, George J., chairman, The American Parents Committee, Inc.,

letter to Chairman Green..
Jefferson, Joe, executive secretary, Association of College Admissions

Counselors, letter to Chairman Green.--
Jenkins, Timothy L., national affairs vice president, National Student
Association:

Appendix 1. Federal aid to higher education --
Appendix 2. Federal aid for construction in instructions of higher

learning -

Appendix 3. Financial assistance to students
Kerr, Clark, president, the University of California, Berkeley, Calif.,

letter to Chairman Powell, enclosing a resolution
Kornegay, Hon. Horace R., a resentative in Congress from the

State of North Carolina, letter to Chairman Green -
Lemieux, A. A., president, Seattle University, telegram to Chairman

Green.
Lieuallen, R. E., president, Oregon College of Education, Monmouth,

Oreg., letter to Chairman Green...
Lowell, C. Stanley, associate director, Protestants and Other Americans

United for Separation of Church and State, statement submitted by -
Marsh, Joseph F., president, Concord College, Athens, W. Va., letter

to Chairman Green...
Martin, LeRoy A., president, University of Chattanooga, telegram to

Chairman Green..
Millar, Branford P., president, Portland State College, Portland,

Oreg., letter to Chairman Green..
Multer, Hon. Abraham J., a Representative in Congress from the

State of New York, statement of.
Odegaard, president, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash., letter

to Chairman Powell.---
Pusey, Nathan M., president, Harvard University:

Letter to Chairman Green, dated March 14, 1961.

Letter to Chairman Powell, dated February 20, 1961.
Reitz, J. Wayne, president, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.,

letter to Chairman Green...
Ribicoff, Hon. Abraham A., Secretary of Health, Education, and
Welfare:
Average market yields of taxable Treasury bonds, by month, for

1956, 1958, and 1960.--
Average computed annual rate on interest-bearing obligations

forming a part of the public debt, end of fiscal year, 1953–60.-
Comparison of estimated number of scholarships allocated to

States under the terms of the administration-proposed scholar-
ship bill and solely on the basis of the number of high school

graduates in each State (table)--
Estimated number of scholarships and amount of money allocated

to States under the terms of the administration-proposed re-
vision of title II of NDEA (table) --

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Letters, prepared and supplementary statements, etc.—Continued
Ribicoff, Hon. Abraham A., Secretary of Health, etc.—Continued

Memorandum on the impact of the first amendment to the Con-

stitution upon Federal aid to education, by Alanson W.

Willcox, General Counsel, Department of Health, Education,

and Welfare.

Physical facilities needs of American higher education, 1961–70.

Chart 1. Annual need for physical plant expenditures,

higher education, by function, 1960–70..

Chart 2. Cumulative need for physical plant, higher educa-

tion, 1960-70.-

Table 1. Sources of funds used to finance capital facilities

for the period 1951-55 and the year 1958–59.-

Table 2. Projection of sources and amounts of funds for

plant expansion, 1960–70.-

Projects, and beds within projects, total cost and Federal share

of such costs, by amount and percent distribution: Classified
by type of agency, December 3ỉ, 1960 (table)--

State scholarship commissions financial need assessment-

Summary of Federal funds provided to private institutions of

higher education, 1957–58.-

Summary of projects, costs, and Federal contributions under the

Public Health Service Act (title VI), as amended.

The contribution of private institutions of higher education...

Richards, John R., chancellor, Oregon State system of higher educa-

tion, Eugene, Oreg., letter to Chairman Green...

Roberts, Dr. Eunice, chairman, Committee on Higher Education,

American Association of University Women, prepared statement

of..

Rodino, Hon. Peter W., Jr., a Representative in Congress from the

State of New Jersey, statement of --

Strand, A. L., president, Oregon State College, Corvallis, Oreg.,

letter to Chairman Green...

The American Association of Land-Grant Colleges and State Univer-

sities, and the State Universities Association, publication entitled

“Recommendations on Desirable National Action Affecting Higher

Education”

Ullman, Hon. Al, a Representative in Congress from the State of

Oregon:

Birkhimer, R. O., junior college consultant, State of Illinois

Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, letter from..

Crull, Howard D., superintendent of schools, Port Huron public

schools, Port Huron, Mich., letter from..

Eshleman, Fred, dean, Henry Ford Community College, Dear-

born, Mich., letter from..
Estimated Allotment of $200 million to States for construction of

public community junior colleges under proposed bill H.R.

16 (table)
Fordyce, Joseph W., president, Central Florida Junior College,

Ocala, Fla., letter from.

Hall, George L., dean, Casper College, Casper, Wyo., letter

from..

Morgan, H. J., Citizens State Bank, Clarinda, Iowa, letter from..

Putnam, Phil 'H., president, Compton College, Compton, Calif.,

letter from..

Rawlinson, Howard, dean, Mount Vernon High School and

Community College, Mount Vernon, 111., letter from

Sharar, Paul B., president, Iowa Association of Public Junior

Colleges, letter from...

Statement of..--.

Van Zandt, Hon. James E., a Representative in Congress from the

State of Pennsylvania, title XI of bill introduced by -
Weeks, I. D., president, State University of South Dakota, letter to

Chairman Powell..

