Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other

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ReadHowYouWant.com, Jan 15, 2011 - Human-computer interaction - 680 pages
15 Reviews
Consider Facebook - it's human contact, only easier to engage with and easier to avoid. Developing technology promises closeness. Sometimes it delivers, but much of our modern life leaves us less connected with people and more connected to simulations of them. In Alone Together, MIT technology and society professor Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. It's a nuanced exploration of what we are looking for - and sacrificing - in a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of today's self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ecataldi - LibraryThing

An exceptionally well researched book that explore technology and the unintended effects it's having on how we interact with others and ourselves. Broken into two parts, the first half explores the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - porch_reader - LibraryThing

I'm going to write an article about how digital natives (young people who have always had technology playing a major role in their lives) approach work, so I've been reading a lot about how people ... Read full review

Contents

ALSO BY SHERRY TURKLE
i
alone together
xx
The Robotic Moment
1
Networked
221
necessary conversations
445
the Front Cover Back Cover Back Cover
458
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About the author (2011)

Sherry Turkle is Abby Rockefeller Mauz? Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology at MIT and Founder and Director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self. A psychoanalytically trained sociologist and psychologist, she is the author of "The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit" (Twentieth Anniversary Edition, MIT Press), "Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet, " and "Psychoanalytic Politics: Jacques Lacan and Freud's French Revolution." She is the editor of "Evocative Objects: Things We Think With, Falling for Science: Objects in Mind, " and "The Inner History of Devices, " all three published by the MIT Press.

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