Page images
PDF
EPUB

When placed under improvement, in 1880, this portion of the Yadkin River had its navigation completely obstructed by rock ledges, fish, and mill-dams, and numerous shoals, with a greatest depth of 1 foot at ordinary low water on some of its shoals and ledges.

The original project of 1879 proposed to secure a 2.5 to 3 foot steamboat navigation during the entire year over the 64 miles above the Salisbury Railroad Bridge.

Modified project of 1887 proposed to limit this improvement to obtain. ing this depth only during winter stages of water and only over the lower 33 miles of river, at a total cost of $107,000.

Up to June 30, 1890, a total of $96,450. 48, including outstanding liabilities, had been spent in all upon this improvement in securing a channel of 40 to 70 feet channel width, and from 2 to 2 feet channel depth during mean winter stages of water (8 months of the year) from the Salisbury Railroad Bridge 33 miles upward to Bailey Ferry.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, an additional $2,721.06, including outstanding liabilities, was spent in removing rock and sand from the channel, in building rock jetties, and in minor work. All work in the field was suspended during winter, on account of cold weather, high water, and the small amount of funds.

The improvement, once thoroughly completed, should be comparatively permanent.

July 1, 1890, balance unexpended..

- Proceeds of sale

Amount appropriated by act approved September 19, 1890..

June 30, 1891, amount expended during fiscal y year

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

July 1, 1891, outstanding liabilities.

July 1, 1891, balance available......

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1893
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867,

(See Appendix L 21.)

$722.52

200.00 5,000.00

5,922.52 2, 462.32

3,460.20 431.74

3,028.46

5,000,00 5,000.00

22. Harbor at Georgetown, South Carolina.-When placed under improvement, in 1880, this harbor had an excellent and well-protected anchorage of at least 1 mile in length, 150 feet width, and 15 feet depth. A bar of about 2,850 feet in length and with only 9 feet depth of water was the only obstacle to an otherwise good 13-foot navigation from Georgetown 13 miles to the ocean.

The original project of 1881, as continued to date, proposed to secure a dredged channel of 200 feet bottom width and 12 feet low-water depth entirely through the bar. The total final cost of this work was estimated in 1889 at $44,500.

Up to June 30, 1890, a total of $23,877.57, including outstanding liabilities, had been spent, in all, upon this improvement, giving a through cut entirely across the bar, with 12 feet low-water depth, and with a variable width of from 80 to 100 feet.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, an additional $58.16, including outstanding liabilities, was spent on this improvement in office and minor work.

The channel once thoroughly opened will probably be permanent.

July 1, 1890, balance unexpended............

Amount appropriated by act approved September 19, 1890..

June 30, 1891, amount expended during fiscal year....

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

July 1, 1891, amount covered by uncompleted contracts..

$622.43 8,000.00

8, 622.43 58. 16

8, 564.27 7,000.00

July 1, 1891, balance available

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30,1893
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix L 22.)

1,564.27

12, 000, 00 12,000.00

23. Winyaw Bay, South Carolina.-When placed under improvement in 1886 this bay had only 9 feet least depth upon its bar entrance, with a 12-foot channel the rest of the way to Georgetown.

The original project of 1885 proposed to secure a permanent bar entrance from 15 to 20 feet depth of water.

The total final cost of this work was estimated in 1885 at $2,500,000 for a bar depth of from 15 to 20 feet (the first $800,000 to secure a depth of about 12 feet) at low water.

Up to June 30, 1890, a total of $20,027.45, including outstanding liabilities, had been spent upon this improvement in making necessary preparations for beginning work, and in building the shore end of the jetty.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, an additional $12,809.43, including outstanding liabilities, was spent on this work in building the shore end of the proposed jetty.

The channel, once thoroughly opened, will probably retain its depth permanently.

July 1, 1890, balance unexpended

Amount appropriated by act approved September 19, 1890

[blocks in formation]

July 1, 1891, amount covered by uncompleted contracts.

