U.S. Government Policies and Programs to Combat Terrorism: Hearing Before the Committee on Armed Services, United States Senate, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session, March 9, 1999

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 2000 - 49 pages

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Page 16 - defensive measures used to reduce the vulnerability of individuals and property to terrorism.
Page 16 - Kenya reminded us that terrorists can strike anywhere, at any time. During my testimony last year, I noted that our adversaries, unable to confront or compete with the United States militarily, spend millions of dollars each year to finance terrorist organizations that target US citizens, property and interests. Consequently, our Combatant Commanders and the Services continue to focus on force protection issues as a first order priority.
Page 47 - DoJ will honor the commitment to train the remainder of the designated 120 cities. During the fiscal year 2000 transition period, DoJ will coordinate with DoD in the city training-planning phases and will begin to provide grant funding for training equipment. The transition will occur in stages to accommodate existing budgets and program...
Page 47 - DoJ will coordinate with DoD in joint planning efforts so that the state and local responder communities will continue to benefit from the expert assistance functions. DoD will enhance its domestic chem/bip response capabilities through the CB-RRT by continuing to train, exercise, and maintain this team. Checks and balances are built into the staged approach to the transition. DoJ will coordinate with DoD throughout fiscal year 2000 and participate in joint planning as articulated in the finalized...
Page 47 - ... agencies will contribute funding to benefit from the lessons learned from the improved response program of the DPP beginning in fiscal year 2001. Joint planning will be conducted through the Multi-Agency Task Force to coordinate both the improvements of state and local response capabilities and DoD's efforts to enhance its response elements. Beginning in fiscal year 2001, DoJ will assume funding and programmatic responsibility for the Hotline, Helpline and Internet web site, but DoD will retain...
Page 47 - ... 2001 will be to continue to enhance the readiness of its WMD response units and installation responders. DoJ will focus on the response at the local and state levels. As a result, both agencies will contribute funding to benefit from the lessons learned from the improved response program of the DPP beginning in fiscal year 2001.
Page 7 - The enemies of peace realize they cannot defeat us with traditional military means. So they are working on two new forms of assault: cyber attacks on our critical computer systems, and attacks with weapons of mass destruction - chemical, biological, potentially even nuclear weapons. We must be ready ready if our adversaries try to use computers to disable power grids, banking, communications and...
Page 18 - Forces specific responsibilities in support of the broader interagency task of preventing the proliferation of WMD. Today, Counterproliferation (CP) has been given top operational priority at USSOCOM. Counterproliferation includes actions taken to locate, identify, seize, destroy, render safe, or transport WMD. USSOCOM is responsible for organizing, training, and equipping forces to disable or destroy NBC weapons and their means of delivery, taking into account the need to mitigate collateral effects....
Page 46 - Clarke) and the Department of Defense met to discuss how these agencies could best work together to combat domestic terrorism. It was agreed in principle that the Department of Justice (DoJ) should assume leadership for implementing the nation's domestic preparedness program. This agreement would have the added benefit of placing responsibility for federally supported WMD training and equipping in one location, as part of the "one-stop" shop consistently requested by first responders.
Page 8 - ... underscored the need for greater appreciation of the complexities and interdependencies created by the growth of information systems. More and more, these critical systems are driven by, and linked together with, computers, making them more vulnerable to disruption. Last spring, we saw the enormous impact a single failed electronic link, when a satellite malfunctioned — disabled pagers, ATMs, credit card systems and television networks all around the world. We already are seeing the first wave...

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