Hearings

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1947
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Morrill Dr J L president University of Minnesota Minneapolis Minn
32
Kilgore Hon Harley M United States Senator from the State of West
37
McManus Rev William E assistant director Department of Education
45
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF WITNESSES
47
New York N Y 260
91
Stirling Harold V Assistant Administrator for Vocational Rehabilitation
103
C
111
Friley Charles E president Iowa State College Ames Iowa statement
116
Dr George F Zook president American Council on Education
125
York City N Y
137
Ashe David I legislative chairman United Parents Associations of
152
Petegorsky Dr David W executive director American Jewish Congress
156
New York N Y
183
Woll Matthew chairman American Federation of Labor Committee
188
Irvin R Kuenzli secretarytreasurer American Federation of Teach
196
Monday April 28 1947Continued Page
346
Brown Edgar G representative of the National Negro Council Washing
348
Mrs Joseph Willen chairman National Committee on Education
352
Saunders William E V High School Teachers Association of New York
386
Cooper Hon John Sherman United States Senator from the State of Ken
388
of America Inc New York N Y
396
James J Rudisill chairman education committee Printing Industry
402
Dawson Dr J M executive secretary the Joint Conference Committee
405
Mrs Rena Mannex OBrien Los Angeles Calif
412
Charles E Babcock chairman National Legislative Committee
422
Foreman Clark president Southern Conference for Human Welfare
466
Fulbright Hon J William United States Senator from the State
475
Smith Hon H Alexander United States Senator from the State of
555
Associations New York City letter of
561
Hamilton James T Federal legislative chairman Oregon Education
569
Munson Cecil head vocational training and education the American
53
Tead Dr Ordway appearing for Hon William ODwyer mayor
79
Grubbs Mrs Ethel Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Washington D C 455
87
Harriman Mrs Flora teacher and principal Hampden Maine 82
96
and statement of in re S 971 106
106
Zook Dr George F president American Council on Education Wash
111
Heming Mrs Charles E director of the League of Women Voters of
291
Van Leer Dr Blake R president Georgia School of Technology Atlanta
1
Hill Hon Lister United States Senator from the State of Alabama 2
2
George H Field Commissioner Bureau of Community Facilities Federal
13
Dr J L Morrill president University of Minnesota Minneapolis Minn 32
32
Dr Ernest V Hollis Chief Veterans Facilities Program Higher Education
43
Dr Blake R Van Leer president Georgia School of Technology Atlanta
68
Jackson E Hilton attorney at law Washington D C 427
76
Tuesday May 6 1947
78
Keenn Thomas B legislative secretarv Council for Social Action Congre
91
Jesse P Bogue executive secretary American Association of Junior
95
Ketchum Omar B director Veterans of Foreign Wars Kansas City Mo
105
Dr Garth H Akridge president Jacksonville Junior College Jacksonville
108
Paterson Chat legislative representative American Veterans Committee
114
Page
22
22
statement of in re S 199 30
30
Thomas Kennedy Baltimore Md
31
Page
32
Charles W Stevens assistant national rehabilitation director
44
Wheeler Hon W M a Representative in Congress from the State
2
Cecil Munson head vocational training and education the American
19
Tuesday June 10 1947
25
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 269 - No tax in any amount, large or small, can be levied to support any religious activities or institutions, whatever they may be called, or whatever form they may adopt to teach or practice religion.
Page 305 - The fundamental theory of liberty upon which all governments in this Union repose excludes any general power of the State to standardize its children by forcing them to accept instruction from public teachers only. The child is not the mere creature of the State; those who nurture him and direct his destiny have the right, coupled with the high duty, to recognize and prepare him for additional obligations.
Page 427 - Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press ; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.
Page 289 - I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves ; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by education.
Page 381 - Promote, then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.
Page 294 - The First Amendment has erected a wall between church and state. That wall must be kept high and impregnable. We could not approve the slightest breach.
Page 166 - ... thus building a wall of separation between Church and State.
Page 308 - Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity, in exclusion of all other Religions, may establish with the same ease any particular sect of Christians, in exclusion of all other Sects? That the same authority which can force a citizen to contribute three pence only of his property for the support of any one establishment, may force him to conform to any other establishment in all cases whatsoever ? 4.
Page 285 - establishment of religion" clause of the First Amendment means at least this: Neither a state nor the Federal Government can set up a church. Neither can pass laws which aid one religion, aid all religions, or prefer one religion over another. Neither can force nor influence a person to go to or...
Page 481 - Because it is proper to take alarm at the first experiment on our liberties. We hold this prudent jealousy to be the first duty of citizens, and one of [the] noblest characteristics of the late Revolution. The freemen of America did not wait till usurped power had strengthened itself by exercise and entangled the question in precedents.

Bibliographic information