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reading space and orderly conditions and procedures.

(c) Study rooms. Upon request a limited number of study rooms may be made available to individuals requiring extensive use of Library materials. Requests for study rooms shall be addressed in writing to the Director. The Director shall give priority, in the following order, for study room use to:

(1) Persons engaged in "special scientific projects” under section 473 of the Act (42 U.S.C. 286b-4),

(2) Health-sciences professionals, and

(3) The general public. $ 4.5 Use of materials from the collec

tions. (a) Unrestricted materials. Except as otherwise provided in this section, materials from the collections are generally available to any interested person only in facilities provided by the Library for this purpose. The Director may prescribe additional reasonable rules to assure the most effective use of the Library's resources by healthsciences professionals and to protect the collections from misuse or damage. The rules must be consistent with the regulations in this part and applicable Department regulations and policies on nondiscrimination. Materials in the collections are available upon each request which assures, to the Director's satisfaction, that the materials will be safeguarded from misuse, damage, loss, or misappropriation, and will be returned promptly after use or upon request of the Library.

(b) Restricted materials—(1) Historical collection. Materials from the historical collection are available only as the Director may permit to assure their maximum preservation and protection. Copies of these materials may be made available in the form of microfilm and other copies, for which reasonable fees may be charged.

(2) Gifts. Materials in the collections are available only in accordance with any limitations imposed as a condition of the acquisition of those materials, whether the acquisition was by gift or purchase.

(c) Loans (1) General. Requests for loans of materials must assure the Library that (i) the materials will be safeguarded from misuse, damage, loss,

or misappropriation and (ii) the materials will be returned promptly after use or upon request of the Library. The Library may provide copies in lieu of original materials, which need not be returned unless otherwise stated at the time of the loan.

(2) Loans of audiovisual materials. Audiovisual materials are available for loan under the same general terms as printed materials.

(3) Loans to other libraries. Upon request materials or copies are available for use through libraries of public or private agencies or institutions. The requesting library must assure that it has first exhausted its own collection resources, those of other local libraries in the geographic area, and those of the Regional Medical Library network (including Regional and Resource Libraries) before making a request for a loan.

(4) Loans to health-sciences professionals. The Director may make loans of materials directly to health-sciences professionals. An individual wishing a loan of library materials must assure to the satisfaction of the Director that the individual is geographically isolated, in terms of distance or available transportation, from medical literature resources likely to contain the desired material. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0925-0276)

84.6 Reference, bibliographic, repro

duction, and consultation services. (a) General. To the extent resources permit, the Library will make available, upon request, reference, bibliographic, reproduction, and consultation services. Priority will be given to requests from health-sciences professionals for services not reasonably available through local or regional libraries.

(b) Specialized bibliographic services. The Director may provide bibliographies on individually selected medical or scientific topics upon request where it is consistent with the Library's purpose. The Director may publish and make available for general distribution by the Library, bibliographic searches determined to be of general interest. The Library may also produce and distribute a limited number of bibliographies on topics of general interest to public or nonprofit health-related professional societies, research organizations, and other group users. These bibliographies may be produced on a regularly recurring or intermittent basis under contract between the Library and public or nonprofit agencies, when determined in each case by the Director to be necessary to assure more effective distribution of the bibliographic information.

(c) Information retrieval system computer tapes. To the extent Library resources permit and in order to further the Library's purpose, the Director may make available upon request by agencies, organizations, and institutions copies of all or part of the Library's magnetic tapes.

APPENDIX C TO PART 5 CRITERIA FOR DES

IGNATION OF AREAS HAVING SHORTAGES OF

MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS APPENDIX D TO PART 5-CRITERIA FOR DES

IGNATION OF AREAS HAVING SHORTAGES OF

VISION CARE PROFESSIONAL(S) APPENDIX E TO PART 5-CRITERIA FOR DES

IGNATION OF AREAS HAVING SHORTAGES OF

PODIATRIC PROFESSIONAL(S) APPENDIX F TO PART 5-CRITERIA FOR DES

IGNATION OF AREAS HAVING SHORTAGES OF

PHARMACY PROFESSIONAL(S) APPENDIX G TO PART 5-CRITERIA FOR DES

IGNATION OF AREAS HAVING SHORTAGES OF

VETERINARY PROFESSIONAL(S) AUTHORITY: Sec. 215 of the Public Health Service Act, 58 Stat. 690 (42 U.S.C. 216); sec. 332 of the Public Health Service Act, 90 Stat. 2270-2272 (42 U.S.C. 254e).

