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of the Chairman of the agency. Total matching of the grant on a one

to-one basis is required. Source: 20 U.S.C. 956 (1)(4). Length and Time Phasing of Assistance: Thirty-six months. Funds must

be expended during the grant period. Funds are released as required. POST ASSISTANCE REQUIREMENTS: Reports: Compliance plans are required annually. Cash report and an ex

penditure report are required quarterly. Final expenditure reports are due within 90 days after completion or termination of project support

by NEH. Audits: For nongovernmental recipients, audits are to be carried out in

accordance with the provisions set forth in OMB Circular No. A-110, “Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Nonprofit Organizations Uniform Administrative Requirements” and with OMB Circular No. A-133, “Audits of Institutions of Higher Education and Other Nonprofit Organizations.” In addition, grants are subject to inspection and audits by NEH and other

Federal officials. Records: Documentation of expenditures and other fiscal records must be

retained for three years following the submission of the final expendi

ture report.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION:

Account Identification: 59-0200-0-1-503.
Obligations: (Grants) FY 99 $28,000,000; FY 00 est $29,160,000; and

FY 01 est $38,320,000.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance: Range of assistance for

FY 1999 was $206,900 to $1,231,000 and the average was $494,236.
For FY 2000, the range was $217,900 to $1,299,200, and the average

was $520,514. PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS: A singular achievement of Federal/

State Partnership has been the establishment, in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Northern Marianas, American Samoa, and Guam of 56 continuing nonprofit organizations which have succeeded at serving as the link between the humanities and the interests and concerns of the States' citizens. In fiscal year 1999, council-sponsored programs reached millions of Americans: among them were 240,000 participants in K to 12 teachers projects; 538,000 in Chautauqua-type performances; 44,000 in literacy programs; 296,000 in book discussions, 150,000 attendees in cultural tourism projects; and 745,000 part nts in seminars, conferences, and lectures. Council-funded exhibitions attracted 4.9 million visitors, while council-funded media projects attracted audiences of 129 million. Each State council sets its own guidelines for application categories to

respond to the needs and resources in its State. REGULATIONS, GUIDELINES, AND LITERATURE: 45 CFR 1100

and 1105. The publication entitled “Overview of Endowment Programs” is available upon request from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Room 402, Washington, DC 20506. Available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, is the wment's official publication, “Humanities" by subscription (6 issues annually, $22.00 domestic, $27.50 foreign). Addresses and phone numbers for the 56 State humanities councils are available from Federal/State Partnership, NEH, Room 511,

Washington, DC 20506, and from the NEH web site, http://neh.gov. INFORMATION CONTACTS: Regional or Local Office: Located in each State. Addresses available

from National Endowment for the Humanities. Headquarters Office: Federal/State Partnership, National Endowment for

the Humanities, Room 511, Washington, DC 20506. Telephone: (202)

606-8254. Use the same number for FTS. RELATED PROGRAMS: 45.163, Promotion of the Humanities—Semi

nars and Institutes; 45.164, Promotion of the Humanities–Public Pro

grams. EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS: Fourteen State humanities coun

cils have received special Model Humanities Project Grants of $20,000 each intended to encourage creative Statewide partnerships and enduring networks among humanities organizations. The Wyoming Council for the Humanities will join with the American Studies program at the University of Wyoming and the Wyoming Health Resources Network to develop a series of literature-based discussion programs designed for civic leaders, school boards, local governments, service organizations, business organizations, and labor unions to bring together a diverse