[blocks in formation]

July 1, 1891, balance available

13, 871.33

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... 2, 281, 250.00 Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1893..

Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix L 23.)

300,000.00

24. Removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering naviga tion. The wreck of an old schooner opposite Swan Point, Pamlico River, North Carolina, was reported in March, 1891, as obstructing and endangering navigation. Authority was given for its removal by hired labor, by the Government snagging plant on its next passage over the river, at an expense not exceeding $150. No work was actually done, however, prior to 30th June, 1891.

(See Appendix L 24.)

[graphic]

EXAMINATIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT, TO COMPLY WITH REQUIREMENTS OF RIVER AND HARBOR ACT APPROVED SEPTEMBER 19, 1890.

The required preliminary examinations of the following localities were made by the local engineer in charge, Captain Bixby, and reports thereon submitted through Col. Wm. P. Craighill, Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer, Southeast Division. It is the opinion of Captain Bixby, and of the Division Engineer, based upon the facts and reasons given, that these localities are not worthy of improvement. The conclusions of these officers being concurred in by me, no further surveys of these localities were ordered. The reports were transmitted to Congress and printed as executive documents of the Fifty-first Congress, second session.

1. Water-way from Pungo River to the town of Sladesville, North Carolina.-Printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 160. (See also Appendix L 25.) 2. Water-way between Pamlico River and Bay River, North Carolina.Printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 162. (See also Appendix L 26.)

3. Drum Inlet, North Carolina.-Printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 164. (See also Appendix L 27.)

The required preliminary examinations of the following localities were made by the local engineer in charge, Captain Bixby, and reports thereon submitted through Col. Wm. P. Craighill, Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer, Southeast Division. It is the opinion of Captain Bixby, and of the Division Engineer, based upon the facts and reasons given, that these localities are worthy of improvement. The reports of the preliminary examinations containing sufficient information to indi cate to Congress the probable cost of the work required, no further surveys appear to be necessary at this time. The reports were transmitted to Congress and printed as executive documents of the Fiftyfirst Congress, second session.

1. Harbor of Washington, Pamlico River, North Carolina.-The proposed improvement contemplates dredging a channel 200 feet wide and 9 feet deep at ordinary low water, at an estimated cost of $45,000. Printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 289. (See also Appendix L 28.)

2. White Oak River, North Carolina, from Roberts' Landing to Collins Crossing.-The work proposed consists in providing for steamboat navigation from Robert's Landing to Sabiston's Bridge, 4 miles, and for flat-boat navigation from Sabiston's Bridge to Collins Crossing, 21 miles, at an estimated cost of $4,550. Printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 97. (See also Appendix L 29.)

3. Black River, South Carolina, from Kingstree to its mouth.-The proposed improvement contemplates the removal of such obstructions as snags and fallen and overhanging trees, from its mouth upward 118 miles to the railroad bridge at Kingstree, at an estimated cost of $25,000. Printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 286. (See also Appendix L 30.)

IMPROVEMENT OF LUMBER AND WACCAMAW RIVERS, NORTH CAROLINA AND SOUTH CAROLINA, AND OF CERTAIN RIVERS AND HARBORS IN SOUTH CAROLINA.

Officer in charge, Capt. Frederic V. Abbot, Corps of Engineers, with Lieut. E. J. Spencer, Corps of Engineers, under his immediate orders to August 12, 1890; Division Engineer, Col. Wm. P. Craighill, Corps of Engineers.

