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national interest, as defined in the Old Georgetown Act of 1950 (64 Stat. 903). In particular, the Commission is involved in developing architectural designs that complement Washington's historic structures and districts. Washington's building height limits and the preservation of its broad, tree-lined avenues and riverscapes are continuing concerns of the Commission. The quality of design applies to the Mall and

monumental city, as well as to the diverse neighborhoods throughout the city.

In brief, the Commission's duties and functions include the aesthetic review of the public works in the Nation's Capital; design and material for monuments, memorials, and certain designated buildings; land to be acquired for park purposes in the District of Columbia; and building applications in the Old Georgetown and Shipstead-Luce areas.

For further information, contact the Secretary and Administrative Officer, Commission of Fine Arts, 708 Jackson Place NW., Washington, DC 20006. Phone, 202–566-1066.

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[For the Commodity Futures Trading Commission statement of organization, see the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 17, Part 140]

The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), the Federal regulatory agency for futures trading, was established by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission Act of 1974 (7 U.S.C. 4a). The Commission began operation in April 1975, and its authority to regulate futures trading was renewed by Congress in 1978, 1982, and 1986. CFTC consists of five Commissioners who are appointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. One Commissioner is designated by the President to serve as Chairman. The Commissioners serve staggered 5year terms, and by law no more than three Commissioners can belong to the same political party.

Activities

The Commission consists of five major operating components: the divisions of enforcement, economic analysis, trading and markets, and the offices of the executive director and the general counsel.

The Commission regulates trading on the 11 U.S. futures exchanges, which offer active futures and options contracts. It also regulates the activities of numerous commodity exchange members, public brokerage houses (futures commission merchants), Commission-registered futures industry salespeople and associated persons, commodity trading advisers, and commodity pool operators. Some offexchange transactions involving

instruments similar in nature to futures contracts also fall under CFTC jurisdiction.

The Commission's regulatory and enforcement efforts are designed to ensure that the futures trading process is fair and that it protects both the rights of customers and the financial integrity of the marketplace. CFTC approves the rules under which an exchange proposes to operate and monitors exchange enforcement of those rules. It reviews the terms of proposed futures contracts, and registers companies and individuals who handle customer funds or give trading advice. The Commission also protects the public by enforcing rules that require that customer funds be kept in bank accounts separate from accounts maintained by firms for their own use, and that such customer accounts be

marked to present market value at the close of trading each day.

Futures contracts for agricultural commodities were traded in the United States for more than 100 years before futures trading was diversified to include trading in contracts for precious metals, raw materials, foreign currencies, commercial interest rates, and U.S. Government and mortgage securities. Contract diversification has grown in exchange trading volume, a growth not limited to the newer commodities.

CFTC maintains large regional offices in Chicago and New York, cities in which many of the Nation's futures exchanges are located. Smaller regional offices are located in Kansas City and Los Angeles, and there is a suboffice of the Kansas City regional office in Minneapolis.

For further information, contact the Office of Communication and Education Services, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, 2033 K Street NW., Washington, DC 20581. Phone, 202–2548630.

CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION

5401 Westbard Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20207

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[For the Consumer Product Safety Commission statement of organization, see the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 16, Part 1000]

The purpose of the Consumer Product Safety Commission is to protect the public against unreasonable risks of injury from consumer products; to assist consumers to evaluate the comparative safety of consumer products; to develop uniform safety standards for consumer products and minimize conflicting State and local regulations; and to promote research and investigation into the causes and prevention of product-related deaths, illnesses, and injuries.

The Consumer Product Safety
Commission (CPSC) is an independent
Federal regulatory agency established by
the Consumer Product Safety Act (15
U.S.C. 2051).

In addition to the authority created by the Consumer Product Safety Act, the Commission has responsibility for implementing provisions of the Flammable Fabrics Act (15 U.S.C. 1191), the Poison Prevention Packaging Act of 1970 (15 U.S.C. 1471), the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (15 U.S.C. 1261), and the act of August 2, 1956 (15 U.S.C. 1211), which prohibits the transportation of refrigerators without door safety devices.