SOURCE: 45 FR 76000, Nov. 17, 1980, unless otherwise noted.

EDITORIAL NOTE: Nomenclature changes to part 5 appear at 57 FR 2480, Jan, 22, 1992.

84.7 Fees.

The Director may charge reasonable fees for any service provided by the Library under this part, in accordance with a schedule available at the Library upon request, which are designed to recover all or a portion of the cost to the Library of providing the service.

$5.1 Purpose.

These regulations establish criteria and procedures for the designation of geographic areas, population groups, medical facilities, and other public facilities, in the States, as health professional(s) shortage areas.

$ 4.8 Publication of the Library and in

formation about the Library. Lists of bibliographies, Library publications sold by the Government Printing Office, necessary application forms, and other information concerning the organization, operation, functions, and services of the Library, are available from the National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland 20894.

PART 5-DESIGNATION OF HEALTH

PROFESSIONAL(S) SHORTAGE AREAS

$5.2 Definitions.

Act means the Public Health Service Act, as amended.

Health professional(s) shortage area means any of the following which the Secretary determines has a shortage of health professional(s): (1) An urban or rural area (which need not conform to the geographic boundaries of a political subdivision and which is a rational area for the delivery of health services); (2) a population group; or (3) a public or nonprofit private medical facility.

Health service area means a health service area whose boundaries have been designated by the Secretary, under section 1511 of the Act, for purposes of health planning activities.

Health systems agency or HSA means the health systems agency designated, under section 1515 of the Act, to carry out health planning activities for a specific health service area.

Medical facility means a facility for the delivery of health services and includes: (1) A community health center,

Sec. 5.1 Purpose. 5.2 Definitions. 5.3 Procedures for designation of health

professional(s) shortage areas. 5.4 Notification and publication of designa

tions and withdrawals. APPENDIX A TO PART 5-CRITERIA FOR DES

IGNATION OF AREAS HAVING SHORTAGES OF

PRIMARY MEDICAL CARE PROFESSIONAL(S) APPENDIX B TO PART 5-CRITERIA FOR DES

IGNATION OF AREAS HAVING SHORTAGES OF
DENTAL PROFESSIONAL(S)

means

an

public health center, outpatient medical facility, or community mental health center; (2) a hospital, State mental hospital, facility for long-term care, or rehabilitation facility; (3) a migrant health center or an Indian Health service facility; (4) a facility for delivery of health services to inmates in a U.S. penal or correctional institution (under section 323 of the Act) or a State correctional institution; (5) a Public Health Service medical facility (used in connection with the delivery of health services under section 320, 321, 322, 324, 325, or 326 of the Act); or (6) any other Federal medical facility. Metropolitan area

area which has been designated by the Office of Management and Budget as a standard metropolitan statistical area (SMSA). All other areas are "non-metropolitan areas.

Poverty level means the povery level as defined by the Bureau of the Census, using the poverty index adopted by a Federal Interagency Committee in 1969, and updated each year to reflect changes in the Consumer Price Index.

Secretary means the Secretary of Health and Human Services and any other officer or employee of the Department to whom the authority involved has been delegated.

State includes, in addition to the several States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.

State health planning and development agency or SHPDA means a State health planning and development agency designated under section 1521 of the Act. 85.3 Procedures for designation of

health professional(s) shortage

areas. (a) Using data available to the Department from national, State, and local sources and based upon the criteria in the appendices to this part, the Department will annually prepare listings (by State and health service area) of currently designated health professional(s) shortage areas and potentially designatable areas, together with appropriate related data available to the Department. Relevant portions of this

material will then be forwarded to each health systems agency, State health planning and development agency, and Governor, who will be asked to review the listings for their State, correct any errors of which they are aware, and offer their recommendations, if any, within 90 days, as to which geographic areas, population groups, and facilities in areas under their jurisdiction should be designated. An information copy of these listings will also be made available, upon request, to interested parties for their use in providing comments or recommendations to the Secretary and/or to the appropriate HSA, SHPDA, or Governor.

