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COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

GEORGE H. MAHON, Texas, Chairman JAMIE L. WHITTEN, Mississippi

FRANK T. BOW, Ohio JOHN J. ROONEY, New York

CHARLES R. JONAS, North Carolloa ROBERT L. F. SIKES, Florida

ELFORD A. CEDERBERG, Michigan OTTO E. PASSMAN, Louisiana

JOHN J. RHODES, Arizona JOE L. EVINS, Tennessee

WILLIAM E. MINSHALL, Ohio EDWARD P. BOLAND, Massachusetts ROBERT H, MICHEL, Illinois WILLIAM H. NATCHER, Kentucky SILVIO O. CONTE, Massachusetts DANIEL J. FLOOD, Pennsylvania

GLENN R. DAVIS, Wisconsin TOM STEED, Oklahoma

HOWARD W. ROBISON, New York GEORGE E. SHIPLEY, Illinois

GARNER E. SHRIVER, Kansas JOHN M. SLACK, West Virginia

JOSEPH M. MCDADE, Pennsylvania JOHN J. FLYNT, JR., Georgia

MARK ANDREWS, North Dakota NEAL SMITH, Iowa

LOUIS C. WYMAN, New Hampshire
ROBERT N. GIAIMO, Connecticut

BURT L. TALCOTT, California
JULIA BUTLER HANSEN, Washington DONALD W. RIEGLE, JR., Michigan
JOSEPH P. ADDABBO, New York

WENDELL WYATT, Oregon
JOHN J. MCFALL, California

JACK EDWARDS, Alabama W. R. HULL, JR., Missouri

DEL CLAWSON, California EDWARD J. PATTEN, New Jersey

WILLIAM J. SCHERLE, Iowa CLARENCE D. LONG, Maryland

ROBERT C. MCEWEN, New York SIDNEY R. YATES, Illinois

JOHN T. MYERS, Indiana
BOB CASEY, Texas

J. KENNETH ROBINSON, Virginia
DAVID PRYOR, Arkansas
FRANK E. EVANS, Colorado
DAVID R. OBEY, Wisconsin
EDWARD R. ROYBAL, California
WILLIAM D. HATHAWAY, Maine
NICK GALIFIANAKIS, North Carolina
LOUIS STOKES, Ohio
J. EDWARD ROUSH, Indiana
K. GUNN MCKAY, Utah
TOM BEVILL, Alabama

PAUL M. WILSON, Clerk and Staf Director

WILLIAM GERALD BOLING
GEORGE E. EVANS
ROBERT B. FOSTER
JOHN M. GARRITY
HAROLD A. GRIFFIN
AUBREY A. GUNNELS
JAY B. HOWE
THOMAS J. KINGFIELD
ROBERT L. KNISELY
KEITH F. MAINLAND
MILTON B. MEREDITH

STAFF ASSISTANTS
AMERICO S. MICONI
DEMPSEY B. MIZELLE
ENID MORRISON
ROBERT M. MOYER
PETER J. MURPHY, Jr.
HENRY A, NEIL, Jr.
ROBERT C. NICHOLAS III
BYRON S. NIELSON
JOHN G. PLASHAL
SAMUEL R. PRESTON
DONALD E. RICHBOURG

EARL C. SILSBY
G. HOMER SKARIN
CHARLES W. SNOPGRASS
HUNTER L. SPILLAN
PAUL E. THOMSON
GEORGE A. URIAN
DEREK J. VANDER SCHAAF
EUGENE B. WILHELM
J. DAVID WILLSON
THAYER A. WOOD

SURVEYS AND INVESTIGATIONS
C. R. ANDERSON, Director
LEROY R. KIRKPATRICK, First Assistant

WILLIE C. LAW, Second Assistant NOTE.-This Surveys and Investigations supervisory staff is supplemented by selected personnel borrowed on a reimbursable basis for varying lengths of time from various agencies to staff up specific studies and Investigations. The current average annual fulltime personnel equivalent is approximately 42.

GERARD J. CHOUINARD
JANET LOU DAMERON
BEATRICE T. DEW
PAUL V. FARMER
DANIEL V. GUN SHOWS

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT
GEMMA M. HICKEY
VIRGINIA MAY KEYSER
FRANCES MAY
LAWRENCE C. MILLER
MARILYN R. QUINNEY

FRANCIS W. Sady
MARY ALICE SAUER
DALE M. SHULAW
AUSTIN G. SMITH
RANDOLPH THOMAS

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DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR AND HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1973

TESTIMONY OF MEMBERS OF CONGRESS AND INTER

ESTED INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS

THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1972.

LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING

WITNESS HON. WILLIAM F. RYAN, A REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF NEW YORK

Mr. FLOOD. The committee will come to order,

We now have the pleasure of hearing what we refer to as our public witnesses as distinguished from what we call "government” witnesses. Who would be better qualified to speak for the public than the distinguished gentleman from New York, Hon. William F. Ryan of the 20th District of the great State of New York.

Mr. Ryan. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I greatly appreciate this opportunity to testify once again before this distinguished subcommittee on the necessity of mounting a fullscale Federal assault on the devastating disease of childhood lead poisoning

Sometimes it is called the silent epidemic; sometimes it is called ghetto malaria. But no matter what it goes by, the fact remains that childhood lead poisoning continues needlessly to plague the children of America. Each year thousands of young children between the ages of 1 and 6 are afflicted by this dread disease. The exact number of youngsters poisoned is unknown, for there are still far too few programs to screen children for lead poisoning. Even so, the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare has estimated that each year some 400,000 children are subjected to lead-based paint poisoning.

As a result, some 16,000 youngsters require treatment. An additional 3,200 suffer moderate to severe brain damage. And 800 are so severely afflicted that they require institutionalization for the remainder of their lives.

And for another 200 children there is no future at all—not even the tragic existence of permanent institutionalization—for they will die as a result of this vicious crippler of young children. Two hundred children a year.

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