Landmark Supreme Court Cases: A Reference Guide

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999 - 374 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified


This needed resource, written specifically for students and general readers, provides accessible discussions of 74 landmark Supreme Court cases that will help students understand the cases and their importance in American history. Cases selected for this work are those in which the Supreme Court's decisions have had a profound impact on society and the future and a meaning that transcends the impact on the immediate parties. In his own words, Donald Lively, Dean of Florida Coastal School of Law, discusses the facts, background, and significance of each landmark case so that students will be able to easily understand it. Each case features a fact box for quick reference succinctly identifying the issue, year of decision, outcome, vote, and author of the opinion. The narrative discussion of each case puts it in historical perspective, examines the background and constitutional issue involved, the case itself, why it is a landmark case, and its significance and impact. A short bibliography directs readers to a more in-depth discussion of the case and issue.

The work is organized topically into four parts, within which the cases are organized chronologically from the nation's first court through the 1990s so that the reader can trace the progression of the Court's thinking on the issue. Part I focuses upon the separation and distribution of powers among the branches of government. Part II consists of cases that have been crucial in determining the relationship between the nation and its states, the concept of federalism, and regulation of the country's economy. Part III deals with the most important cases involving equality--race, gender, and fundamental rights. Part IV identifies landmark cases on individual rights and liberties--freedom of speech, association, press and other media, religion, search and seizure, self-incrimination, right to counsel, cruel and unusual punishment, economic rights, and the right to privacy. Each part begins with an overview of the issues raised by the cases discussed. A glossary of legal terms, a table of cases, and a handy text of the Constitution will help the student researcher. This work is ideal for the high school library and classroom.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

III
17
IV
25
V
39
VI
41
VII
51
VIII
63
X
69
XI
75
XVIII
213
The First Amendment Freedom of Association
217
XIX
253
XX
273
XXI
287
XXII
293
XXIII
299
XXIV
307

XII
77
Economic Regulation
81
XIII
139
XIV
145
XV
159
XVI
161
XXV
341
XXVI
347
Cases
351
XXVII
367
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 359 - Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each Person. [2] The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it. [3] No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed. [4] No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein before directed to be taken.
Page 168 - The question in every case is whether the words used are used in such circumstances and are of such a nature as to create a clear and present danger that they will bring about the substantive evils that Congress has a right to prevent.
Page 362 - All debts contracted, and engagements entered into, before the adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the confederation. 2. -This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be...
Page 75 - What these fundamental principles are, it would be more tedious than difficult to enumerate. They may all, however, be comprehended under the following general heads: protection by the government, with the right to acquire and possess property of every kind, and to pursue and obtain happiness and safety, subject nevertheless, to such restraints as the government may prescribe for the general good of the whole...
Page 360 - The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.

About the author (1999)

DONALD E. LIVELY is Dean of the Florida Coastal School of Law. He is author of Essential Principles of Communications Law (Praeger, 1991), Modern Communications Law (Praeger, 1991), The Constitution and Race (1992), and Foreshadows of the Law (Praeger, 1992).

Bibliographic information