group of people to talk about what makes a healthy community and a good society. The Montana Committee for the Humanities will work with several partners, including the Center for the Rocky Mountain West at the University of Montana, the Montana Consensus Council, the Montana Extension Service, Bozeman Public Library and the Western Heritage Center on a project called "Toward Deliberative Dialogue in Westem Communities” to encourage more thoughtful public conversations on topics important to the civic and cultural life of all Montanans. The Montana Committee, with its partners, will develop bibliographies and reading collections, films and video collections, speakers bureau programs, reading and discussion programs, and a grant initiative that will focus on issues of civic engagement, deliberative dialogue, civic discourse and related themes. A number of State councils have collaborated with their State's adult basic literacy and adult education organizations to prevent the illiteracy of a parent from being passed on to the next generation. In Eau Claire, the Wisconsin Humanities Council organized a program for recent Hmong immigrants for whom English is a second language, as part of the National Connections program designed originally by the Vermont Council on the Humanities. In Oshkosh, Wisconsin, inmates at the Oshkosh Correctional Institution focused on the theme of friendship in their National Connections program. The West Virginia Council for the Humanities recently published, In the Mountain State: A West Virginia Folklore and Cultural Studies Curriculum, to assist teachers of fourth and eighth graders to teach West Virginia history. The Florida Center for Teachers, part of the Florida Humanities Council, will offer twelve institutes for teachers in 2000, with such diverse topics as “Searching for a Sense of Place,” “Plagues in Medicine and Myth,” “Taking Humor Seriously,” and “Archaeology and Community." Using Edsitement, the NEH is now working with several State humanities councils to help teachers participating in their seminars and institutes to integrate electronic resources in the humanities into their teaching. The Tennessee Humanities Council and its Tennessee Center for the Book presented the tenth annual Southem Festival of Books: A Celebration of the Written Word at War memorial Plaza in Nashville, attracting more than 30,000 people. Events included panel discussions, author readings and discussion sessions, and a children's stage for activities for children

and families. Nine other State councils also sponsor book festivals. CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROPOSALS: Each State council sets its

own guidelines and criteria for assessing proposals, which are widely disseminated within the State. The criteria for State council funding from NEH are established in the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, as amended, 20 U.S.C. Section 950, 956, and by the NEH Federal/State Partnership.

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45.130 PROMOTION OF THE HUMANITIES

CHALLENGE GRANTS FEDERAL AGENCY: NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMAN

ITIES, NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HU

MANITIES AUTHORIZATION: National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities

Act of 1965, as amended, Public Law 89-209, 20 U.S.C. 951 et seq. OBJECTIVES: To support educational and cultural institutions and organi

zations in order to increase their financial stability and to sustain or improve the quality of humanities programs, services, or resources. Normally, institutions requesting their first NEH challenge grant must raise at least three dollars in new donations from nonfederal sources to receive each Federal dollar. Institutions requesting subsequent chal

lenge grants must raise at least four dollars for each Federal dollar. TYPES OF ASSISTANCE: Project Grants. USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds may be applied to a variety of

institutional needs which an applicant has demonstrated serve both the humanities and the institution's long-term objectives. The major purpose of a Challenge Grant is to help institutions and organizations attain or sustain a high level of quality in humanities programs or activities by building long-term capital resources. The most common and preferred expenditure of grant and matching funds is the creation of endowments. Also possible where the need is compelling are direct expenditures such as library acquisitions, technological enhancement, construction and renovation, debt retirement, and other costs clearly attributable to improvements in humanities programs and activities. Funds may not be used for general operating support or undergraduate scholarships and prizes or for projects eligible for support from other

NEH programs. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS: Applicant Eligibility: Any public or private nonprofit institution or orga

nization working wholly or in part within the humanities may apply, including the following: two-year and four-year colleges; universities; museums; historical societies; research libraries; public libraries; advanced study centers; media organizations; university presses; professional societies; educational, cultural, State humanities councils, or community groups. State and local governments and U.S. Territories are eligible to apply on their own behalf or on behalf of nonprofit institutions, associations or organizations within their jurisdictions. Individuals and public and private elementary and secondary schools are not

eligible to apply. Beneficiary Eligibility: All applicant organizations and institutions and

all users of their humanities resources, programs, or activities. Credentials/Documentation: This program is excluded from coverage

under OMB Circular No. A-87. APPLICATION AND AWARD PROCESS: Preapplication Coordination: None required, but preliminary discussion

with Endowment staff and the submission of a draft application at least eight weeks before the deadline are strongly encouraged. This program is excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-102 and E.O.

12372. Application Procedure: Direct application to the Office of Challenge

Grants, NEH. Application instructions provided by this office upon receipt of general inquiry. This program is excluded from coverage under

OMB Circular No. A-110. Award Procedure: Applications are reviewed by administrators of hu

manities institutions, panels of scholars, and other appropriate individuals. Awards are made by the Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities after recommendation by the National Council on

the Humanities. Deadlines: May 1 of each year and special deadlines as announced.

