Numbers: A Population Reduction Proposal

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Universal-Publishers, 2006 - 248 pages
The author proposes that the democratic institution of laws promoting one-child families for 100 years is the only non-violent and fair solution to the economic and ecological problems now squarely facing us. As such the book presents a palatable alternative to the now-suspect 'sustainable development' paradigm, and examines why such a proposal has not been made before. The book ends by assessing the justification for instituting and changing current 'population law', both nationally and internationally.

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Contents

52 No Religious Environmental Covenants Yet
138
53 Is Biblical Ecology Another Question of Interpretation?
143
54 Faith and Habit
150
55 Faith in a Western Social Contract
152
552 As Between Individuals
154
56 Other Formal Covenants
157
57 Conclusion
158
Towards International Population Law
161

24 Reaction to the Limits to Growth Thesis
48
25 The Issue of Scientific Proof
52
The Limits Reappear via Archaeology
58
27 Derivable Growth Policy?
65
28 Conclusion
69
The ʹSustainable Developmentʹ Fix
71
32 Sustainable Development
77
33 Palmerʹs Model for Sustainable Development via Global Governance
80
34 Population Decrease as an Alternative Hypothesis to Sustainable Development
84
35 Conclusion
89
The Individual
91
Selfishness and Opportunism The Need to Acknowledge but Curtail
93
42 Selfishness
94
43 Opportunism
97
431 Definitional Perspective
100
44 Ontological Aspects of Opportunism
103
45 Normative Aspects of Opportunism
106
451 Societal Cost Principle
108
452 Precautionary Principle
111
Analogy to Criminal Behaviour
113
47 WhiteCollar Crime versus WhiteCollar Opportunism
117
Criminal Behaviour
122
481 Classical
123
482 Conservatives
124
483 Nature Nurture
125
484 Strain Theories
126
485 Control Theory
130
49 Conclusion
131
Morality Western Contractarianism and Faith Encourage Growth
135
Is it Legitimate for a Western Government to Control Population?
163
62 Demographic Entrapment
164
63 Legitimacy of Population Controls
167
64 The Contribution to Populations from Immigration
172
65 Reasons for a Government to Restrict Population Levels
173
66 Reasons for Leaders to Move Quickly
178
662 Malthus and the Tragedy of the Common Principle
181
67 Legitimacy of Population Control
183
Reproducing Once is the Moral Minimum Not the Right to Reproduce Per Se
184
69 Legitimacy of Control of Immigration
190
692 Is Immigration a Moral Minimum Issue? Is Territory a Fundamental Basic Need?
192
610 Legislating Legitimately
194
612 Conclusion
195
Legal Mechanisms for Stable Reductions in Population Birth Immigration
199
72 International Population Law Buried not Resolved
201
73 Requirements for an International Population Law
204
733 Logistics
206
734 Legal Norms may Derive from Existing National Laws
208
74 Conclusion
212
Economics and International Governance during Population Decrease
215
82 Sovereignty
217
83 Multinational Enterprises BrettonWoods Instruments and Globalization
218
WTO Attempt to Impose Trade on States via GATT
221
85 SelfDetermination
223
86 Conclusion
224
Conclusion
227
World III Data
231
Selected Bibliography
237
Copyright

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Page 221 - In order to protect the environment, the precautionary approach shall be widely applied by States according to their capabilities. Where there are threats of serious or irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty shall not be used as a reason for postponing cost-effective measures to prevent environmental degradation.
Page 48 - It is possible to alter these growth trends and to establish a condition of ecological and economic stability that is sustainable far into the future. The state of global equilibrium could be designed so that the basic material needs of each person on earth are satisfied and each person has an equal opportunity to realize his individual human potential.
Page 47 - If the present growth trends in world population, industrialization, pollution, food production, and resource depletion continue unchanged, the limits to growth on this planet will be reached sometime within the next one hundred years. The most probable result will be a rather sudden and uncontrollable decline in both population and industrial capacity.
Page 157 - Nothing in the present Covenant shall be interpreted as impairing the inherent right of all peoples to enjoy and utilize fully and freely their natural wealth and resources.
Page 119 - This concept is not intended to be definitive, but merely to call attention to crimes which are not ordinarily included within the scope of criminology. White collar crime may be defined approximately as a crime committed by a person of respectability and high social status in the course of his occupation.
Page 157 - All peoples may, for their own ends, freely dispose of their natural wealth and resources without prejudice to any obligations arising out of international economic cooperation, based upon the principle of mutual benefit, and international law. In no case may a people be deprived of its own means of subsistence.
Page 168 - ... rationalizations"; rather, it is to say that they have an element of rationalization in them. Theory, then, by making power legitimate, turns it into authority. All theories of legitimacy take the form of establishing a principle which, while it resides outside power and is independent of it, locates or embeds power in a realm of things beyond the wills of the holders of power: the legitimacy of power stems from its origin. In addition, most theories of legitimacy simultaneously attempt to justify...
Page 150 - We would seem to be headed toward conclusions unpalatable to many Christians. Since both science and technology are blessed words in our contemporary vocabulary, some may be happy at the notions, first, that, viewed historically, modern science is an extrapolation of natural theology and, second, that modern technology is at least partly to be explained as an Occidental, voluntarist realization of the Christian dogma of man's transcendence of, and rightful mastery over, nature.

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