(b) In addition, any agency or individual may request the Secretary to designate (or withdraw the designation of) a particular geographic area, population group, or facility as a health professional(s) shortage area. Each request will be forwarded by the Secretary to the appropriate HSA, SHPDA, and Governor, who will be asked to review it and offer their recommendations, if any, within 30 days. An information copy will also be made available to other interested parties, upon request, for their use in providing comments or recommendations to the Secretary and/or to the appropriate HSA, SHPDA, or Governor.

(c) In each case where the designation of a public facility (including a Federal medical facility) is under consideration, the Secretary will give written notice of the proposed designation to the chief administrative officer of the facility, who will be asked to review it and offer their recommendations, if any, within 30 days.

(d) After review of the available information and consideration of the comments and recommendations submitted, the Secretary will designate health professional(s) shortage areas and withdraw the designation of any areas which have been determined no longer to have a shortage of health professional(s). $5.4 Notification and publication of

designations and withdrawals. (a) The Secretary will give written notice of the designation (or withdrawal of designation) of a health professional(s) shortage area, not later than 60 days from the date of the designation (or withdrawal of designation), to:

(1) The Governor of each State in which the area, population group, medical facility, or other public facility so designated is in whole or in part located;

(2) Each HSA for a health service area which includes all or any part of the area, population group, medical facility, or other public facility so designated;

(3) The SHPDA for each State in which the area, population group, medical facility, or other public facility so designated is in whole or in part located; and

(4) Appropriate public or nonprofit private entities which are located in or which have a demonstrated interest in the area so designated.

(b) The Secretary will periodically publish updated lists of designated health professional(s) shortage areas in the FEDERAL REGISTER, by type of professional(s) shortage. An updated list of areas for each type of professional(s) shortage will be published at least once annually.

(c) The effective date of the designation of an area shall be the date of the notification letter to the individual or agency which requested the designation, or the date of publication in the FEDERAL REGISTER, whichever comes first.

(d) Once an area is listed in the FEDERAL REGISTER as a designated health professional(s) shortage area, the effective date of any later withdrawal of the area's designation shall be the date when notification of the withdrawal, or an updated list of designated areas which does not include it, is published in the FEDERAL REGISTER.

fessional(s) if both the following criteria are met:

(a) The institution has at least 250 inmates.

(b) The ratio of the number of internees per year to the number of FTE primary care physicians serving the institution is at least 1,000:1.

Here the number of internees is defined as follows:

(i) If the number of new inmates per year and the average length-of-stay are not specified, or if the information provided does not indicate that intake medical examinations are routinely performed upon entry, thenNumber of internees-average number of inmates.

(ii) If the average length-of-stay is specified as one year or more, and intake medical examinations are routinely performed upon entry, then-Number of internees=average number of inmates+(0.3)xnumber of new inmates per year.

(iii) If the average length-of-stay is specified as less than one year, and intake examinations are routinely performed upon entry, then-Number of internees-average number of inmates+(0.2)x(1+ALOS/2)xnumber of new inmates per year where ALOS=average length-of-stay (in fraction of year). (The number of FTE primary care physicians is computed as in part I, section B, paragraph 3 above.)

2. Determination of Degree of Shortage.

Designated correctional institutions will be assigned to degree-of-shortage groups based on the number of inmates and/or the ratio (R) of internees to primary care physicians, as follows:

Group 1-Institutions with 500 or more inmates and no physicians.

Group 2-Other institutions with no physicians and institutions with R greater than (or equal to) 2,000:1.

Group 3-Institutions with R greater than (or equal to) 1,000:1 but less than 2,000:1.

B. Methodology.

In determining whether an area meets the criteria established by paragraph A of this part, the following methodology will be used:

1. Rational Areas for the Delivery of Primary Medical Care Services.

(a) The following areas will be considered rational areas for the delivery of primary medical care services:

(i) A county, or a group of contiguous counties whose population centers are within 30 minutes travel time of each other.