Deadlines are receipt deadlines. Write or call the NEH Office of Chal

lenge Grants. Range of Approval/Disapproval Time: Seven months (approximately

210 days) after deadline. Appeals: None, but applicant may request written reasons for rejection

and reapply with revised proposal to a subsequent application deadline. Renewals: Eligibility to apply for a subsequent award begins in the

fourth fiscal year after the close of the previous challenge grant. ASSISTANCE CONSIDERATIONS: Formula and Matching Requirements: Matching by a minimum of

three times the grant amount for institutions receiving their first challenge grant, and by a minimum of four times the grant amount for institutions receiving subsequent challenge grants, in new nonfederal contributions. Other matching ratios may be required for special initiatives, as announced. Source: Public Law 89-209, as amended; 20 U.S.C. 951; Arts and Humanities Cultural Act of 1976; Public Law 94-462. Con

tact: See Headquarters Office below. Length and Time Phasing of Assistance: From one to four years, as re

quested by the applicant. Funds must be expended during the grant period. Federal funds up to the amount offered in any year are released as matching amounts are certified to the Endowment and minimum an

nual matching requirements are met. POST ASSISTANCE REQUIREMENTS: Reports: Narrative progress reports are required biennially; reports on

nonfederal contributions, matching funds raised, and sources of giving are required annually. Final narrative and financial reports are due

within 90 days after the grant ending date. Audits: In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-133

(Revised, June 24, 1997), “Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations,” nonfederal entities that receive financial assistance of $300,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $300,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. For nongovernmental recipients, audits are to be carried out

in accordance with the provisions set forth in OMB Circular No. A110, “Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Nonprofit Organizations Uniform Administrative Requirements" and with OMB Circular No. A-133. In addition, grants

are subject to inspection and audits by NEH and other Federal officials. Records: To be retained by the grantee for three years from the date of

submission of the final narrative and financial reports. Records include financial documentation on all matching gifts and on all expenditures

of Federal and matching funds. FINANCIAL INFORMATION:

Account Identification: 59-0200-0-1-503.
Obligations: (Grants) FY 99 $11,330,850; FY 00 est $10,259,000; and

FY 01 est $10,530,000.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance: Applicants may request up

to $1,000,000 in Federal funds over three years. In fiscal year 1999, the largest award offered was $625,000, the smallest was $25,000; and

the average award was approximately $353,000. PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS: In fiscal year 1999, 112 applica

tions were received and 30 awards were made. For fiscal year 2000, 100 applications are anticipated and approximately 25 awards will be

made. REGULATIONS, GUIDELINES, AND LITERATURE: 45 CFR 1100

and 1105. Applications and guidelines, as well as a publication entitled “Overview of Endowment Programs," are available upon request from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Room 409, Washington, DC 20506. Available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, is the Endowment's official publication, “Humanities” by subscription (six issues

annually, $16.00 domestic, $20.00 foreign). INFORMATION CONTACTS:

Regional or Local Office: Not applicable.
Headquarters Office: Office of Challenge Grants, Room 420, National

Endowment for the Humanities, Washington, DC 20506. (202) 606

8309. Use the same number for FTS. RELATED PROGRAMS: None. EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS: (1) A community college will

use its $500,000 challenge grant to endow a humanities institute in partnership with a major museum. (2) A public broadcasting station will use its $400,000 challenge grant to establish an endowment for the production, acquisition, and promotion of humanities programming. (3) A public library will use its $400,000 challenge grant to establish an endowment for its public programs and the maintenance of its special collections devoted to its State's literature and history. (4) A museum will use its $575,000 challenge grant as the comerstone of a larger fund-raising campaign for an endowment to support a new regional art center. (5) An independent research library is using its $625,000 for building renovation and to endow conservation activities and informa

tion technologies. CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROPOSALS: To reach decisions about

funding, all reviewers of Challenge Grants applications are asked to evaluate the existing and potential quality of an applicant's programs in the humanities, its needs, management, and fund-raising capability. In light of the goals of the Challenge Grants Program, reviewers assess each application in accordance with the following criteria: (1) The significance of existing and planned humanities activities. (2) The impact of challenge grant funds. (3) The appropriateness of institutional resources and plans. (4) The feasibility of fund raising. Applicants for second or subsequent awards must describe and assess the effects of their prior awards.