1. Waccamaw River to Waccamaw Lake, North Carolina and South Carolina.-In 1880 this river was navigable for 12-foot draft boats at all stages of water from Georgetown, 23 miles to Bull Creek, and at high

[graphic]

water 4 miles farther to Buck's lower mills; thence for 7-foot draft boats at high water, 22 miles farther to Conway; thence it possessed an obstructed channel for 3-foot draft boats at ordinary winter water, 70 miles to Reeves Ferry, the present head of steam navigation; thence au obstructed channel with 3 feet depth at high water, 30 miles to Lake Waccamaw. The commerce of this river is estimated to have been about $400,000 per year. The project provides for a channel 12 feet deep at all stages of water, and 80 feet bottom width from the mouth of the river to Conway; thence a cleared channel to Lake Waccamaw. During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, a large amount of snagging has been done. Much good has resulted. Up to June 30, 1891, $73,700.46 has been spent on this river, giving a thoroughly cleared channel with 100 feet least width, 7 feet deep at low water as far as Conway, and 40 feet width and 3 feet depth 72 miles above Conway.

July 1, 1890, balance unexpended......
Amount appropriated by act approved September 19, 1890

June 30, 1891, amount expended during fiscal year..

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

July 1, 1891, outstanding liabilities.

July 1, 1891, balance available.....

(Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project... Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1993 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections of river and harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix M 1.)

July 1, 1890, balance unexpended....

Amount appropriated by act approved September 19, 1890.

2. Lumber River, North Carolina and South Carolina.-The river is obstructed by logs, snags, stumps, overhanging trees, and in places by sand bars. It is crossed by a number of bridges without draws. Its present commerce is small.

The project contemplates the removal of snags, logs, overhanging trees, etc., on 70 miles below Lumberton, at an estimated cost of $35,000. During the year a large amount of snagging has been done on the river, and several of the bridges have been provided with draw spans or have been discontinued. The amount expended up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, is $5,613.06.

June 30, 1891, amount expended during fiscal year

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

July 1, 1891, outstanding liabilities..

July 1, 1891, balance available

(Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project... 25,000.00 Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30,1893 20,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix M 2.)

3. Little Pedee River, South Carolina.-This river was much obstructed by snags and overhanging trees, and in places was subdivided

into several branches. The project provides for removing obstructions and closing unnecessary branches. Steamboat navigation is provided for to Lumber River and pole-boat navigation to Little Rock. The estimated cost is $50,000. The work of the year has been snagging. The commerce amounts to about $52,000.

The total expenditures to June 30, 1891, were $7,138.41.

July 1, 1890, balance unexpended

Amount appropriated by act approved September 19, 1890

June 30, 1891, amount expended during fiscal year....

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

July 1, 1891, outstanding liabilities.

July 1, 1891, balance available

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1893
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix M 3.)

$417.22 5,000.00

5, 417.22 2,555.63

2,861.59

279.32

2,582. 27

40,000.00

20,000.00

4. Great Pedee River, South Carolina.-This river was dangerously obstructed by snags and logs. The project provides for thoroughly cleared 9-foot navigation to Smith's Mills, and a 34-foot navigation to Cheraw, 172 miles above the mouth, at all stages of water. At ordinary stages there is a well-cleared 9-foot channel to Smith's Mills, and a thoroughly cleared 34-foot channel at low water 50 miles farther, or at high water to Cheraw. During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, large amount of snagging has been done. Substantial improvement has resulted.

The total expenditures up to June 30, 1891, were $70,039.02. July 1, 1890, balance unexpended................

Amount appropriated by act approved September 19, 1890..

[blocks in formation]

a

$3, 158. 21 12,500.00

15, 658. 21 6, 197.23

9,460.98 466.67

8,994. 31

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1893
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

(See Appendix M 4.)

37,500.00 30, 000. 00

5. Clark River, South Carolina.-This river forms the southern mouth of Lynch's River. Its upper end was entirely choked by driftwood and fallen trees. The project provides for closing the northern mouth of Lynch's River and snagging Clark River. The estimated cost is $7,500. The river and harbor act of September 19, 1890, appropriated $2,500 for this river, it being the second appropriation.

No work has been done, as the funds available were small and the water has been too high for cheap work.

« PreviousContinue »