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2d Session.
1 No. 326.

77

CITIZENSHIP OF THE UNITED STATES, EXPATRIATION,
AND PROTECTION ABROAD.

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LETTER

FROM

THE SECRETARY OF STATE,

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SUBMITTING

REPORT ON THE SUBJECT OF CITIZENSHIP, EXPATRIATION,
AND PROTECTION ABROAD.

DECEMBER 20, 1906.-Referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs,
and ordered to be printed.

WASHINGTON:

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

1906.

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2d Session.

No. 326.

CITIZENSHIP OF THE UNITED STATES, EXPATRIATION, AND PROTECTION ABROAD.

LETTER

FROM

THE SECRETARY OF STATE,

REPORT ON THE SUBJECT OF CITIZENSHIP, EXPATRIATION, AND PROTECTION ABROAD.

SUBMITTING

DECEMBER 20, 1906.-Referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs and ordered to be printed.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 18, 1906.

SIR: On the 13th of April, 1906, the Senate passed a joint resolution providing for a commission to examine into the subjects of citizenship of the United States, expatriation, and protection abroad, and to make a report and recommendations thereon, to be transmitted to Congress for its consideration. The resolution carried an appropriation of $10,000 for the expense of the commission. (S. Res. No. 30, 59th Congress, 1st session.)

On the 6th of June, 1906, the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, to which aforesaid joint resolution had been referred, reported to the House as follows:

It is the opinion of the committee that legislation is required to settle some of the embarrassing questions that arise in reference to citizenship, expatriation, and the protection of American citizens abroad. The committee, however, is not convinced of the necessity of having a commission to consider these questions or to prepare legislation for submission to Congress. Such commis sions are sure to be leisurely, certain to be costly, and apt to be ineffective.

It seems to the committee that the same end can be reached in a more practical way. More information on these questions can be furnished by those who have been obliged to deal with them practically than by any commission of outsiders, however distinguished. We should be glad if the Secretary of State would select some of the gentlemen connected with the State Department who have given special attention to these subjects, have them prepare a report and propose legislation that could be considered by Congress at the next session. The result of such a commission we are confident would be of value. If there was any small expense for clerk hire, etc., in connection with its work, this could, as we understand, be defrayed, under the direction of the Secretary of State, from the general appropriations made by Congress. If a bill remedying such evils as may exist is submitted at the beginning of the next session it shall have the careful attention of this committee, and if its contents are approved we will make every endeavor to have it promptly enacted into law. (Rept. No. 4784, 59th Cong., 1st sess.)

Pursuant to this suggestion of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, Mr. James B. Scott, solicitor for the Department of State, Mr. David

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