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45.149 PROMOTION OF THE HUMANITIES DIVISION OF PRESERVATION AND ACCESS

FEDERAL AGENCY: NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMAN

ITIES, NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HU

MANITIES AUTHORIZATION: National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities

Act of 1965, as amended, Public Law 89-209, 20 U.S.C. 951 et seq. OBJECTIVES: To fund, wholly or partially, projects that will promote the

preservation of and provide intellectual access to resources held in libraries, museums, archives, historical organizations, and other collections that are important for research, education, and public program

ming in the humanities. TYPES OF ASSISTANCE: Project Grants. USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Grants support: a coordinated, na

tional program for the preservation of brittle books and serials in college and university libraries; the bibliographic control of printed works; the arrangement, description and preservation of archival collections, still and moving images, and recorded sound collections; archival surveys; the documentation of collections of art and material ture; projects to produce bibliographies, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and other research tools, and reference works; professional training in preservation administration and in the care of material culture collections; the stabilization of material culture collections; the work of regional preservation services; research to improve preservation technology and procedures; projects designed to increase public understanding of preservation and access issues; and a national program for the cataloging and preservation of U.S. newspapers on a State-by-State basis. Expenses may include salaries and wages, consultant and other contract services, supplies and limited equipment purchases, travel, and per

diem. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS: Applicant Eligibility: U.S. citizens and residents; State and local gover

ments; sponsored organizations; public and private nonprofit institutions/organizations; other public institutions/organizations; Federally recognized Indian tribal governments; Native American organizations; U.S. Territories; non-government-general; minority organizations; and

other specialized groups; quasi-public nonprofit institutions. Beneficiary Eligibility: U.S. citizens and residents; State and local gov

ernments; sponsored organizations; public and private nonprofit institutions/organizations; other public institutions/organizations; Federally recognized Indian tribal governments; Native American organizations; U.S. Territories; non-govemment-general; minority organizations; and

other specialized groups; quasi-public nonprofit institutions. Credentials Documentation: Costs will be determined in accordance

with OMB Circular No. A-87 for State and local governments. OMB Circular No. A-21 for educational institutions and OMB Circular No.

A-122 for commercial and nonprofit organizations. APPLICATION AND AWARD PROCESS: Preapplication Coordination: After receiving program guidelines, poten

tial applicants should submit brief descriptions of proposed projects prior to formal application to determine eligibility. Telephone and email inquiries are encouraged. The standard application forms as furnished by the Federal agency and required by OMB Circular No. A102 must be used for this program. Guidelines for the program will be sent upon request. This program is excluded from coverage under E.O.

12372. Application Procedure: Direct application to Division of Preservation

and Access, Room 411. NEH application instructions provided upon receipt of initial inquiry outlining eligible project. This program is sub

ject to the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-110. Award Procedure: Applications are evaluated by scholars in the human

ities, museum curators, professionals with expert knowledge of preservation and access methodologies and administrators of libraries, archives, and museums. Awards are made by the Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities after recommendation by the Na

tional Council on the Humanities. Deadlines: July 1. Write to Division of Preservation and Access for spe

cific information. Range of Approval Disapproval Time: Approximately nine months. Appeals: None, but applicant may reapply with a revised proposal. Renewals: Renewal grants are processed and awarded in competition

with and in the same manner as new applications. ASSISTANCE CONSIDERATIONS: Formula and Matching Requirements: Cost-sharing at 33 percent for

brittle books and other consortial projects; 50 percent for projects involving the preservation of, or access to archives and other special collections; 50 percent for National Heritage Preservation Program projects (stabilization of material culture collections); and 20 percent for projects for education and training, regional field service programs, research and demonstration projects. Projects to produce bibliographies,

dictionaries, encyclopedias, and other research tools and reference

works require 33 percent cost-sharing. Length and Time Phasing of Assistance: Up to 36 months, with the ex

ception of the National Heritage Preservation Program Grants, which may encompass up to 5 years. Funds must be expended during the

grant period. Funds are released as required. POST ASSISTANCE REQUIREMENTS: Reports: Progress reports are required semiannually or annually. Cash re

ports are required quarterly. Final progress and expenditures reports are due within 90 days after completion or termination of project support

by NEH. Audits: In accordance with the provisions of OMB Circular No. A-133

(Revised, June 24, 1997), “Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations,” nonfederal entities that receive financial assistance of $300,000 or more in Federal awards will have a single or a program-specific audit conducted for that year. Nonfederal entities that expend less than $300,000 a year in Federal awards are exempt from Federal audit requirements for that year, except as noted in Circular No. A-133. For nongovemmental recipients, audits are to be carried out in accordance with the provisions set forth in OMB Circular No. A110, “Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Nonprofit Organizations Uniform Administrative Requirements” and with OMB Circular No. A-133. In addition, grants

are subject to inspection and audits by NEH and other Federal officials. Records: Documentation of expenditures and other fiscal records must be

retained for 3 years following the submission of the final expenditure

report.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION:

