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Forty percent of the total budgeted costs of grant-assisted migrant health projects have been met from other than Public Health Service grant sources.

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EXAMPLES OF CONTRIBUTIONS FROM OTHER SOURCES -

Migrant Health Project
Grants

: 40%

60%

Contributions from other
than grant sources

Physicians' services
Dental care
Nursing services
Publicity and explanation

of project to community

groups Laboratory services Administrative services

(Receptionist, clerical,

and janitorial services) Professional consultation from

State health department staff Services of interpreter for

Spanish-speaking migrants

Donated space for clinics
Donated equipment or supplies
Transportation of patients
Health education literature

and films
Costs of hospital care for

cases referred by project

physicians Other volunteered services

or materials Cash

Counties with the greatest number of migrants have the highest percentage of coverage by grant-assisted project services (March 31, 1964).

Counties with 3,000 or more migrants at peak

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Public agencies have taken leadership in migrant health project development. Voluntary groups have filled the gap when others were not ready. They have also helped to interest other agencies in applying

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Regardless of formal sponsorship, most projects have broad community support. The following groups and interests are among those involved: Private individuals:

Public agencies—Continued Physicians

Employment service Dentists

Surplus food distribution cenNurses

ters Nursing students

Voluntary organizations: Clerks and stenographers

Church groups
Migrant workers who assist Medical societies

in cleaning clinic quarters, Farm bureaus
"babysit” with children só Red Cross
mothers can attend clinic, Parent-teacher associations
etc.

Growers' associations
Growers

Kiwanis clubs Growers' wives

Lions clubs Pharmacists

Visiting nurse associations Local newspaper and radio Travelers Aid men

Tuberculosis and health assoPublic agencies:

ciations Health departments

Local hospitals Welfare departments

Salvation Army Schools

Girl Scouts County hospitals

Voluntary summer schools Colleges and universities

and day care centers for City and county law enforce- migrant children ment agencies

Shrine Hospital Agricultural extension service

The majority of project grants are for less than $20,000.

Amount of grant

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Grantees budgeted the project grant dollar chiefly for health services,

Budget items

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Most projects provide a combination of family clinic, nursing, health education, and sanitation services. The following indicates the types of services offered separately or in combination with others by projects receiving grant assistance:

Family health service clinics at one or more locations in the project area, usually scheduled at night.

Nursing services in the migrant labor camps, in family clinics, and in day-care centers and summer schools for migrant children.

Sanitation services including camp inspections, work with camp owners and occupants to get improvements made in

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