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and Administrative Services Act pertaining to conveyances of real property for recreational purposes. Section 602 (a) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended, continues in effect section 13 (h) of the Surplus Property Act of 1944, as amended. Section 13 (h) (2) thereof provides as follows:

“Conveyances for park or recreational purposes made pursuant to the authority contained in this subsection shall be made at a price equal to 50 per centum of the fair value of the property conveyed, based on the highest and best use of the property at the time it is offered for disposal, regardless of the former character or use, as determined by the Administrator. Conveyances of property for historic monument purposes under this subsection shall be made without monetary consideration: Provided, That no property shall be determined under this paragraph to be suitable or desirable for use as an historic monument except in conformity with the recommendation of the Advisory Board on National Parks, Historic Sites, Buildings, and Monuments established by section 3 of the Act entitled 'An act for the preservation of historic American sites, buildings, objects, and antiquities of national significance, and for other purposes,' approved August 21, 1935 (49 Stat. 666), and no property shall be so determined to be suitable or desirable for such use if (A) its area exceeds that necessary for the preservation and proper observation of the historic monument situated thereon, or (B) it was acquired by the United States at any time subsequent to January 1, 1900.”

This bill, if enacted, will, in effect, eliminate the requirement for the payment of 50 percent of the fair value of the real property conveyed for recreational areas as required by section 13 (h) (2) and substitute the public-benefit allowance provision now provided in section 203 (k) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended. In this connection, the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended, contains broad authority for the disposition of surplus real property to States and local governments and institutions for specific public uses, either without consideration or under significantly favorable pricing formulas. While disposals for these purposes serve useful purposes, they (1) frequently entail delays in the disposal of surplus real property by sale to the general public, (2) prevent the return of surplus real property to the local tax rolls, and (3) substantially reduce the monetary return to the Federal Government. Enactment of this measure would enlarge the scope of such disposals. With the increasing demands on available financial resources of the Federal Government to support and maintain the desired level of Federal governmental activities, any action which would result in the depletion of sources of revenue at this time is of doubtful wisdom.

For these reasons, GSA is opposed to the enactment of H. R. 10789. The fiscal effects of the enactment of this measure on the returns that might be realized from the disposal of surplus property, as presently authorized, cannot be evaluated.

The Bureau of the Budget has advised that there is no objection to th ubmission of this report to your committee. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN FLOETE, Administrator,

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION,

Washington, D. C., April 4, 1958. Hon. WILLIAM L. DAWSON, Chairman, Committee on Government Operations,

House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN : Your letters of March 6 and 12, 1958, requested reports by General Services Administration on identical bills H. R. 11115 and H. R. 11324, to amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the donation of surplus property to volunteer fire-fighting organizations.

These bills are similar to a number of bills which have been introduced for the purpose of extending the existing authorization for donation of surplus personal property (which is limited to the purposes of education, public health, and civil defense) to cover various other special activities and organizations.

Initially, we wish to point out that in the drafting of H. R. 11115 and H. R. 11324 there has been a failure to reflect the amendments made in section 203 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 by Public Law

200 of the 84th Congress, approved August 1, 1955 (69 Stat. 430), and Public Law 655 of the 84th Congress, approved July 3, 1956 (70 Stat. 493).

Notwithstanding how worthy may be the objectives of these volunteer firefighting organizations, GSA objects to H. R. 11115 and H. R. 11324 for the reasons hereinafter set forth.

The enactment of these legislative proposals would impede the handling of surplus property by the Government and introduce new elements of costs for the Government to pay. Specifically, it would :

(a) Delay the disposal of unneeded Government property while competing claims of individual volunteer fire-fighting organizations are being considered with additional costs accruing to the Government for maintenance and storage of the property and attendant administrative tasks.

(6) Complicate the disposal of surplus property by introducing competition for available property between individual volunteer fire-fighting organizations and other claimants on behalf of education, public health, and civil defense activities. This will present a recurring problem, likely to engender

ill will and create still further delays in warehouse clearance. To broaden the surplus property donation authority of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to cover this comprehensive new group would operate as an invitation to present still more proposals for inclusion of further organizations. Enactment of H. R. 11115 and H. R. 11324, or adoption of such additional proposals would inevitably result not only in increased administrative costs and complication of disposal operations, but also in jeopardizing the orderly procedures for surplus disposal now being carried out under the direction of GSA pursuant to the provisions of that act.

The nature of these legislative proposals is such as to make impossible any firm estimate by us of the probable cost attributable thereto.

The Bureau of the Budget has advised that there is no objection to the submission of this report to your committee. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN FLOETE, Administrator.