Activities

To help protect the public from unreasonable risks of injury associated with consumer products, the Commission:

-requires manufacturers to report defects in products that could create substantial product hazards;

-requires, where appropriate, corrective action with respect to specific substantially hazardous consumer products already in commerce;

-collects information on consumer product-related injuries and maintains a comprehensive Injury Information Clearinghouse;

-conducts research on consumer product hazards;

encourages and assists in the development of voluntary standards related to the safety of consumer products;

-establishes, where appropriate, mandatory consumer product standards; -bans, where appropriate, hazardous consumer products; and

-conducts outreach programs for consumers, industry, and local governments.

Offices

The Consumer Product Safety Commission headquarters is located at 5401 Westbard Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20207. Its regional offices are in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, New York, and San Francisco. Resident posts are maintained in various cities.

Sources of Information

Consumer Information The Commission operates a toll-free Consumer Product Safety Hotline, 800638-CPSC, and a teletypewriter for the hearing-impaired, 800-638-8270 (in Maryland only, 800-492-8104).

General Inquiries Information on Commission activities may be obtained from the Office of Information and

Public Affairs, Consumer Product Safety
Commission, Washington, DC 20207.
Phone, 301-492-6580.

Reading Room A public information room is maintained at the Commission headquarters.

For further information, contact the Office of Information and Public Affairs, Consumer Product Safety Commission, 5401 Westbard Avenue, Bethesda, MD, 20207. Phone, 301-492-6580.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

401 M Street SW., Washington, DC 20460

Phone, 202-382-2090

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Associate Enforcement Counsel, Water

Enforcement Division

Associate Enforcement Counsel, Hazardous Waste Enforcement Division

Associate Enforcement Counsel, Pesticides and Toxic Substances Enforcement Division

Director, National Enforcement Investigations Center-Denver, CO

General Counsel

Deputy General Counsel

Assistant Administrator for Policy, Planning and Evaluation

Deputy Assistant Administrator for Policy,
Planning and Evaluation

Director, Office of Policy Analysis

Director, Office of Standards and Regulations
Director, Office of Management Systems and
Evaluation

Assistant Administrator for External Affairs
Deputy Assistant Administrator for External
Affairs

Director, Office of Community and

Intergovernmental Relations

Director, Office of Congressional Liaison
Director, Office of Public Affairs

Director, Office of Federal Activities
Director, Office of Legislative Analysis
Inspector General

Deputy Inspector General

Assistant Inspector General, Office of Audit Deputy Assistant Inspector General, Office of Audit

Assistant Inspector General, Office of

Investigations

Deputy Assistant Inspector General, Office of Investigations

Assistant Inspector General, Office of

Management and Technical Assessment

Assistant Administrator for Water

Deputy Assistant Administrator for Water
Director, Office of Water Enforcement and
Permits

Director, Office of Water Regulations and
Standards

Director, Office of Municipal Pollution

Control

Director, Office of Drinking Water

Director, Office of Marine and Estuarine

Protection

Director, Office of Ground-Water Protection Assistant Administrator for Solid Waste and Emergency Response

Deputy Assistant Administrator for Solid
Waste and Emergency Response

GLENN L. UNTERBERGER

EDWARD E. REICH

FREDERICK F. STEIHL

THOMAS P. Gallagher

FRANCIS S. BLAKE GERALD H. YAMADA LINDA FISHER

ROBERT WAYLAND

RICHARD D. MORGENSTERN
THOMAS KELLY
BRUCE T. BARKLEY

JENNIFER JOY WILSON
R. AUGUSTUS Edwards

PEGGY KNIGHT

PATRICK QUINN
LINDA REED

RICHARD E. SANDERSON A. HENRY SCHILLING JOHN C. MARTIN

DONALD E. KIRKENDALL ERNEST E. BRADLEY III KENNETH A. KONZ

JOHN E. BARDEN

DANIEL S. SWEENEY

ANNA VIRBICK

LAWRENCE J. JENSEN REBECCA HANMER JAMES ELDER

WILLIAM A. WHITTINGTON

MICHAEL QUIGLEY

MICHAEL COOK

TUDOR T. DAVIES

MARION MLAY

J. WINSTON PORTER

JACK W. MCGRAW

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