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Dr. HARDY. Just beginning. This treatment, as we presently know it now in clinical terms, with the tools that are available and what information is coming through from basic and clinical research jobs, is not as old as the last year of World War II. It is moving very freshly, very fast.

Mr. HESELTON. Proceed, Doctor.

Dr. HARDY. Does anybody else in the group wish to add to this general question of research?

I think we may summarize at this point, Mr. Chairman, unless there are other questions from the committee.

Mr. HESELTON. Are there any further questions?
Mr. THORNBERRY. Off the record.
(Discussion off the record.)

Dr. Hardy. I believe the picture can be summarized fairly directly. I think we tried to cover at least the high spots of the general field.

There is an ongoing, slowly developing program designed to find cases at least of certain ranges of children's problems, now centered under the public health or school health auspices in most States. That program has not gone very far.

As Dr. Glorig suggested, in his opinion perhaps 1 out of 5 children who have these problems are known by case-finding techniques and actually are being followed through. The necessary indicated steps in diagnosis and therapy are shown. A good deal more needs to be done.

That is one need in the field for professional personnel trained in modern terms to move into those programs and organize them better from the community level on up. That probably will not happen until and unless there is much further development in public education in these specific terms and needs.

I think it is worth while restressing over and over that the preventive aspects of this question of hearing disorders are by all means the most important. When one deals in the field of prevention, he is dealing not with the 100,000 or 200,000, but with potential millions, and the figure gets there very rapidly, across the period of one decade. It stands to reason, I think, from any approach, that prevention of disease and of the effects of disease must be No. 1 on anybody's roster or agenda of things to be done.

The next step is in the field of restoration of impairment. A good deal of work is going on, but the surface is barely being scratched largely because of some implications of what Dr. Bailey and Dr. Stone have been discussing. There is a great dearth of knowledge and information of basic physiology, basic function and disfunction. That kind of research must center in adequately equipped institutions.

There there is a third aspect of the field, which includes the broad range of rehabilitation in the widest sense. As I would define that now, I should assume that that also includes all known and knowable steps of education or special training. At the level that Dr. Elstad addressed himself to for the deaf people, but also at the level which is being addressed by every State organization of vocational rehabilitation that is necessary, to find the best aptitudes and see to it that the individual is helped by whatever means society can provide, to achieve accomplishment in those aptitudes.

You have three aspects : Prevention, restoration, and education and rehabilitation. They all need a vast amount more help, understanding, and information at every level.

Personally I believe that the No. 1 requirement is people trained and interested and willing to go on to work, and then funding for the particular jobs of inquiry that those people are able to address themselves to.

Mr. HESELTON. That completes your testimony?
Mr. Hardy. Unless the panel has something more to say.

Mr. HESELTON. I cannot resist repeating that in the course of this hearing it seems to me that there are at least two points as to which something can be done and rather quickly. One is that I hope the Appropriations Committee is going

to know a good deal more about the work you are doing, Doctor. Certainly that is a very practical and very profitable way of attacking a certain part of this problem, it seems to me.

Next is in connection with the fact that I suppose almost all births today are attended by physicians. It seems to me it ought to be possible to see to it that in the general medical schools the problem which you have outlined to us is made very clear to all practicing physicians today and to obtain their cooperation. It would seem to me that would be an invaluable asset to the work you would like to do with the young children.

In any event, I am sure this hearing has brought to this committee a great deal of very valuable information, and I dare say that many of my colleagues, like myself, have learned it for the first time, rather well along in life. I can assure you that the committee does appreciate the care with which all of this has been prepared. We realize you have had to come here at some inconvenience, but we feel confident that each of you may look forward to something this committee may be able to do in this field which will reward you for coming here this morning

The committee will stand adjourned until Monday at 10 o'clock.

(Thereupon, at 1:08 p. m., Friday, October 9, 1953, an adjournment was taken.)