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION,

Washington, D.C., April 16, 1958. Hon. WILLIAM L. DAWSON, Chairman, Committee on Government Operations,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN : Your letter of March 21, 1958, requested a report by General Services Administration on H. R. 11516, to amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the donation of surplus property to volunteer fire-fighting organizations.

This bill is one of a number of bills which have been introduced for the purpose of extending the existing authorization for donation of surplus personal property (which is limited to the purposes of education, public health, and civil defense) to cover various other special activities and organizations.

Initially, we wish to point out that in the drafting of H. R. 11516 there has been a failure to reflect the amendments made in section 203 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 by Public Law 200 of the 84th Congress, approved August 1, 1955 (69 Stat. 430), and Public Law 655 of the 84th Congress, approved July 3, 1956 (70 Stat. 493).

Notwithstanding how worthy may be the objectives of these volunteer firefighting organizations, GSA objects to H. R. 11516 for the reasons hereinafter set forth.

The enactment of this legislative proposal would impede the handling of surplus property by the Government and introduce new elements of costs for the Government to pay. Specifically, it would :

(a) Delay the disposal of unneeded Government property while competing claims of individual volunteer fire-fighting organizations are being considered with additional costs accruing to the Government for maintenance and storage of the property and attendant administrative tasks.

(0) Complicate the disposal of surplus property by introducing competition for available property between individual volunteer fire-fighting organizations and other claimants on behalf of education, public health, and civil defense activities. This will present a recurring problem, likely to engender

ill will and create still further delays in warehouse clearance. To broaden the surplus property donation authority of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to cover this comprehensive new group would operate as an invitation to present still more proposals for inclusion of further organizations. Enactment of H. R. 11516, or adoption of such additional proposals would inevitably result not only in increased administrative costs and complication of disposal operations, but also in jeopardizing the orderly procedures for surplus disposal now being carried out under the direction of GSA pursuant to the provisions of that act.

The nature of this legislative proposal is such as to make impossible any firm estimate by us of the probable cost attributable thereto.

The Bureau of the Budget has advised that there is no objection to the submission of this report to your committee. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN FLOETE, Administrator.

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION,

Washington, D. C., May 20, 1958. Hon. WILLIAM L. DAWSON, Chairman, Committee on Government Operations,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN : Your letter of April 28, 1958, requested a report by General Services Administration on H. R. 12025, to amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the donation of surplus property to volunteer fire-fighting organizations.

This bill is one of a number of bills which have been introduced for the purpose of extending the existing authorization for donation of surplus personal property (which is limited to the purposes of education, public health, and civil defense) to cover various other special activities and organizations.

Initially, we wish to point out that in the drafting of H. R. 12025 there has been a failure to reflect the amendments made in section 203 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 by Public Law 200 of the 84th Congress, approved August 1, 1955 (69 Stat. 430), and Public Law 655 of the 84th Congress, approved July 3, 1956 (70 Stat. 493).

Notwithstanding how worthy may be the objectives of these volunteer firefighting organizations, GSA objects to H. R. 12025 for the reasons hereinafter set forth.

The enactment of this legislative proposal would impede the handling of surplus property by the Government and introduce new elements of costs for the Government to pay. Specifically, it would

(a) Delay the disposal of unneeded Government property while competing claims of individual volunteer fire-fighting organizations are being considered with additional costs accruing to the Government for maintenance and storage of the property and attendant administrative tasks.

(b) Complicate the disposal of surplus property by introducing competition for available property between individual volunteer fire-fighting organizations and other claimants on behalf of education, public health, and civil defense activities. This will present a recurring problem, likely to

engender ill will and create still further delays in warehouse clearance. To broaden the surplus property donation authority of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to cover this comprehensive new group would operate as an invitation to present still more proposals for inclusion of further organizations. Enactment of H. R. 12025, or adoption of such additional proposals would inevitably result not only in increased administrative costs and complication of disposal operations, but also in jeopardizing the orderly procedures for surplus disposal now being carried out under the direction of GSA pursuant to the provisions of that act.

The nature of this legislative proposal is such as to make impossible any firm estimate by us of the probable cost attributable thereto.

The Bureau of the Budget has advised that there is no objection to the submission of this report to your committee. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN FLOETE, Administrator.

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION,

Washington, D. C., July 15, 1958. Hon. WILLIAM L. DAWSON, Chairman, Committee on Government Operations,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN : Your letter of June 18, 1958, requested a report by General Services Administration on H. R. 12959, to amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the donation of surplus property to volunteer fire-fighting organizations.

This bill is one of a number of bills which have been introduced for the purpose of extending the existing authorization for donation of surplus personal property (which is limited to the purposes of education, public health, and civil defense) to cover various other special activities and organizations.

