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Mr. WIRTH. I think one thing is very clear, if we don't do it, nobody else is going to, and we do have that responsibility, as the remaining super power, which we have all said for so long. And if the United States ducks its responsibility, probably everybody else is going to do it, as well. If we meet our responsibility and do it aggressively and clearly, which the administration intends to do, then we are in a much better position for whatever leverage is available to us in the international community.

Mr. SHARP. Well, I think that is true. I think it is very clear, if we do nothing, that nothing gets done or very little will get done. I just want to add the voices of those in helping to bring pressure to bear on some of the other folks, too.

Mr. WIRTH. Absolutely. We are committed to that and that is why the President's goal of having this action plan and having this framework completed by the end of August is so very important, and we can clearly point out where we are, where we think we are and have measured that and looked at that, and that gives us then the ability to go back to other countries.

What the enforcement mechanism is going to be, what the international reporting mechanism is going to be, none of this has yet been fleshed out, and those negotiations will be going on over the next year and a half, as well, to figure out how do you determine whether a country has, in fact, achieved its goal, what is the baseline going to be, what are the measurements against that goal going to be. When you get into joint implementation, who gets credit, do we get credit if we do a program with the Malaysians, do they get credit, what is the tradeoff between the two. These are all very difficult technical questions, but we must begin in our own backyard.

Mr. SHARP. I certainly wish you well and look forward to working with you folks, because this is a highly complex and very important move that we are undertaking, and I think that it behooves uswhich sounds as if you folks are committed to—to be as thorough and as comprehensive and as open in the process as we can be, because to be successful, we are going to have to obviously embark on a policy that is ultimately acceptable to the American people not to mention-other governments have to worry about their people, and then that acceptability I think will be based on how much confidence there is that we are identifying the problem correctly and we know what we are talking about and we are moving aggressively where we can and where we can cost-effectively.

I am sure you don't need that lecture, but I have to remind myself of our responsibilities from time to time. Especially, the atmosphere on Capitol Hill this week is such that the American people ought to be reminding everybody what their responsibilities are.

Mr. WIRTH. Mr. Chairman, thank you very much and we look forward to working with you and the committee.

Mr. SHARP. Good.
Mr. Crapo, did you have anything?
Mr. CRAPO. I just had two items, Mr. Chairman.

First, Congressman Hastert had an opening statement and I would ask unanimous consent that it be made a part of the record.

Mr. SHARP. Without objection, it will be.
We will hold it open, if there are others.

Mr. CRAPO. That was my other point. I know a number of members have conflicts today and I would ask unanimous consent that the record be held open for questions and statements, if that would be possible.

Mr. SHARP. We certainly will do that.
Thank you very much.
(Whereupon, at 11:54 a.m., the hearing was adjourned.]
[The following statements were submitted for the record.)

STATEMENT OF HON. J. DENNIS HASTERT Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I appreciate the chance to be here for this subcommittee's hearing on global warming. Certainly, Mr. Chairman, your continued interest should be commended.

As I recall from our last hearing on this issue, we had some noteworthy scientists testify. They made excellent comments and explained their theories carefully. But none was willing to say that there's a cause-and-effect relationship between the concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gases and global climate change. This is similar to what most scientists seem to be saying-or not saying. Maybe we as policy makers should take this seriously. All this is why I noted with interest President Clinton's comments on Earth Day, and why I'm curious about what he meant when he talked about the administration producing plans—by August-for emissions reductions.

I'm pleased to have these distinguished members of President Clinton's team here today, and I certainly look forward to the testimony.

STATEMENT OF HON. GARY A. FRANKS Mr. Chairman, I would like to thank you for holding today's meeting on Global Warming. I look forward to hearing the testimony to be presented today.

Although there is consensus that the Global climate has warmed, there does not appear to be agreement as to its effects. This is a very important point to consider when constructing policy measures to address this issue. The measures we take will not be responsible ones if they are not based on scientific data. I can not stress this point enough.

For example, there are efforts to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide. There is evidence, however, which supports the notion that increases in carbon dioxide do always have negative effects. Results from controlled studies demonstrate that a 50 percent increase in levels of carbon dioxide, will increase crop yields, double the water-use efficiency of most of the earth's vegetation, and possibly triple the productivity of forests.

In light of such information, we should resist efforts to set limits on how much carbon dioxide the Nation emits or any other greenhouse gases, unless scientific data is presented to justify such restrictions. Let me be clear and state that should scientific data support such restrictions, all measures should be taken to correct the negative effects.

It is my hope, that the proposals outlined today, take into consideration sicentific studies being taken on global warming.

STATEMENT OF THE GLOBAL CLIMATE COALITION Mr. Chairman, members of the subcommittee: The Global Climate Coalition broad-based organization of business trade associations and companies representing virtually all elements of United States industry, including the energy-producing and energy-consuming sectors. A list of our members is attached.

We believe that it is essential that the climate change issue be framed in the context of industrial competitiveness in a global economic environment. A strong and growing U.S. economy and a robust industrial sector are prerequisites to addressing domestic and international environmental challenges. Ill-considered policy responses to issues such as climate change, especially those that adversely affect the competitiveness of our Nation's industries, would ultimately hamstring our ability to respond to pressing energy and environmental challenges. We are pleased to provide our written statement on the subcommittee's May 26 oversight hearing on global climate change.

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