Wells, Herman B., president, Indiana University, letter to Chairman

Powell..---

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AID TO HIGHER EDUCATION

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 1961

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
SPECIAL SUBCOMMITTEE ON EDUCATION
OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND LABOR,

Washington, D.C. The subcommittee met at 10:05 a.m., pursuant to notice, in room 429, Old House Office Building, Hon. Edith Green (chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.

Present: Representatives Green, Giaimo, Brademas, Smith of Iowa, Quie, Goodell, Ashbrook, Pucinski, Frelinghuysen, and Kearns.

Also present: Nicholas H. Zumas, subcommittee counsel; Melvin W. Sneed, minority counsel; Wray Smith, education chief of the full committee; and Betty Pryor, subcommittee clerk.

Mrs. GREEN. The meeting of the Special Subcommittee on Education will come to order.

Since this is the first official meeting of this subcommittee I would like to present the members who are present.

On my right, Congressman Giaimo, of Connecticut.
Congressman Brademas is at another meeting on education.
Congressman Smith, of Iowa.
Congressman Quie, of Minnesota.
Congressman Goodell, of New York.
Congressman Ashbrook, of Ohio.

I have a statement that I had planned to make a part of the record or to read. Unless there is an objection, I am going to save the time of the Secretary this morning and ask that it be made a part of the record rather than presenting it m

elf. (The statement is as follows:)

PRELIMINARY STATEMENT OF HON. EDITH GREEN, CHAIRMAN OF SPECIAL

SUBCOMMITTEE ON EDUCATION

For most of us in Congress, legislation often becomes a question of priority. We weigh State and district responsibilities against Federal needs, we balance at times on some invisible high wire way about the ground-long-range national interests against immediate priorities, and, we hope, ultimately, that in some mysterious way a precise combination of wisdom and concern for the needs of the people will prevail.

It is a process that does not always succeed. And one instance where it has not succeeded, where, I frar, we have been deceiving ourselves, is in the matter of education and Federal assistance. We have talked about the shortage of college facilities; of the need for more college classrooms, libraries, and laboratories.

We have lamented the fact that one-third of our bright young men and women fail to pursue a college education. The reason: lack of financial resources.

1

We have discussed these problems a number of years now, but we have done precious little about dealing with them. We have not granted them high priority. I suspect in so doing we have substituted restraint for wisdom, and caution for concern.

I do not mean to suggest that we can abandon caution and restraint, and above all, we cannot abandon the patient effort to achieve understanding of divergent points of view. None of us here can dodge the fact that in this bill, as in the companion legislation for Federal aid for the secondary and elementary schools, there will arise questions of assistance to religious schools. No one, I believe, can fail to appreciate the tremendous contribution these schools of more than one denomination, have made to meeting the Nation's educational needs. At the same time, we cannot blink at the fact that there are grave constitutional questions involved-questions that cannot be set aside by merely wishing to do so. Only with the prevalence of good will on both sides can these conflicting views be reconciled. It would be tragically ironic if we were to fail altogether in the struggle to pass education legislation because it is impossible to enact such legislation in a form completely satisfactory to all. Should this happen, the entire Nation would be the loser. Good will, mutual understanding and patience, and a realization of the need to act where heretofore we have only talked-these must be the keynote of our deliberations.

Our present bill, H.R. 5266, the College Academic Facilities and Scholarship Act, is, I think, an urgently necessary and responsible attempt on the part of the Federal Government to assist higher education in the United States. It is no longer a matter of choice; but rather one of necessity. Then, I am pleased to report that a number of highly qualified men and women have accepted our invitation to offer testimony before the subcommittee. These are educators and Government officials who have studied the problems attached to Federal aid to education, and who have devoted considerable time and thought to the issues present. I am particularly pleased to announce that the Secretary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare has accepted our invitation and will appear before us this morning, and that his predecessor, former Secretary Arthur Flemming, recently appointed president of the University of Oregon, has also kindly accepted our invitation and will be present tomorrow morning at 10 a.m.

We hope to hold our hearings today through Friday, March 17, conducting them both in the mornings and afternoons.

I know that I speak for the other members of the subcommittee when I say that I appreciate the time and concern the witnesses have given to this bill and related bills. I ask unanimous consent that the administration bill, related bills before the committee, and the pertinent parts of the President's message on education be printed at this point in the hearing record.

Secretary Ribicoff needs little introduction to the subcommittee. A former Congressman, a former Governor of the State of Connecticut, he has dealt with the very issues confronting us today. Secretary Ribicoff, on behalf of the subcommittee and myself, it is a pleasure to welcome you.

Mrs. GREEN. Unless there is objection, I would also like to ask that the President's message on education be made a part of the record at this point.

(The document follows:)

[H. Doc. 92, 87th Cong., 1st sess. ] MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES RELATIVE TO AMERICAN

EDUCATION

To the Congress of the United States:

Our progress as a Nation can be no swifter than our progress in education. Our requirements for world leadership, our hopes for economic growth, and the demands of citizenship itself in an era such as this all require the maximum development of every young American's capacity.

The human mind is our fundamental resource. A balanced Federal program must bo well beyond incentives for investment in plant and equipment. It must include equally determined measures to invest in human beings—both in their basic education and training and in their more advanced preparation for professional work. Without such measures, the Federal Government will not be carrying out its responsibilities for expanding the base of our economic and military strength.

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