(ii) A portion of a county, or an area made up of portions of more than one county, whose population, because of topography, market or transportation patterns, distinctive population characteristics or other factors, has limited access to contiguous area resources, as measured generally by a travel time greater than 30 minutes to such resources.

APPENDIX A TO PART 5 CRITERIA FOR

DESIGNATION OF AREAS HAVING
SHORTAGES OF PRIMARY MEDICAL
CARE PROFESSIONAL(S)

Part I-Geographic Areas A. Federal and State Correctional Institutions.

1. Criteria.

Medium to maximum security Federal and State correctional institutions and youth detention facilities will be designated as having a shortage of primary medical care pro

(iii) Established neighborhoods and communities within metropolitan areas which display a strong self-identity (as indicated by a homogeneous socioeconomic or demographic structure and/or a tradition of interaction or interdependency), have limited interaction with contiguous areas, and which, in general, have a minimum population of 20,000.

(b) The following distances will be used as guidelines in determining distances corresponding to 30 minutes travel time:

(i) Under normal conditions with primary roads available: 20 miles.

(ii) In mountainous terrain or in areas with only secondary roads available: 15 miles.

(iii) In flat terrain or in areas connected by interstate highways: 25 miles.

Within inner portions of metropolitan areas, information on the public transportation system will be used to determine the

distance corresponding to 30 minutes travel time.

2. Population Count.

The population count used will be the total permanent resident civilian population of the area, excluding inmates of institutions, with the following adjustments, where appropriate:

(a) Adjustments to the population for the differing health service requirements of various age-sex population groups will be computed using the table below of visit rates for 12 age-sex population cohorts. The total expected visit rate will first be obtained by multiplying each of the 12 visit rates in the table by the size of the area population within that particular age-sex cohort and adding the resultant 12 visit figures together. This total expected visit rate will then be divided by the U.S. average per capita visit rate of 5.1, to obtain the adjusted population for the area.

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(b) The effect of transient populations on the need of an area for primary care professional(s) will be taken into account as follows:

(1) Seasonal residents, i.e., those who maintain a residence in the area but inhabit it for only 2 to 8 months per year, may be included but must be weighted in proportion to the fraction of the year they are present in the area.

(ii) Other tourists (non-resident) may be included in an area's population but only with a weight of 0.25, using the following formula: Effective tourist contribution to population=0.25x(fraction of year tourists are present in area)x(average daily number of tourists during portion of year that tourists are present).

(iii) Migratory workers and their families may be included in an area's population, using the following formula: Effective migrant contribution to population=(fraction of year migrants

present in area)x(average daily number of migrants during portion of year that migrants are present).

3. Counting of Primary Care Practitioners.

(a) All non-Federal doctors of medicine (M.D.) and doctors of osteopathy (D.O.) providing direct patient care who practice principally in one of the four primary care specialities--general or family practice, general internal medicine, pediatrics, and obstetrics and gynecology will be counted. Those physicians engaged solely in administration, re

search, and teaching will be excluded. Adjustments for the following factors will be made in computing the number of full-timeequivalent (FTE) primary care physicians:

(i) Interns and residents will be counted as 0.1 full-time equivalent (FTE) physicians.

(ii) Graduates of foreign medical schools who are not citizens or lawful permanent residents of the United States will be excluded from physician counts.

(iii) Those graduates of foreign medical schools who are citizens or lawful permanent residents of the United States, but do not have unrestricted licenses to practice medicine, will be counted as 0.5 FTE physicians.

(b) Practitioners who are semi-retired, who operate a reduced practice due to infirmity or other limiting conditions, or who provide patient care services to the residents of the area only on a part-time basis will be discounted through the use of full-time equivalency figures. A 40-hour work week will be used as the standard for determining fulltime equivalents in these cases. For practitioners working less than a 40-hour week, every four (4) hours (or 14 day) spent providing patient care, in either ambulatory or inpatient settings, will be counted as 0.1 FTE (with numbers obtained for FTE's rounded to the nearest 0.1 FTE), and each physician providing patient care 40 or more hours a week will be counted as 1.0 FTE physician. (For cases where data are available only for the

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