9/11: Mental Health in the Wake of Terrorist Attacks

Front Cover
Yuval Neria, Raz Gross, Randall D. Marshall, Ezra S. Susser
Cambridge University Press, 2006 M09 14
Does terrorism have a unique and significant emotional and behavioral impact among adults and children? In what way does the impact of terrorism exceed the individual level and affect communities and specific professional groups, and test different leadership styles? How were professional communities of mental health clinicians, policy-makers and researchers mobilized to respond to the emerging needs post disaster? What are the lessons learned from the work conducted after 9/11, and the implications for future disaster mental health work and preparedness efforts? Yuval Neria and his team are uniquely placed to answer these questions having been involved in modifying ongoing trials and setting up new ones in New York to address these issues straight after the attacks. No psychiatrist, mental health professional or policy-maker should be without this book.

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
17
Section 3
19
Section 4
45
Section 5
71
Section 6
95
Section 7
114
Section 8
128
Section 20
297
Section 21
311
Section 22
333
Section 23
355
Section 24
378
Section 25
402
Section 26
427
Section 27
446

Section 9
141
Section 10
157
Section 11
164
Section 12
178
Section 13
197
Section 14
215
Section 15
231
Section 16
239
Section 17
256
Section 18
264
Section 19
282
Section 28
457
Section 29
475
Section 30
496
Section 31
521
Section 32
529
Section 33
543
Section 34
570
Section 35
592
Section 36
605
Section 37
617

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Page 296 - I really believe that the pagans, and the abortionists, and the feminists, and the gays and lesbians who are actively trying to make that an alternative lifestyle, the ACLU, People For the American Way, all of them who have tried lo seculari/e America.
Page 46 - American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder A. The person has been exposed to a traumatic event in which both of the following were present: (1) The person experienced, witnessed, or was confronted with an event or events that involved actual or threatened death or serious injury, or a threat to the physical integrity of self or others. (2) The person's response involved intense fear, helplessness, or horror.
Page 212 - ... between. It is time for me to hurry to work too, and I exchange my ritual farewell with Mr. Lofaro, the short, thick-bodied, white-aproned fruit man who stands outside his doorway a little up the street, his arms folded, his feet planted, looking solid as earth itself. We nod; we each glance quickly up and down the street, then look back to each other and smile. We have done this many a morning for more than ten years, and we both know what it means: All is well.

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