Initially, we wish to point out that in the drafting of H. R. 12959 there has been a failure to reflect the amendments made in section 203 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 by Public Law 200 of the 84th Congress, approved August 1, 1955 (69 Stat. 430), and Public Law 655 of the 84th Congress, approved July 3, 1956 (70 Stat. 493).

Notwithstanding how worthy may be the objectives of these volunteer firefighting organizations, GSA objects to H. R. 12959 for the reasons hereinafter set forth.

The enactment of this legislative proposal would impede the handling of surplus property by the Government and introduce new elements of costs for the Government to pay. Specifically, it would :

(a) Delay the disposal of unneeded Government property while competing claims of individual volunteer fire-fighting organizations are being considered with additional costs accruing to the Government for maintenance and storage of the property and attendant administrative tasks.

(6) Complicate the disposal of surplus property by introducing competition for available property between individual volunteer fire-fighting organizations and other claimants on behalf of education, public health, and civil defense activities. This will present a recurring problem, likely to engender

ill will and create still further delays in warehouse clearance. To broaden the surplus property donation authority of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to cover this comprehensive new group would operate as an invitation to present still more proposals for inclusion of further organizations. Enactment of H. R. 12959, or adoption of such additional proposals would inevitably result not only in increased administrative costs and complication of disposal operations, but also in jeopardizing the orderly procedures for surplus disposal now being carried out under the direction of GSA pursuant to the provisions of that act. The nature of this legislative proposal is such as to make impossible any firm estimate by us of the probable cost attributable thereto.

The Bureau of the Budget has advised that there is no objection to the submission of this report to your committee. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN FLOETE, Administrator.

EXHIBIT 5-REPLY FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D. C., April 25, 1957. Hon. WILLIAM L. DAWSON, Chairman, Committee on Government Operations,

House of Representatives. DEAR CONGRESSMAN DAWSON: This is in reply to your request of January 17, 1957, for a report on H. R. 2504, a bill to provide that Government surplus prop erty may be donated to 4-H Clubs for the construction, equipment, and operation of camps and centers.

This Department is in favor of the objective of the bill, in view of the value of 4-H Club work to farm youth and the entire Nation. However, we are not in a position to make a specific recommendation regarding passage of the bill, since it would have no direct effect on this Department's surplus property disposal operations.

If such legislation is to be enacted, we recommend that it be amended so as to provide that an official entity be designated within a State to which such property could be allocated, and that its use be controlled within the administrative channels responsible for conducting 4-H Club work. In practically all conceivable instances where there would be an interest in acquiring such property for 4-H Club use, more than one individual club would be involved; hence, it would be inappropriate to allocate such property directly to an individual club.

This bill would amend section 203 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act. With the above suggested amendments it would authorize the Administrator to donate to the appropriate State agency for use by 4-H Clubs surplus equipment, materials, or other supplies determined to be usable and necessary for the construction, equipment, and operation of 4-H Club camps and centers. Determination of the usability and necessity of such surplus property for the construction, equipment, and operation of 4-H Club camps and centers would be made by the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, and such property would be allocated on the basis of needs.

The Bureau of the Budget advises that there is no objection to the submission of this report. Sincerely yours,

TRUE D. M SE, Acting Secretary.

EXHIBIT 6_REPLIES FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND

WELFARE
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE,

August 1, 1957.
Hon. WILLIAM L. DAWSON,
Chairman, Committee on Government Operations,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN : This letter is in response to your requests for reports on the following bills, listed in numerical order :

H. R. 242, a bill to amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the donation of surplus property to certain community organizations, i. e., volunteer fire departments and volunteer rescue and lifesaving squads.

H. R. 2504, a bill to provide that Government surplus property may be donated to 4-H Clubs for the construction, equipment, and operation of camps and centers.

H. R. 2552, a bill to amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the donation of surplus property to volunteer fire-fighting organizations.

H. R. 3406, a bill to amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the donation of surplus property to volunteer fire-fighting organizations.

H. R. 4007, a bill to amend section 203 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the disposal of surplus property to publicly owned water districts and publicly owned sewer districts.

H. R. 4107, a bill to amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the donation of surplus property to volunteer fire-fighting organizations, volunteer reserve services, squads, and first-aid crews.

H. R. 5451, a bill to amend section 203 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1919 to permit the disposal of surplus property to municipalities.

H. R. 6316, a bill to amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the donation of surplus property to volunteer fire-fighting organizations, volunteer reserve services, squads, and first-aid crews.

H. R. 7929, a bill to amend the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to permit the donation of surplus property to volunteer fire

fighting organizations. All of these bills would amend section 203 of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 so as to authorize donations of surplus personal property for certain purposes, and to certain organizations, not now eligible.

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