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-apply such financial procedures as it deems necessary to ensure that grants are applied in accordance with the purposes for which such grants are made;

-develop appraisal procedures to ensure that grants are applied in a manner consistent with the broad foreign policy objectives of the United States Government;

-have access to all books, documents, papers, and records of the Radios related or pertinent to Federal assistance;

-procure specialized electronic equipment;

-receive donations, bequests, devises, gifts, and other forms of contributions of cash, services, and other property from persons, corporations, foundations, and all other groups and entities both within

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For further information, contact the Program Officer, Board for International Broadcasting, Suite 400, 1201 Connecticut Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20036. Phone, 202-254-8040.

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY

Washington, DC 20505

Phone, 703-482-1100

Director of Central Intelligence

Deputy Director of Central Intelligence

WILLIAM H. WEBSTER ROBERT M. GATES

[For the Central Intelligence Agency statement of organization, see the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 32, Part 1900]

The Central Intelligence Agency was established under the National Security Council by the National Security Act of 1947, as amended (50 U.S.C. 401 et seq.). It now functions under that statute, Executive Order 12333 of December 4, 1981, and other laws, regulations, and directives.

The Director of Central Intelligence is the head of the Central Intelligence Agency and the principal spokesperson for the Agency and the Intelligence Community. The Director and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence are appointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.

The Central Intelligence Agency, under the direction of the President or the National Security Council:

-advises the National Security Council in matters concerning such intelligence activities of the Government departments and agencies as relate to national security;

-makes recommendations to the National Security Council for the coordination of such intelligence activities of the departments and agencies of the Government as relate to the national security;

-correlates and evaluates intelligence relating to the national security a

provides for the appropriate

dissemination of such intelligence within the Government;

-performs for intelligence agencies such additional services of common concern as the National Security Council determines can be more efficiently accomplished in the Agency;

-collects, produces, and disseminates counterintelligence and foreign intelligence, including information not otherwise obtainable. The collection of counterintelligence or foreign intelligence within the United States shall be coordinated with the FBI as required by procedures agreed upon by the Director of Central Intelligence and the Attorney General;

-collects, produces, and disseminates intelligence on foreign aspects of narcotics production and trafficking; -conducts counterintelligence activities outside the United States and, without assuming or performing any internal security functions, conducts counterintelligence activities within the United States in coordination with the FBI as required by procedures agreed upon by the Director of Central Intelligence and the Attorney General; -coordinates counterintelligence activities and the collection of information not otherwise obtainable when conducted outside the United States by other departments and agencies;

-conducts special activities approved by the President. No agency, except the CIA (or the Armed Forces of the United States in time of war declared by Congress or during any period covered by a report from the President to the Congress under the War Powers Resolution (50 U.S.C. 1541 et seq.), may conduct any special activity unless the President determines that another agency is more likely to achieve a particular objective;

-carries out or contracts for research, development, and procurement of technical systems and devices relating to authorized functions;

-protects the security of its installations, activities, information, property, and employees by appropriate means, including such investigations of applicants, employees, contractors, and other persons with similar associations with the CIA, as are necessary;

-conducts such administrative and technical support activities within and outside the United States as are necessary to perform its functions, including procurement and essential cover and proprietary arrangements; and -performs such other functions and duties relating to intelligence that affect the national security as the National Security Council may from time to time direct.

The Agency has no police, subpoena, or law enforcement powers or internal security functions.

For further information, contact the Central Intelligence Agency, Washington, DC 20505. Phone, 703482-1100.

COMMISSION ON THE BICENTENNIAL OF THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION

736 Jackson Place NW., Washington, DC 20503

Phone, 202-USA-1787

Chairman

WARREN E. BURGER

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[For the Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution statement of organization, see the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 45, Part 2000]

The Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution promotes, coordinates, and develops activities appropriate to commemorate the bicentennial of the Constitution, which was adopted at the Constitutional Convention on September 17, 1787.

The Commission was established by act of September 29, 1983 (97 Stat. 719), and extended through 1991 by Congress (100 Stat. 3063). The Commission is composed of 23 members, 20 of whom are appointed by the President. The Chief Justice of the United States, the President pro tempore of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, or their designees, are also members. The Chairman is designated by the President.

One of the chief responsibilities of the Commission is to encourage private organizations and State and local governments to organize and participate in bicentennial activities that

commemorate and examine the drafting, ratification, and history of the

Constitution.

The Commission seeks cooperation, advice, and assistance from both private and governmental agencies and organizations in carrying out its responsibilities and also delegates authority to State advisory commissions to assist in this effort. Additionally, the Commission serves as a clearinghouse for the collection and dissemination of information about bicentennial events and plans.

The celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Constitution will continue through 1991. Every State, city, town, organization, family, and individual in the Nation will be invited to

participate, and each community will be encouraged to conduct its own commemoration.

For further information, contact the Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution, 736 Jackson Place NW., Washington, DC 20503. Phone, 202-USA-1787.

COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS

1121 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20425 Phone, 202-376-8177

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[For the Commission on Civil Rights statement of organization, see the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 45, Part 701]

The Commission on Civil Rights holds public hearings and collects and studies information on discrimination or denials of equal protection of the laws because of race, color, religion, sex, age, handicap, national origin, or in the administration of justice. Voting rights, enforcement of Federal civil rights laws, and equality of opportunity in education, employment, and housing are among specific Commission factfinding efforts.

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Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20425. Phone, 202-376-8376. Employment Personnel Office, Room 603-B, 1121 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20425. Phone, 202376-8364.

Publications Commission publications are made available on request from the Publications Management Division,

Room 700, 1121 Vermont Avenue NW.,
Washington, DC 20425. Phone, 202-
376-8105. A catalog of publications may
be obtained from this office.

Reading Room The National Civil
Rights Clearinghouse Library is located in
Room 709, 1121 Vermont Avenue NW.
Phone, 202-376-8114.

For further information, contact the Public Affairs Unit, Commission on Civil Rights, 1121 Vermont Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20425. Phone, 202–376–8312. For deaf and hearing-impaired persons, all inquiries will be received at TTY phone, 202-376-8117.

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The Commission of Fine Arts supplies artistic advice relating to the appearance of Washington, DC. It reviews the plans for all public buildings, parks, and other architectural elements in the Capital and for private structures in certain areas of the city.

The Commission of Fine Arts was
established by Congress on May 17,
1910, (40 U.S.C. 104, 106), to advise
the President, Members of Congress, and
various governmental agencies on
matters pertaining to the appearance of
Washington, DC. This legislation
provided the Government with a
permanent commission whose seven
members, who are appointed by the
President, are qualified to give expert
advice on matters relating to art. The
legislation directs contracting officers of
the Federal and District Governments to
call for the Commission's advice on such
matters.

Further responsibilities and duties were added by statute (36 U.S.C. 124; 40 U.S.C. 121) and by Executive Orders 1259 of October 25, 1910, 1862 of November 28, 1913, and 3524 of July 28, 1921.

Activities

The Commission's members meet monthly to consider designs for public buildings, parks, and those elements that give the Capital its special appearance. Part of the Commission's purpose is the preservation of places and areas of

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