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(VOLUNTARY HEALTH INSURANCE)

HEARINGS

BEFORE THE

COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

EIGHTY-THIRD CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION

ON

THE CAUSES, CONTROL, AND REMEDIES OF THE

PRINCIPAL DISEASES OF MANKIND

PART 5

OCTOBER 13 AND 14, 1953

Printed for the use of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce

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COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE

CHARLES A. WOLVERTON, New Jersey, Chairman CARL HINSHAW, California

ROBERT CROSSER, Ohio JOSEPH P. O'HARA, Minnesota

J. PERCY PRIEST, Tennessee ROBERT HALE, Maine

OREN HARRIS, Arkansas JAMES I. DOLLIVER, Iowa

DWIGHT L, ROGERS, Florida JOHN W. HESELTON, Massachusetts ARTHUR G. KLEIN, New York JOHN B. BENNETT, Michigan

WILLIAM T. GRANAHAN, Pennsylvania RICHARD W. HOFFMAN, Illinois

F. ERTEL CARLYLE, North Carolina JOHN V. BEAMER, Indiana

JOHN BELL WILLIAMS, Mississippi WILLIAM L. SPRINGER, Illinois

PETER F. MACK, JR., Illinois ALVIN R. BUSH, Pennsylvania

HOMER THORNBERRY, Texas PAL'L F. SCHENCK, Ohio

LOUIS B. HELLER, New York JOSEPH L, CARRIGG, Pennsylvania

KENNETH A. ROBERTS, Alabama HERBERT B. WARBURTON, Delaware MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri STEVEN B. DEROUNIAN, New York

HARLEY 0. STAGGERS, West Virginia
THOMAS M. PELLY, Washington
J. ARTHUR YOUNGER, California

ELTON J. LAYTON, Clerk
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Statement of

Barrett, George K., assistant personnel manager, Ohio Oil Co., Find

lay, Ohio.
Beers, Henry S., vice president, Aetna Life Insurance Co.
Cristy, James C., insurance manager, Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, Mich.
Faulkner, Edwin J., president, Woodmen Central Life, Woodmen

Accident, and Woodmen Central Assurance Co., Lincoln, Nebr..
Hill, Charles G., group secretary, Massachusetts Mutual Life Insur-

ance Co., Springfield, Mass..
Thoré, Eugene M., general counsel, Life Insurance Association of

America
Whittaker, Edmund B., vice president, Prudential Insurance Co. of

America
Wilson, Alphonse M., assistant manager, accident and health depart-

ment, Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. of Boston..

Wilson, Frazier S., insurance manager, United Air Lines. Additional information submitted for the record by

American Life Convention, letter from Robert L. Hogg, executive vice

president and general counsel.. Health and Accident Underwriters Conference, letter from John P.

Hanna, managing director, transmitting inemorandum re Reader's

Digest article...
Health Insurance Council, annual survey, accident and health cover-

age in the United States, December 31, 1952. Life Insurance Association of America:

Letter from Eugene M. Thoré, general counsel..
Members of the Life Insurance Medical Research Fund, annual

report, 1952-53.

Report of the board of directors. Prudential Insurance Co. of America:

At no cost to you-polio expense benefits for you and your de

pendents...
Estimated number of persons covered by major medical insur-

ance as of October 1 1953, table---
Now-for you-group major medical expense insurance-a plan

of protection to help meet the high cost of serious sicknesses

and accidents.
Something new for us--improved disability and hospital, surgical,

and medical expense benefit plans...
Socony-Vacuum Oil Co., Inc., letter from William H. Montgomery,

manager, industrial relations, transmitting hospital-surgical insur-
ance plan...
United Air Lines, Inc., your insurance as an employee.
Upjohn Co., employee insurance program,
Wolverton, 'Hon. Charles A.: Health and Accident Insurance Poli-

cies—How Much Can You Rely On Thern? by John Alan Apple-
man, from Reader's Digest, September 1953.

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