Account Identification: 59-0200-0-1-503.
Obligations: (Grants) FY 99 $18,000,000; FY 00 est $18,328,000; and

FY 01 est $23,400,000.
Range and Average of Financial Assistance: From $28,472 to

$939,900; $281,400. PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS: In fiscal year 1999, 187 applica

tions were received and 60 grants were made. In fiscal year 2000, 20 applications were received and 72 grants are anticipated to be made. I. fiscal year 2001, 680 applications are anticipated and 197 grants are

anticipated. REGULATIONS, GUIDELINES, AND LITERATURE: 45 CFR 1100

and 1105. Applications and guidelines as well as a publication entitled “Overview of Endowment Programs" are available upon request by subscription from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, is the Endowment's official publication, “Humanities" (six issues annually, $18.00 domestic,

$22.50 foreign). INFORMATION CONTACTS:

Regional or Local Office: Not applicable.
Headquarters Office: Division of Preservation and Access, National En-

dowment for the Humanities, Room 411, Washington, DC 20506. Tele-
phone: (202) 606-8570. Use the same number for FTS. FAX (202)

606-8639. E-mail: PRESERVATION@NEH.GOV. RELATED PROGRAMS: 45.164, Promotion of the Humanities Public

Programs. EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS: (1) An award to support a

consortial project involving universities in ten states to preserve on microfilm the intellectual content of 8,000 embrituled volumes that document American agricultural history and rural life between 1820 and 1945; (2) an award to state library to catalog 1,000 newspaper titles and preserve the content of 8,000 pages of deteriorating newsprint; (3) an award to a conservation center to train conservators in techniques of preserving material culture collections; (4) an award to a regional bibliographic center to provide preservation field services to member institutions in 11 states; (5) an award to a university to compile a regional encyclopedia; (6) an award to a university to support the development of standards and best practices for encoding metadata that will facil tate the retrieval of manuscripts and archival documents via the inte net; (7) an award to a university museum to support the rehousing of the museum's anthropological collections; (8) an award to a research library to arrange, describe, and warehouse collections documenting African American theatre arts from the 1930s to the present.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROPOSALS: The criteria used to deter

mine funding priorities include the national significance and potential impact of the project, either for creating, preserving, and establishing intellectual access to important humanities resources or for improving the infrastructure for preservation and access activities in the country's cultural institutions; the soundness of the project's methodology, including its adherence to accepted professional and technical standards or practice; the viability, efficiency, and productivity of the project's plan of work; the professional training and experience of the project's staff in relation to the activity for which support is requested; and the appropriateness of the project's budget.

45.160 PROMOTION OF THE HUMANITIES

FELLOWSHIPS AND STIPENDS FEDERAL AGENCY: NATIONAL ENDOWMENT OF THE HUMAN

ITIES, NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HU

MANITIES AUTHORIZATION: National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities

Act of 1965, as amended, Public Law 89-209, 20 U.S.C. 951 et seq. OBJECTIVES: Fellowships and Summer Stipends provide support for

scholars to undertake full-time independent research and writing in the humanities. Grants are available for 6 to 12-month fellowships and 2

months of summer study. TYPES OF ASSISTANCE: Project Grants (Fellowships). USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Fellowships and Summer Stipends:

Projects may contribute to scholarly knowledge or to the general public's understanding of the humanities. The proposed study or research may be completed during the grant period or it may be part of a longer project. Applications to plan institutional curricula, educational research projects, work in the creative or performing arts, and studies

that lack humanities content or methodology are not eligible. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS: Applicant Eligibility: All applicants must be U.S. citizens, native resi

dents of U.S. jurisdictions, or foreign nationals who have been legal residents in the U.S. or its jurisdictions for at least the three years immediately preceding the application deadline. Fellowships: Faculty members at colleges and universities, individuals affiliated with other institutions, independent scholars, and others who work in the humanities are eligible. Applicants need not have advanced degrees, but they must have completed their professional training. Active candidates for degrees and persons seeking support for work leading to degrees are not eligible. Summer Stipends: University and college faculty members normally must be nominated by their academic institutions. Faculty members with terminating appointments and all other applicants are ex

empt from nomination and may apply directly. Beneficiary Eligibility: Fellowships and Stipends: College and university

faculty and staff, individuals affiliated with institutions other than col

leges and universities, and scholars and writers working independently. Credentials/Documentation: This program is excluded from coverage

under OMB Circular No. A-87. APPLICATION AND AWARD PROCESS: Preapplication Coordination: This program is excluded from coverage

under OMB Circular Nos. A-102 and E.O. 12372. Application Procedure: Application materials are available from, and

submitted to, the headquarters office listed below. This program is ex

cluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-110. Award Procedure: Applications are reviewed by panels of scholars and

other appropriate individuals. Awards are made by the Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities after advice from the National

