Policy Coherence for Development in the EU Council: Strategies for the Way Forward

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CEPS, 2006 - 202 pages
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Recognizing that its policies in nondevelopment areas (such as trade, energy, and migration) can profoundly affect the poor in developing countries, the EU has established the principle of "policy coherence for development" to achieve more effective development cooperation.This study analyzes whether EU Council policymaking processes provide sufficient scope for development inputs in key areas including trade, environment, climate change, security, agriculture, fisheries, social dimension of globalization, employment and decent work, migration, research and innovation, information society, transportation, and energy.The authors also review the commission's processes as it initiates and defends most of the policies being discussed in the EU Council. The book's findings highlight the segregated character of EU policymaking and provide insights into the challenges the EU will need to address in its organizational structure.Contributors include Sergio Carrera, Meng-Hsuan Chou, David Kernohan, Andreas Schneider, Lorna Schrefler, and Marius Vahl, all from CEPS.

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Contents

PARTI MAIN REPORT
1
Analysing EU PolicyMaking and PCD in 12 Policy Areas
8
Drivers for Change
34
Fiche on EU Trade Policy
51
Economic Partnership Agreements 62 2 Fiche on EU Environment Policy
67
Case Study on Climate Change in the Context of Development Cooperation 87 4 Fiche on EU Security Policy
91
Fiche on EU Agricultural Policy
104
Fiche on EU Fisheries Policy
118
Fiche on EU Migration Policy
137
Fiche on EU Research Policy
152
Fiche on EU Transport Policy
170
REFERENCES AND FURTHER READING
187
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About the author (2006)

Christian Egenhofer is a senior research fellow at CEPS. Louise van Schaik is a research fellow in the European Studies Programme at Clingendael. Michael Kaeding is with Leiden University and a CEPS associate research fellow. Alan Hudson is with the Overseas Development Institute. Jorge Nez Ferrer is a CEPS research fellow.

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