The Works of Charles Dickens: In Thirty Volumes, Volume 11

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Chapman and Hall, 1881
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Contents

I
1
II
5
III
11
IV
16
V
29
VI
41
VII
53
VIII
60
XXIV
206
XXV
213
XXVI
221
XXVII
225
XXIX
237
XXX
243
XXXI
251
XXXII
264

IX
67
X
82
XI
89
XII
96
XIII
109
XIV
119
XV
125
XVI
137
XVII
146
XVIII
151
XIX
159
XX
165
XXI
176
XXII
188
XXIII
200
XXXIII
277
XXXIV
284
XXXV
290
XXXVII
296
XXXVIII
303
XXXIX
310
XL
314
XLI
330
XLII
344
XLIII
360
XLIV
365
XLV
375
XLVI
388
XLVII
401

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Page 405 - I am the Resurrection and the Life, saith the Lord : he that believeth in Me, though he were dead, yet shall he live : and whosoever liveth and believeth in Me shall never die." The murmuring of many voices, the upturning of many faces, the pressing on of many footsteps in the outskirts of the crowd, so that it swells forward in a mass, like one great heave of water, all flashes away. Twenty-Three.
Page 401 - Guillotine. And yet there is not in France, with its rich variety of soil and climate, a blade, a leaf, a root, a sprig, a peppercorn, which will grow to maturity under conditions more certain than those that have produced this horror. Crush humanity out of shape once more, under similar hammers, and it will twist itself into the same tortured forms.
Page 405 - Yes." She kisses his lips; he kisses hers; they solemnly bless each other. The spare hand does not tremble as he releases it; nothing worse than a sweet, bright constancy is in the patient face. She goes next before him - is gone; the knitting-women count Twenty-Two. "I am the Resurrection and the Life, saith the Lord: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die.
Page 10 - A WONDERFUL fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.
Page 313 - Lord our God, arise ! Scatter his enemies, And make them fall. Confound their politics, Frustrate their knavish tricks ; On him our hopes we fix — God save us all ! Thy choicest gifts in store On him be pleased to pour ; Long may he reign.
Page 53 - TELLSON'S Bank by Temple Bar was an old-fashioned place, even in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty. It was very small, very dark, very ugly, very incommodious. It was an old-fashioned place, moreover, in the ' moral attribute that the partners in the House were proud of its smallness, proud of its darkness, proud of its ugliness, proud of its uncoramodiousness.
Page 1 - IT was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way — in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest...
Page 107 - Let us shudder too. We may know what it is." " It will seem nothing to you. Such whims are only impressive as we originate them, I think ; they are not to be communicated. I have sometimes sat alone here of an evening, listening, until I have made the echoes out to be the echoes of all the footsteps that are coming by and by into our lives." " There is a great crowd coming one day into our lives, if that be so," Sydney Carton struck in, in his moody way.

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