Council on the Humanities. Deadlines: Fellowships: Annual deadline of May 1, for projects begin

ning after January 1, of the following year. Summer Stipends: annual
deadline of October 1, for projects beginning after May 1, of the fol-

lowing year.
Range of Approval/Disapproval Time: Six to seven months.
Appeals: None, but applicant may reapply.
Renewals: None.

ASSISTANCE CONSIDERATIONS:
Formula and Matching Requirements: This program has no statutory

formula or matching requirements. Source: Program Guidelines. Con

tact: See Headquarters Office below. Length and Time Phasing of Assistance: Fellowships are held from 6

to 12 months, with payment in quarterly installments. Summer Stipends are held for 2 consecutive months, with stipends disbursed in one pay

ment. POST ASSISTANCE REQUIREMENTS: Reports: A final report is required within 90 days after the end of the

tenure period describing the results of the work done during the period

of the award. Audits: Subject to audit by Endowment auditors or their representatives.

Records: Not applicable.
FINANCIAL INFORMATION:

Account Identification: 59-0200-0-1-503.
Obligations: (Grants) FY 99 $5,608,000; FY 00 est $5,940,000; and FY

01 est $7,185,000. Range and Average of Financial Assistance: Fellowships: An award up

to $30,000 for a grant period of from 9 to 12 months; an award of

$24,000 for a grant period of from 6 to 8 months. PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS: In fiscal year 1999, 2,204 applica

tions were received and 313 awards were made. In fiscal year 2000, it is estimated that 2,210 applications will be received and 315 awards will be made. In fiscal year 2001, it is estimated that 3,550 applications

will be received and 682 awards will be made. REGULATIONS, GUIDELINES, AND LITERATURE: 45 CFR 1100

and 1105. Applications and guidelines as well as a publication entitled “Overview of Endowment Programs" are available upon request from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Room 409, Washington, DC 20506. Available by subscription from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Govemment Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, is the Endowment's official publication, “Humanities" (six issues annu

ally, $16.00 domestic, $20.00 foreign). INFORMATION CONTACTS:

Regional or Local Office: Not applicable.
Headquarters Office: Fellowships and Stipends, Division of Research,

National Endowment for the Humanities, Room 318, Washington, DC

20506. Telephone: (202) 606-8466. Use the same number for FTS. RELATED PROGRAMS: 45.161, Promotion of the Humanities—Re

search; 45.163, Promotion of the Humanities-Seminars and Institutes. EXAMPLES OF FUNDED PROJECTS: (1) Fellowships for University

Teachers: Art History and Hegemony in Latin America: Afro-Brazil; (2) Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars: Studies in Aristotle's Scientific Thinking; (3) Summer Stipends: Citizen

Activism for Nuclear Disarmament and Its Impact, 1971 to present. CRITERIA FOR SELECTING PROPOSALS: For Fellowships and Sum

mer Stipends: The significance of the contribution to thought and knowledge in the humanities; the quality or promise of quality of the applicant's work; the quality of the conception, definition, organization, and description of the proposed project; and the likelihood that the applicant will complete the entire project.

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45.161 PROMOTION OF THE HUMANITIES

RESEARCH

FEDERAL AGENCY: NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMAN

ITIES, NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HU

MANITIES AUTHORIZATION: National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities

Act of 1965, as amended, Public Law 89-209, 20 U.S.C. 951 et seq. OBJECTIVES: To strengthen the intellectual foundations of the humanities

through the collaboration of scholars and the support of post-doctoral

fellowship programs at independent research institutions. TYPES OF ASSISTANCE: Project Grants. USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Collaborative Research grants support

up to three years of research. Awards support direct costs, including salaries, travel, supplies, and appropriate research assistance and consultation. Grants also support fellowships offered through independent research centers and institutions.

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