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such as Area Trends in Employment and Unemployment available by subscription through the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. Information about publications may be obtained from the ETA Information Office. Phone, 202523-6871.

The Office of Labor-Management Standards publishes the text of the LaborManagement Reporting and Disclosure Act (29 U.S.C. 401) and pamphlets that explain the reporting, election, bonding, and trusteeship provisions of the act. The pamphlets and reporting forms used by persons covered by the act are available free in limited quantities from the OLMS National Office at Room N-5616, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210, and from OLMS field offices listed in the telephone directory under United States Government, Department of Labor.

The Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration distributes fact sheets, pamphlets, and booklets on employer obligations and employee rights under ERISA. A list of publications is available by writing: PWBA, Division of Public Information, Room N-5666, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210. Phone, 202-523-8921.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics has an Information Office in the General Accounting Office Building, 441 G Street NW., Washington, DC 20212, phone, 202-523-1221. Publications are both free and for sale, but for-sale items must be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office.

Inquiries may be directed to the Washington Information Office or to the Bureau's regional offices.

Publications of the Employment Standards Administration, such as Handy Reference Guide to the Fair Labor Standards Act, and OFCCP, Making Affirmative Action Work, are available from the nearest area office. Single copies are free.

Reading Rooms Department of Labor Library, Room N2439, Frances Perkins Building, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210. Phone, 202523-6988.

The Office of Labor-Management Standards maintains a Public Disclosure Room at Room N-5616, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210. Reports filed under the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act may be examined there and may be purchased for 10 cents per page. Reports also may be obtained by calling the Public Disclosure Room at 202-523-7393 or by contacting an OLMS field office listed in the telephone directory under United States Government, Department of Labor.

The Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration maintains a Public Disclosure Room at Room N-5507, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210. Reports filed under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act may be examined there and may be purchased for 10 cents per page or by calling the Public Disclosure Room at 202-523-8771.

For further information concerning the Department of Labor, contact the Office of Information and Public Affairs, Department of Labor, Room S-1032, 200 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20210. Phone, 202-523-7316.

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United States Mission to the United Nations1

799 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017

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[For the Department of State statement of organization, see the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 22, Part 5]

The Department of State advises the President in the formulation and execution of foreign policy. As Chief Executive, the President has overall responsibility for the foreign policy of the United States. The Department of State's primary objective in the conduct of foreign relations is to promote the long-range security and wellbeing of the United States. The Department determines and analyzes the facts relating to American overseas interests, makes recommendations on policy and future action, and takes the necessary steps to carry out established policy. In so doing, the Department engages in continuous consultations with the American public, the Congress, other U.S. departments and agencies, and foreign governments; negotiates treaties and agreements with foreign nations; speaks for the United States in the United Nations and in more than 50 major international organizations in which the United States participates; and represents the United States at more than 800 international conferences annually.

'For a description of the organization and functions of the United Nations, see page 777.

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The Department of State, the senior executive department of the U.S. Government, was established by act of July 27, 1789 (1 Stat. 28) as the Department of Foreign Affairs and was renamed Department of State by act of September 15, 1789 (1 Stat. 68).

The Secretary of State is the principal official of the Department and performs duties enjoined or entrusted to him by the President in accordance with the Constitution, relative to correspondence, commissions, or instructions to or with public ministers or consuls from the United States, or to negotiations with public ministers from foreign states or princes, or to memorials or other applications from foreign public ministers or other foreigners, or to such other matters respecting foreign affairs, as the President assigns to the Department; and, furthermore, the Secretary conducts the business of the Department in such manner as the President orders or instructs.

The act of September 15, 1789, provided that certain domestic duties, such as maintaining custody of The Great Seal of the United States and the publication of laws enacted by Congress, were entrusted to the Department. During the first few decades of the Republic, a large number of additional domestic functions were assigned to the Department, which for a time came to be the equivalent of the "home department" of the Government. These responsibilities of the Secretary were eventually transferred, for the most part, to other Federal agencies as the U.S. Government grew in size and complexity during the 19th and 20th centuries.

The duties of the Department of State in the field of foreign affairs have not changed significantly in scope since the early years of the United States but have become far more detailed as the Nation has grown and its international commitments have multiplied.

Office of the Secretary Secretary of State The Secretary of State, the principal foreign policy adviser to the President, is responsible for the overall direction, coordination, and

supervision of U.S. foreign relations and for the interdepartmental activities of the U.S. Government overseas. The Secretary is the first-ranking member of the Cabinet, is a member of the National Security Council, and is in charge of the operations of the Department, including the Foreign Service.

Deputy Secretary of State The Deputy Secretary of State is the Secretary's principal deputy and serves as Acting Secretary in the Secretary's absence. Political Affairs The Under Secretary for Political Affairs assists the Secretary and Deputy Secretary in the formulation and conduct of foreign policy and in the overall direction of the Department, including coordination of relations with other departments and agencies and interdepartmental activities of the U.S. Government overseas.

Economic and Agricultural Affairs The Under Secretary for Economic and Agricultural Affairs is principal adviser to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary in the formulation and conduct of foreign economic policy. Specific areas for which the Under Secretary is responsible include international trade, agriculture, energy, finance, transportation, and relations with developing countries. Security Assistance, Science and Technology The Under Secretary for Security Assistance, Science and Technology is responsible for assuring the integration of all elements of the Foreign Assistance Program as an effective instrument of U.S. foreign policy and serves as Chairman of the Arms Transfer Management Group. The Under Secretary is also responsible for international scientific and technological issues, communications and information policy, and technology transfers. Management The Under Secretary for Management is the principal management official of the Department. The Under Secretary serves as the principal adviser to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary on management matters, including direction of all budgetary, administrative, and personnel policies of the Department and the Foreign Service. The Under Secretary also coordinates the activities of the

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